Citizens' Issues
MMRDA spending Rs76 lakh a month on Mono Rail security
MMRDA paid Rs75.96 lakh to Maharashtra State Security Corp as charges for security at its seven stations, depots as well as the Mono Rails, reveals an RTI reply received by activist Anil Galgali
 
The Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) is spending about Rs76 lakh every month towards the security of Mono Rail, its seven stations and depots, reveals a reply received under the Right to Information (RTI) Act. There are average 14,282 commuters, who daily use Mono Rail services.
 
According to a reply received by RTI activist Anil Galgali, the MMRDA paid Rs75.96 lakh to Maharashtra State Security Corp as charges for security at its seven stations, depots as well as the Mono Rails. 
 
Galgali, in a letter to Maharashtra chief minister Devendra Fadnavis, requested for relaxation on the security expense collected by the government. "This will lighten the burden of MMRDA and in a way can make Mono Rail project a bit viable. It is a public transport now. It would be easier for the MMRDA if the government stops collecting these huge amounts per month just for providing security to stations and depots. I have also requested the CM in my letter to stop the overflow of people sent in by the Government for this specific purpose as security should be provided only as per the requirements," the RTI activist said.
 
In another query, the MMRDA said during February 2014 to March 2015, the Mono Rail was used by nearly 60 lakh commuters, generating revenues of Rs4.89 crore from ticket sales. One round trip costs MMRDA a sum of Rs3,131 per trip and not more than 131 trips are done daily between Chembur and Wadala Depot. The second portion of the remaining work on Mono Rail between Wadala Depot and Jacob Circle is 81% complete and will be ready by December 2015. 
 
MMRDA was the system administrator for the monorail project, while Larsen and Toubro (L&T) along with Malaysian Scomi Engineering BHD were awarded the contract to build and operate the Mono Rail until 2029.

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NGO worker among four Indians killed in Kabul

Established in 1982, PRIA is an international centre for learning and promotion of citizen participation and democratic governance

 

Fifty-six-year-old Martha Farrell was to return to India from Afghanistan on Saturday but she died in an attack on a Kabul guesthouse in which four Indians were killed.
 
"She was the spokesperson for a training programme conducted by the Aga Khan Trust. She was in Afghanistan from May 9 and was to come back on May 16," an official from Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) told IANS.
 
Established in 1982, PRIA is an international centre for learning and promotion of citizen participation and democratic governance. 
 
It offers professional expertise and practical insights which are utilised by other civil society groups, NGOs, governments, donors, trade unions, private business and academic institutions.
 
The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack on the Park Palace guesthouse in Kabul on Wednesday night.
 

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Mystic Kullu Valley lures foreigners to murky drug trade

The lure of drugs and quick bucks also attracts foreigners to the largely unexplored areas of Himachal Pradesh where they have become part of unorganised drug cultivation

 

The inaccessible valleys and lofty mountains in the western Himalayas are happy hunting grounds for the cultivation of cannabis and opium, police records show. They are the country's biggest drug-producing areas with a considerable quantity finding its way to Europe.
 
The lure of drugs and quick bucks also attracts foreigners to the largely unexplored areas of Himachal Pradesh where they have become part of unorganised drug cultivation.
 
Police records show that there are 50,000 acres of cannabis under cultivation in the Kullu Valley alone.
In the past five years, 70 foreigners, mainly Britons, Israelis, Dutch, Germans, Japanese and Italians, have been arrested under the Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (NDPS) Act.
 
Two foreigners, one Dutch and another Briton, were arrested on May 10 near Manali town for possessing the MDA synthetic drug.
 
Former Himachal Pradesh police chief I.D. Bhandari said "the biggest challenge" is the isolated, inaccessible pockets in Kullu, Mandi, Chamba, Shimla and Sirmaur districts, where there are vast tracts of opium and cannabis cultivation.
 
"The lure of cheap and quality cannabis draws hordes of foreigners. For the poor locals, it's the most lucrative crop. Despite the efforts of the government to curb its cultivation, more areas are coming under it every year," Bhandari told IANS.
 
According to him, 25 percent of Indian and foreign undertrials and convicts lodged in the state's jails are involved in narco crimes.
 
The Magic Valley in the upper reaches of Malana, some 50 km from Kullu town, is known for cultivating 'Malana Cream', a prized hashish that is a purified resinous extract of cannabis, in the West.
 
Bhandari, who retired last April, said a massive crop of cannabis was destroyed by the police in the Magic Valley in 2010.
 
"Without the help of the local people, it's not possible to completely eradicate it," he added.
 
The involvement of foreigners in the drug trade in the Kullu-Manali area is nothing new. Some never return - they either disappear or marry local women, an official of the Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB) said.
 
"The police and law-enforcing agencies are not in a position to arrest such foreigners because of manpower shortage," the official told IANS on condition of anonymity as he is not authorised to speak to the media.
 
Former NCB superintendent O.P. Sharma, who was posted in the state's drug-producing areas, told IANS: "The international drug mafia is providing high-yield variety cannabis seeds imported from Holland and Russia to the local farmers. Most of the cannabis derivatives are smuggled out to countries like Israel, Italy, Holland and other European countries."
 
Politicians see an economic boom in legalising cannabis cultivation as thousands of families depend on it. They are, however, against cannabis derivatives.
 
BJP Member of Parliament Virender Kashyap said legalised cultivation of opium is the best option to check its misuse.
 
"There is a huge demand for opium in the pharmaceutical industry. If our farmers are able to meet the market demand, what is wrong in it? " Kashyap asked while speaking to IANS, adding that he's against the making of hashish and its smuggling.
 
According to him, some states like Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh have allowed selective cultivation of opium, which has greatly helped to strengthen the rural economy.
 
Echoing similar views, four-time MP Maheshwar Singh, a BJP rebel who is now Himachal Lokhit Party legislator from Kullu, said cannabis has been grown in the valley for ages.
 
"The extract of cannabis is the staple diet in every household. Thousands of villagers whose livelihood relies on cannabis farming will bloom with its legalisation," Maheshwar Singh told IANS.
 

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