World
Nepal asks foreign rescuers to go, India lists assistance
Nepal on Monday told all countries to withdraw their rescuers from the quake-ravaged country as India said it had carried out its biggest ever response to any natural calamity abroad.
 
As the death toll from the April 25 disaster surged to 7,365 with more than 14,000 people injured, Nepal prepared to send home all foreign rescue and search teams.
 
Since search and rescue work was almost complete, the remaining task can be executed by Nepali teams, the Central Natural Calamity Relief Committee said.
 
New Delhi, which has deployed hundreds of military and medical personnel across the Himalayan nation, confirmed it would be pulling out its rescue teams from Nepal along with 34 other countries.
 
"Rescue teams from all 34 nations have been asked to withdraw as it is now nine days since the quake," external affairs ministry spokesperson Vikas Swarup said. He added that India's "relief efforts will continue".
 
The highest number of 2,838 deaths has been recorded in Sindhupalchok district followed by Kathmandu (1,202). Officials said 10,744 government buildings had been flattened. Similarly, 191,058 houses were destroyed.
 
Despite asking foreign teams to go, Nepal sought more relief material and funds from the international community to help the quake victims.
 
Foreign Minister Mahendra Bahadur Pandey said: "We need huge (amounts of) relief material to address the woes of thousands, including funds for rebuilding, reconstruction and relocation of thousands of structures and displaced people."
 
Pandey was addressing the diplomatic communities including the ambassadors of India, China and the US. 
 
In New Delhi, speaking on the occasion of Buddha Poornima, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said the situation in Nepal was "beyond our imagination" and said India would share the pain of the Nepalese people.
 
"I pray to Buddha that the earthquake victims should not suffer any more," he added.
 
In Kathmandu, the Indian embassy declared that New Delhi's massive rescue and relief work in Nepal was its biggest response to a natural calamity in a foreign country.
 
Ambassador Ranjit Rae made the observation during a briefing given to the Kathmandu-based diplomats on India's ongoing assistance following the quake that has caused widespread destruction.
 
"Operation Maitri" is the largest ever support operation by India in response to a natural calamity abroad, a statement from the Indian embassy said. 
 
"It represented not only the deepest commitment at the highest political level in India but also overwhelming outpouring of support from the people of India and over a dozen Indian states including those bordering Nepal."
 
He said the first Indian Air Force flight landed in Kathmandu with rescue teams from the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) and relief material within six hours of the devastating quake.
 
Thereafter, 32 IAF flights brought in 520 tonnes of relief material containing tents, blankets, medicines, food, water, heavy engineering equipment, ambulances, RO plants, oxygen generators, two full-fledged army field hospitals with 18 medical teams, 18 army engineering teams and 16 NDRF teams. 
 
"These teams have been working round-the-clock since their deployment in close coordination with the government of Nepal," he said.
 
Eight MI-17 and five ALH helicopters of the Indian Army, operating from Kathmandu and Pokhara, have carried 207 tonnes of relief material in 449 sorties, evacuated over 900 injured and transported over 1,700 stranded people of various nationalities, the envoy said.
 
He added that some 4,500 tonnes of relief material containing food, water, medicines, tents, blankets, tarpaulins and plastic sheets from Bihar and Uttar Pradesh had reached Nepal.
 
Eight fresh tremors were recorded on Monday in Nepal. A senior official said the aftershocks might last for months "and there is no need to worry much".

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Government rejects RTI query on Obama's visit expenses
The ministry of external affairs has rejected a Right To Information (RTI) query seeking details of the expenses incurred during US President Barack Obama's three-day recent visit to India, an activist said here on Monday.
 
The information was denied as "it could affect India's international relations", RTI activist Anil Galgali said. 
 
Galgali, Mumbai's leading RTI activist, had sought the information from the MEA on the expenses for hosting President Obama and his large contingent last January, at the invitation of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
 
MEA's deputy chief protocol officer Rohit Rathish declined to provide the information, terming it as "confidential and sensitive" with a bearing on India's future bilateral relations with other foreign countries.
 
Rathish explained that every year, the Indian government hosts dignitaries and delegations from various foreign countries, but each visit is treated as unique.
 
The type of delegations, reason for the visits, categorisation, organisation, how the visit is hosted, how many cities they visit and other details are different from each other, the reply explained.
 
Under such conditions, the expenses incurred by the government on each such visit varies and giving out such sensitive information could adversely affect India's bilateral relations with other countries.
 
Reacting to the MEA's denial, Galgali questioned the government's motive behind not revealing the expenses on such VVIP visits.
 
"The Modi government revels in claiming transparency in governance... But it is trying to conceal the huge expenses, raising the bogey of sensitivity and confidentiality. It is a matter of debate how revealing such information can hamper India's foreign relations," Galgali told IANS.
 
He stressed on the need for the government to inform the people of the country on all such expenses incurred from public money, collected by way of taxes from the hard earned income of the masses.

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COMMENTS

Yogesh Tiwari

2 years ago

I feel the reason given by the MEA is correct in this case. Obviously such information once out will make people feel important or less important based on the amount the Indian government spent on them. This would create a diplomatic gridlock, where every visiting dignitary would want higher treatment.

How to counter side effects of antibiotics

As a result of the intake of antibiotics, yeasts grow unchecked into large colonies, causing a condition called dysbiosis. These weaken your immune system

 
There are times when it becomes unavoidable to take antibiotics. While these may cure you of your diseases, they leave you with nasty side effects like bloating, belching, gas, constipation and diarrhea.
 
As the very name antibiotics suggests, it kills bacteria. Unfortunately, it also kills friendly bacteria which are so very valuable for your health.
 
Full one to two kg of friendly bacteria and yeast are present in your intestines. The friendly bacteria not only aid in digestion but also lend a helping hand in manufacturing B vitamins.
 
Not only that, these keep the omnipresent yeast at bay, thus fighting infection.
 
As a result of the intake of antibiotics, yeasts grow unchecked into large colonies, causing a condition called dysbiosis. These weaken your immune system.
 
Here are a few simple steps which can ease the situation considerably.
 
The first line of defence is cut out factors which forced you to take antibiotics in the first place.
 
Quit smoking and drinking. Dump all soda. Put aside those chocolates, sugary and starchy foods. Also out are dairy products, fatty and spicy foods, tea and coffee. Increase water intake.
 
Don't guzzle orange juice. Vitamin C is better obtained from oranges. Taking it through juices will only supply you excess sugar, which will rather worsen your condition.
 
Start taking probiotics in the shape of yoghurt on a regular basis, whenever you have a course of antibiotics. Probiotics must be continued long after the course has completed. Even otherwise, it is a good idea to make probiotics a regular part of your diet.
 
Fermented foods like pickles, pickled turnips and carrots contain natural probiotics. That earthy Kanji that your grandmother used to make will be perfect during your post-antibiotic days.
 
Eat light, easily digestible food because your digestion will be in bad shape for several months after taking those tiny pills.
 
Boil five mint leaves, an inch of ginger and about half a teaspoon of Ajwain (carom seeds or bishop's weed) in a glass of water till the water is reduced to half. Drink half a glass thrice a day.
 
Light exercise is equally important. What matters is regularity.
 
Another wonderful remedy in your kitchen is garlic. Allicin present in it gets rid of the antibiotics in the body.
 
Vitamins A, C, E, zinc and selenium are a great help. Aloe vera juice protects intestinal lining.
 
Make sure that you don't get constipated. Psyllium husk and flax seed will not only aid in bowel movement but will also relieve diarrhea by absorbing excess water.
 
Antibacterial oregano oil taken thrice a day provides considerable help.

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COMMENTS

Sudharshan Katipally

2 years ago

very informative, thanks.

Mohd.Tahir Sayed

2 years ago

Thanx for this wonderful information .
TAHIR SAYED

Mohd.Tahir Sayed

2 years ago

Thanx for this wonderful information .
TAHIR SAYED

Mohd.Tahir Sayed

2 years ago

Thanx for this wonderful information .
TAHIR SAYED

B. Yerram Raju

2 years ago

Very useful information for protecting oneself from excessive use of antibiotics.

Devang Doshi

2 years ago

Amazing topic. Keep writing on health related topics. You should also make it a seperate tab on website.

Awadhesh Vaish

2 years ago

great info

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