World
Now, France asks Facebook to stop sending user data to US
London : In another setback to Facebook in Europe, the French data protection authority has ordered the social networking giant to stop sending user data to the US and comply with the European data protection law.
 
According to a report in technology website Tech Crunch, Facebook has been given three months to make the changes deemed necessary by the data protection authority CNIL and failing to do so will incur heavy fines.
 
Specifically, the data protection agency is unhappy that Facebook collects the browsing activity of internet users who do not have a Facebook account.
 
“The company does not inform Internet users that it sets a cookie on their terminal when they visit a Facebook public page (page of a public event or of a friend). This cookie transmits to Facebook information relating to third-party websites offering Facebook plug-ins (e.g. Like button) that are visited by Internet users,” the CNIL notice read.
 
According to the notice, Facebook collects user data concerning sexual orientation, religious and political views “without the explicit consent of account holders”. Nor does it inform users on the sign up form “with regard to their rights and the processing of their personal data”.
 
Facebook is also accused of using the now illegal “Safe Harbor” data transfer mechanism - a longstanding trans-Atlantic data transfer agreement that was invalidated by the European Court of Justice last year, the report added.
 
According to a Facebook spokesperson, “We are confident that we comply with European Data Protection law and look forward to engaging with the CNIL to respond to their concerns.”
 
According to CNIL, it has made its notice against Facebook public due to “the seriousness of the violations and the number of individuals concerned by the Facebook service”.
 
Facebook has more than 30 million users in France.
 
The social networking giant is facing several privacy-related probes in Europe.
 
In November, a Belgian court ordered the company to stop using cookies to track the web activity of its users.
 
As well as investigations by the French and Belgian authorities, Facebook is also being probed by Spanish, Dutch and German (Hamburg) data protection authorities.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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This tech could give you week's battery in single charge
London : With this new technology, your phone could get an entire week's battery life in a single charge.
 
"Give us more juice" was the cry from tech enthusiasts at this year's Consumer Electronics Show held in January in Las Vegas and the number one item on their tech wish list was better battery life, Fortune said in its survey report.
 
To this increasing demand, Intelligent Energy -- a 27-year-old British company working on clean power technology -- has an answer.
 
The company, in partnership with an "emerging" smartphone manufacturer, is working to bring hydrogen fuel cell technology to mobile devices that could give more life to batteries in a single charge.
 
"Hydrogen fuel cells do not work like conventional lithium-ion batteries, charging and re-charging electrodes every time a phone needs a boost," Fortune reported.
 
"Instead they generate electricity from a chemical reaction, combining hydrogen with oxygen to create an electrical current as well as a water by-product."
 
"This technology can also be used to make a hybrid fuel cell battery. By integrating the powerful fuel cells into a phone battery, the device continues to be wall-chargeable, but also packs a boost of backup power," the report noted.
 
But to power up a fuel cell, you need to literally gas it up, adding more hydrogen to the device.
 
The company had worked with Boeing to develop a fuel cell airplane in 2008 and in 2010 it helped put a fuel cell hybrid black cab on the streets of London.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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Red Cross Donations Plummet and Deficit Spikes

The charity has its worst fundraising year since at least 2000

 

The American Red Cross ran a deficit of $159 million last fiscal year, battered by a steep drop in fundraising and its struggling blood banking division, according to newly released financial statements.

 

Former AT&T executive Gail McGovern, who was hired as CEO in 2008 with a brief to stabilize the charity's finances, has spent the last eight years making deep cuts in the Red Cross' workforce and trying to bring in more donations with an increased focus on branding.

 

But the new financial statements show contributions to the Red Cross fell to $604 million, about $120 million less than the previous year. It is the worst fundraising result the Red Cross has had since at least 2000, the last year for which we could find financial records.

 

The Red Cross' fundraising can swing wildly, spiking when there's a major disaster and dropping in years with no big televised catastrophe. But there have been no signature disasters in either of the past two years, raising the question of why donations dropped so much.

 

A Red Cross spokesperson declined to comment in response to questions about its financial results.

 

In a letter to a congressman last month, McGovern says she presided over "Turnaround I" after inheriting financial problems at the charity in 2008 and that she is now in the midst of "Turnaround II" as a result of a drop in demand for blood.

 

The Red Cross' large blood banking division, which has been struggling amid industry-wide declines and other issues, lost $71 million in 2015.

 

McGovern also wrote in the letter that fundraising is actually improving, but the charity has not provided data to substantiate the claim.

 

McGovern wrote that donations have increased "14 percent since 2008" if major disasters are excluded. It's not clear how the group is arriving at the figure. It declined our request for details on the calculation.

 

The group's revenue in 2015 was also hurt by a decline in contributions from the United Way and other federated sources, which fell from $104 million to $77 million. A United Way spokesperson told us it has cut contributions to the Red Cross in recent years because it has shifted to a "community impact funding model."

 

While the Red Cross' audited financial statements show a $159 million deficit for last fiscal year, McGovern last month cited an "operating deficit" of just $36 million for the year. The charity previously said that it created a concept of "operating" surpluses or deficits that "reflect Red Cross performance in managing our day-to-day revenues and expenses." But it's impossible to tell where that figure comes from because the group has declined to show its calculations.

 

If you have information about the Red Cross 2014 or any other tips 2014 please email [email protected].

 

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.

 

 

 

 

 

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