Stocks
Nifty, Sensex may struggle to rally – Thursday closing report
Nifty has to stay above 8,110 for the recent rally to sustain
 
We had mentioned in Wednesday’s closing report that Nifty, Sensex may stall and that Nifty has to close above 8,115 for the upmove to continue. Profit booking, coupled with caution over the upcoming quarterly results, subdued investor sentiment on Thursday. The major indices in the Indian stock markets were range-bound and closed with less than 1% losses.
 
 
The Indian equity markets, which had rallied for the past six consecutive sessions till Wednesday, receded following uncertainty over the upcoming Bank of England's rate hike decision expected later in the day. Analysts said the markets fell on the back of profit bookings after six consecutive days of rise and were subdued due to investors' anxiety before the release of second-quarter results. Sector-wise, healthcare, banking, capital goods, automobile and fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) stocks came under selling pressure.
 
The top gainers and top losers of the major indices are given in the table below:
 
 
The closing values of the major Asian indices are given in the table below:
 
 
Among European indices, the DAX was at 9,989.49, up 0.19% and the FTSE 100 was at 6,355.47, up 0.30%.

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Nestle India asks why fresh tests on Maggi
Nestle India on Thursday asked the apex consumer court why fresh tests were being ordered on Maggi noodles on food safety when a similar exercise has already been conducted as per directions of the Bombay High Court.
 
The matter came up before the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission, which heard it for nearly three hours.
 
The bench of Justice V.K. Jain and Justice B.C. Gupta was hearing a class action suit filed against Nestle India.
 
It said the commission would hear the application again on October 15 with regard to fresh tests on Maggi samples.
 
"We are waiting for the results of the samples from three government-recommended laboratories as it was ordered by the high court. As such what is the need of parallel tests," Nestle's attorney asked about the suit filed by the consumer affairs ministry for alleged unfair trade practices by Nestle.
 
Nestle's attorney said sampling should not be done to devalue the larger bench.
 
Apprehensions about the samples being tampered with cannot be ruled out as they were not recommended either by the FSSAI officials or the consumer directly, the counsel said.
 
On the issue of monosodium glutamate (MSG), the attorney said MSG was permitted for seasoning in noodles and since the product was not meant for children below 12 months of age, mentioning "No added MSG" on the packet was not mandatory.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

Mahesh S Bhatt

1 year ago

Sad Country India.

Volkswagen's CEO resigned within a week of Emission finding flaw in USA Volkswagen Diesel car.

Welcome to India Prahlad Khakhar AD-MAD MAN protect Nestle clients challenging our systems.

Second Government of India transfers FSSAI DG.

Media confuses by comments from unwarranted experts.

Ram Vilas Paswan/Modi silent.

Why will honesty survive in corrupt India when our systems fail us.

When Terrorists is hanged our Media raises Human Rights issues of Convict but FORGETS HUMAN WHO LOST THEIR RIGHTS TO LIVE BY TERROR ATTACKS.

LETS CHANGE.

Mahesh Bhatt

Candle soot could power electric car batteries: Indian researchers
Burning a candle could be all that it takes to make an inexpensive but powerful electric car battery, researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology in Hyderabad have found.
 
The research revealed that candle soot could be used to power the kind of lithium-ion battery that is used in plug-in hybrid electric cars.
 
"We are very excited about the results. This new approach is very easy and the costs involved are minimal -- it would make battery production cheaper," said Chandra Sharma, one of the study authors.
 
Sharma estimated that one hybrid car would need ten kg of carbon soot, which would be deposited in about an hour using candles.
 
Their discovery opens up the possibilities of using carbon in more powerful batteries, driving down the cost of portable power.
 
Lithium-ion batteries power many devices, from smartphones and digital cameras all the way up to cars and even aircraft. 
 
The batteries work by having two electrically-charged materials suspended in a liquid to produce a current. 
 
Carbon is used as one of those materials in smaller batteries, but for bigger, more powerful batteries -- such as those used in electric cars -- carbon is not suitable because of its structure, which cannot produce the required current density.
 
In the new study, Sharma and Manohar Kakunuri found that because of the shape and configuration of the tiny carbon nanoparticles, the carbon in candle soot is suitable for use in bigger batteries. 
 
What is more, because the soot could be produced quickly and easily, it is a scalable approach to making batteries.
 
When a candle burns, it gives off clouds of black soot made of carbon. 
 
The researchers looked at the soot collected from the tip of a candle flame and from the middle of the flame and compared the size, shape and structure of the carbon. 
 
The results showed that the burning process forms nanoparticles of carbon that are 30-40 nanometres across and are joined together in an interconnected network. 
 
They also found that the soot recovered from the tip of a candle flame, which burns at 1400 degrees Celsius, has fewer impurities like wax, making it perform better as an electrical conductor.
 
In tests, the researchers found the soot effective as a conducting material in a battery. 
 
The researchers now plan to develop a candle soot battery to test the technology further. 
 
The findings appeared in the journal Electrochimica Acta.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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