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Amul Paneer: Tastes bad

Not only is this confused advertising, it’s not funny in the least, and it’s in very poor taste

How can the Amul bhais make your kids devour more of their high protein paneer… which the brats usually loathe, or loathe anything that's 'healthy' for that matter? Well, one sure-fire way, according to the brand manager, is to amusingly scare the hell out of the kids. And their doting mothers.

In one commercial, set inside a shopping mall, mom and the kid are seen in action, topping up groceries in a trolley. In front of them is an India Un-shining chap (read: skinny and underfed). The kid does what kids do best in mall stores. He rams the trolley up the poor dude's backside, and the latter goes zipping across the marble flooring. The mom, instead of rebuking the kid for the prank, warns her boy that this would be his fate too if he doesn't start consuming Amul Paneer, like right away. In the other commercial, the same India Un-shining fellow is seen getting literally blown away when a table-top fan is turned on. Again, the mom points out to Mr Under Fed as a warning to her child.

It's all gone wrong out here. Not only is this confused advertising, it's not funny in the least, and it's in very poor taste. For one, the advertiser is trying to speak to both, the moms and the kids at the same time. This is dangerous stuff, as their motivations are totally different. (Mom would look for the health factor and the kids would crave great taste). And in trying to do so, it ends up pleasing no one. The slapstick humour takes the seriousness of the health story away. And the humour used is so juvenile, the kids will have a few giggles and then send people flying into the stratosphere with the trolleys inside shopping malls, but will completely miss the paneer saga. And will therefore continue to detest paneer while giving hell to people in public places. In short, bad advertising.

And worse of all, the advertising really lacks taste, whether the paneer does or not. Mocking at a malnourished man, in a country where a huge population is malnourished, is cruel and un-funny. What lesson does it impart to the already spoilt brats? That it's cool to make fun of the underfed? Should such communication be even allowed to run in the first place?

Net-net: Poor strategy. Poor creative. And totally irresponsible too.

User

COMMENTS

Shivam

7 years ago

Totally agree. It's offensive and conveys nothing.

ucd

7 years ago

Has the ASCI become toothless that offensive and idiotic ads are allowed to proliferate. The IQ of those who conceived this ad needs to be checked!

buzzz

7 years ago

Very well said Mr Anil.

For a company like Amul, which is respected for its great revolutionary operations and Indian roots, such an ad was uncalled for. These kind of 'cheap' ads are for newer entrants who try to gain some publicity for good or bad reasons.

Ads should also be targeting at highlighting the good point of the products, but in this case, it sounds more like an act of desperation. What are we going to see next - Dabur Chawanprash saying you will be ill if you dont eat me? Fair and lovely saying that you will be ugly if you are not fair? Olay saying you are an oldie if not using my creme? Amul saying that you are a traitor to your country if you dont use Indian AMUL???

Common Ad gurus... instead of maturing over the years, you are turning into cheapsters. The kind of ads I hate most are the ones which show miracles done by a product, specially mobile phones...

There is a greater need for an agency to monitor and control the message purported by these ads.

premsagar

7 years ago

The moment I saw this ad, I know Anil will not like this ad. Can't we ever take sarcasm and smile at it. Why do ads need an confimed protocol?

Why should all ads be sentimental , emotional and mushy?

The generation that buys the products are not Stiff.They know they are not perfect. They go about improving them than not cry at every criticism.

The flying guy is not poor, just under nurished, with not a good diet.

India really needs a "Grow up emotionally day"

REPLY

ucd

In Reply to premsagar 7 years ago

We are not asking for ads to be sentimental, emotional and mushy. We like them to be factual and directly promotional of the product. Making fun of others, specially the under-privileged is not ethics.

premsagar

In Reply to ucd 7 years ago

How do you infer he is underpriviliged?
He does not look shabby. He is decently dressed. He is a person with no proper diet.

All Fat people are not Overfed . All thin people are not underfed.

Paneer is not a cure for mal-nutritioned people. Also there are not many ways to show a healthy food spin of paneer/ cheese...

I feel you have something against the Ad agency.
For transparency sake, can ANIL detail the ad agencies involved in al these critical comments. I am sure you will see the trend then.

Jim

7 years ago

Dear Anil Sir,
At the onset let me confess that i have not yet seen the ads, but wanted to raise a question on are we as Indians too sentimental and touchy? We abhor companies who sell fairness cream, cant show humourous ads on specific communities, we raise diplomatic storm when some New Zealand radio jockey comments on our chief minister, we raise diplomatic storm when some Australian cops comment on Indians?

REPLY

UCD

In Reply to Jim 7 years ago

You said it all when you said you did not see the ad/s. We don't abhor this and we don't abhor that and it is not that Indians do not have a sense of humour (although some's is below the floorboards). But obviously you haven't seen enough these ridiculous ads to qualify to make comments!

B V KRISHNAN

In Reply to Jim 7 years ago

Mr.Jim, you are confusing issues. Here the issue is about the moral ethics of a particular ad by AMUL, not about what Indians feel about others comments. I do agree that we as a rule are an intolerant lot when it comes to adverse comments on our nation, habits etc., but that is not the issue here. Here a corporate company is making fun of mal-nutritioned and below poverty line kids, and it is not very funny.

Prakash Mirpuri

7 years ago

Yes! I am of the same opinion.
Amul should withdraw this ad immediately and apologise for such a negative attitude

B V KRISHNAN

7 years ago

How can the creators of some of the best pieces of visual ads in India, stoop so low! One reason perhaps is the keenness of the ad agents to somehow grab the attention of the viewer - whether by fair means or foul!

REPLY

U C DSouza

In Reply to B V KRISHNAN 7 years ago

You've hit the nail on the head! From time to time, ad agencies/companies become insecure about their ratings and resort to attention-catching gimmicks, whether fair or foul.

Five bull factors that affect the market

Except for the ‘secondary corrections’, which may happen in the future, the market appears to be on the rise

There are five major factors which affect stock markets: economic, monetary, fundamental, technical and psychological. Let's look at the current market condition based on these five factors.

Technical Factors: The market is looking positive, technically. The Nifty made an all-time high of 6,357 in January 2008 from where it crashed to 2,520 in March 2009. From there, the new bull market started and it touched a high of 5,182 in October 2009.

However, it consolidated at that level, moving in a narrow range of 5% to 8% over 11 months. In September 2010, the Nifty shot out of this narrow range and is approaching an all important level of 6,130. The market might decide to correct from there or keep rising. If it does correct, it would be a boon for long-term investors because it will be a secondary correction of the primary bull market. The correction could take the market to, say, around 5,400 or, in the worst case, to 5,050. These levels would be an excellent buying opportunity. In the second case, the market would break through the important resistance of 6,130 and would very soon make a new high and, most probably, move on to close to 7,000 over the next few weeks or even months and may correct after that.

Fundamental Factors: The Sensex P/E ratio is 15.8x FY2011-12E earnings which are at a 10% premium to the long-term 10-year average. The Market-cap/GDP ratio is at 1.1x which is below its all-time high of 1.8x touched in January 2008. The earnings yield ratio of the Sensex is 5.3% compared to 8% yield on bonds (10-year G-Sec) and the earnings yield/bond yield ratio is 0.66x as compared to the long-term 15-year average of 0.88x. The Sensex P/E is at a premium of 30% compared to other emerging markets. All this indicates that, currently, the market is fully valued or slightly overvalued. Is this over-valuation justified? The positive factors which might support valuations are: GDP growth of 8% to 9%; implementation of key reforms like the GST, Direct Taxes Code and oil pricing mechanism; FII inflows; bank credit growth; boom in capital expenditure, private consumption and corporate dividend payout; and a stable political regime. The negative factors are: fiscal deficit; higher inflation; social unrest; and Maoist attacks.

Macro-economic Factors: Macro-economic factors are important in predicting long-term returns but not really helpful in predicting short-term price movements. In fact, often, it is the opposite, i.e., the stock market is the barometer of the economy and signals in advance how the economy would perform. In January 2008, when everything appeared rosy and all forecasts of the economy were bullish, the stock markets were telling us (in fact, screaming at us by hitting lower circuits) that the situation was not as rosy as it appeared to be. First, the stock market corrected and then the economy slowed down.

Monetary Factors: We are close to the end of hardening of the short-term money-market rates; long-term rates are anyway steady, which is good news for equities. Hence, currently, the monetary factors are positive as far as equities are concerned.

Psychological Factors: Unlike the last time, when the Sensex hit 20,000 or the Nifty hit 6,000, there is not much euphoria, at present. The market has actually, and literally, climbed a wall of worry to touch these levels. There has been very narrow participation. This means that we have certainly not reached a peak. Hence, the market is well placed as far as psychological factors are concerned and it has to go to much higher levels until the current fear gets converted to greed and we reach some kind of psychological peak of thoughts, words, views and action.

In sum, barring the 'secondary corrections' which might happen at the current levels or around 7,000, the market will remain bullish.

(Mehrab Irani is an investment manager with Tata Investment Corporation Ltd. He has nine years of experience in investment research, portfolio management and investment banking. The views are personal.)
 

User

COMMENTS

k a prasanna

7 years ago

Most important factor - FIIs are here to make money, not for charity. Once they achieve their desired percentage, they start selling the shares then market will fall like pack of cards. FIIs are here because US and European economies are not doing well. Slight improvement in their economy is enough to pull out money from here. There will be sharp correction here.

Narendra Doshi

7 years ago

It will be interesting to comeback to this forecast & analysis once it is achieved, if & when, & then we will have to thank Mehrab Irani by those who believed & acted accordingly, now.

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