Citizens' Issues
No toilet at home: Bihar woman divorces husband
A woman in a Bihar village has divorced her husband for not constructing a toilet at their house, officials said Tuesday.
 
Sunita Devi, a resident of Paharpur village in Vaishali district, divorced her husband in village panchayat after he failed to build a toilet despite repeated assurances.
 
Interestingly, Paharpur village was declared a 'nirmal-gram' by the government.
 
"I was fed up with my husband for not building a toilet and was forced to leave him," Sunita told IANS by telephone.
 
"I was upset over being forced to make way to an open field every day under the cover of darkness to defecate. Even owner of the land used to abuse and humiliate me repeatedly," Sunita said.
 
"For the last four years, I have been requesting my husband to construct the toilet. But he always ignored it and advised me to seek help of my parents for it," Sunita said.
 
Bihar has a population of over 105 million, of which 21.9 million lack toilet facilities. 

User

GST bill goes to Rajya Sabha select committee
The bill on the goods and services tax (GST) was on Tuesday sent to a select committee of the Rajya Sabha.
 
The committee will table its report in the upper house on the last day of the first week of next parliament session.
 
The 21-member committee is headed by Bhupender Yadav of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).
 
Other members of the committee are: Chandan Mitra and Ajay Sancheti (BJP), Madhusudan Mistry, Bhalchandra Mungekar and Mani Shankar Aiyar (Congress), K.C. Tyagi (JD-U), Derek O'Brien (Trinamool Congress), A. Navaneethakrishnan (AIADMK), Satish Chandra Misra (BSP), K.N. Balagopal (CPI-M), Dilip Kumar Tirkey (BJD), C.M. Ramesh (TDP), Praful Patel (NCP), Kanimozhi (DMK), Anil Desai (Shiv Sena), Naresh Gujral (Shiromani Akali Dal), Mir Mohammad Fayaz (PDP), D. Raja (CPI) and Independent MP Rajeev Chandrasekhar.
 
The GST bill is seen as the key to facilitating industrial growth and improving the country's business climate.
 
By subsuming most indirect taxes levied by the central and state governments such as excise duty, service tax, VAT and sales tax, the goods and services tax regime proposes to facilitate a common market across the country, leading to economies of scale and reducing inflation through an efficient supply chain.
 
The government wants to implement the new regime before April 2016.
 
The passage of the bill to become a law is, however, a lengthy process. 
 
Being a constitution amendment bill, which was passed by the Lok Sabha, it needs to be passed by the Rajya Sabha with a two-thirds majority and then ratified by at least 15 state legislatures before being sent for the President's assent.

User

Earthquakes and their impact: Building codes must be strictly followed
In earthquakes, building collapses claim human lives. Some of the major cities in the Indo-Gangetic plain are connected underground upto Himalayan region
 
A big earthquake in Assam and in the Himalayan region was expected ever since I was a geophysics student at Banaras Hindu University during 1974-1976. At that time, funding agencies spent money for routine observations of various parameters in the wake of a major earthquake. In the past, a few major earthquakes have occurred in the Himalayan region: the Bihar-Nepal earthquake of In 1988, Uttarkashi in 1991 and Chamoli in 1999. They claimed many lives and many houses collapsed, especially during the Uttarkashi quake. The major damage to buildings occurred because of the poor quality of construction.
 
In the last three decades the population has increased and the density of buildings has also increased in the Indo-Gangetic plain; many high rise buildings have mushroomed in many cities in this area.
 
In earthquakes, building collapses claim human lives. Some of the major cities in the Indo-Gangetic plain are connected underground upto Himalayan region. If any major earthquake occurs in the Himalayan region, the energy will be transmitted to major cities - especially Delhi and the surrounding. Can all the houses and highrises sustain the ground acceleration generated by any earthquake? Taking the lead in this, IIT-Kanpur emphasized, at a series of conferences and workshops during 1988-2007, that building codes must be strictly followed in. But in India, it is difficult to follow these building codes and most of the buildings are built these only on the paper.
 
In India, we have the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), whose chairman is the prime minister. During the earlier Congress regime, scientists were involved and now Narendra Modi has been criticized for remove many scientific members and administrators. I must appreciate Mr. Modi’s action and his vision as some of the members were enjoying their positions without doing anything and never ever participated or visited any areas prone to natural hazards. 
 
I would urge Mr. Modi to launch an outreach programme on TV to warn people living in the Himalayan and Indo-Gangetic plain areas to make their buildings safe by following proper building codes and even educate poor people how to make a cheap and safe buildings so that human lives can be saved if an earthquake occurs. We must also educate school students about the different kind of natural hazards and their impact and how to save themselves. 
 
Earthquake prediction is a big challenge before scientists and it is difficult to expect any early warning. Scientists must be involved in understanding earthquake processes and develop building codes for different regions. The Ministry of Earth Sciences may consider enhancing the GPS network in the Himalayan region at intervals of 50-100 km. Overall, NDMA must study how to implement building codes to design earthquake proof buildings since a big earthquake may occur tomorrow or in a week or in s month or in a year. 
 
We should not forget 1923 Tokyo earthquake of 7.9 magnitude, which killed more than 148,000 people, with 50,000 going missing and thousands of buildings collapsing. These days, buildings are generally intact with the same magnitude earthquake in Japan since building codes are strictly followed. 

User

COMMENTS

B. Yerram Raju

2 years ago

NGRI should guide the state governments on the zones that should be avoided for constructing multiplexes or residential complexes that should not cross certain number of floors and space. Second, all marshy soils and river and lake beds and seismic zones should not be allowed for any building beyond five floors. Japan has technologies that has enabled its citizens to safeguard against the earthquakes and also the roof and interior structures that can withstand the onslaught of high tremors. Let us learn from them and implement them. This should be in sync with the smart city and city Challenge projects on the anvil.Government departments should learn to work together and not in silos.

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)