Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Majority of the people do not wash their hands effectively after using the restroom

Hand washing is the single most effective step to reduce the spread of infectious diseases, but Mich­i­gan State Uni­vers­ity re­search­ers found that only 5% of peo­ple who used the bath­room washed their hands long enough to kill the germs that can cause in­fec­tions

 

Ac­cord­ing to the US Cen­tres for Dis­ease Con­trol and Pre­ven­tion, it takes 15 to 20 sec­onds of vig­or­ous hand wash­ing with soap and wa­ter to ef­fec­tively kill the germs. But yet the study which was based on the ob­serva­t­ions of 3,749 peo­ple in pub­lic restrooms showed that peo­ple were wash­ing their hands for only six sec­onds on an average. “These find­ings were sur­pris­ing to us be­cause past re­search sug­gested that prop­er hand wash­ing is oc­cur­ring at a much high­er rate,” said Carl Borch­gre­vink, the lead in­ves­ti­ga­tor. Borch­grevink and col­leagues had trained a doz­en col­lege stu­dents and made them ob­serve hand wash­ing in re­strooms at bars, restau­rants and oth­er pub­lic es­tab­lish­ments.

 

The study also found out that 15% of the men and 7% of the women didn’t wash their hands and among those who washed their hands, only half of the men used soap, compared to 78% of wom­en. Where there were dirty sinks, peo­ple were less likely to wash their hands and hand wash­ing was more prev­a­lent during the day. The researcher reasoned that maybe because in the evening the res­tau­rant-goers are more re­laxed. Also peo­ple were more likely to wash hands if there was a sign en­cour­ag­ing it. The study, published in the Jour­nal of En­vi­ron­men­tal Health is one of the first to take in­to ac­count fac­tors such as dura­t­ion of the hand wash­ing and wheth­er peo­ple used soap.

 

Borch­grevink, who worked as a chef and res­tau­rant man­ag­er be­fore be­com­ing a researcher, said that the find­ings have im­plica­t­ions for both con­sumers and restau­rant and ho­tel operators. “Imag­ine you’re a busi­ness own­er and peo­ple come to your establish­ment and get food­-borne ill­ness through the fecal-oral route —be­cause peo­ple did­n’t wash their hands—and then your reputa­t­ion is on the line,” he said. “You could lose your busi­ness.” Hand wash­ing is the sin­gle most ef­fec­tive step to re­duce the spread of in­fec­tious dis­eases, ac­cord­ing to the CDC, and fail­ing to do it prop­erly con­tri­butes to nearly half of food-­borne ill­ness out­breaks.

 

Courtesy: worldscience.net

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COMMENTS

Ramesh Iyer

3 years ago

Seems findings mentioned in the article pertain to the US, and not to other parts of the world, least of all, India. In India, we practice better personal hygiene by bathing daily, and washing our hands with water both before & after meals, and when we return home from outdoor work etc.
There is a perception that the French, followed by the Arabs are notorious for poor hygiene standards. So, in certain aspects we are indeed better off than the 'developed' West.

nagesh kini

3 years ago

Indians are traditionally prone to more of cleaniness beginning with bathing at least once a day in the morning and before any ritual, washing legs before setting foot in doors and wash both hands more oftener.

Rakesh

3 years ago

Quite an eye opener I must say when it comes to US.

Chrysler agrees to only inspect older model Jeep SUVs, no recall

The auto manufacturer stated that the vehicles had met all the safety regulations at the time of its manufacturing. However, critics had pointed out that because the gas tanks were placed behind the rear axle of the SUVs, the chances of the cars catching fire in rear-end collisions were high

Chrysler Group of the US has agreed to inspect 2.7 million older-model Jeep Grand Cherokee and Liberty SUVs which the critics say is prone to bursting into flames after rear-end impacts. Chrysler had earlier refused the safety regulator’s request to recall the jeeps, but now has agreed to check the vehicles, thus ending their differences with the regulator. The refusal was quite a shock to the automobile industry as they usually do what the Government asks them to do.

 

In a brief statement, the automaker said "Chrysler Group recognizes that this matter has raised concerns for its customers and wants to take further steps, in coordination with NHTSA, to provide additional measures to supplement the safety of its vehicles. Chrysler Group regards safety as a paramount concern and does not compromise on the safety of our customers and their families." He also said that if necessary, they will install a trailer hitch assembly along the rear of the vehicle which will help to manage the crash force in low speed impacts and will also deflect damage to the gas tank.
 

Critics had pointed out that because the gas tanks were placed behind the rear axle of the SUVs, the chances of the cars catching fire in rear-end collisions were high. But Chrysler argued that the vehicles had met all the safety regulations at the time of its manufacturing and they have also changed the design of the new models which have the gas tanks ahead of the rear axel.
 

In its agreement with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Chrysler is not admitting that the vehicles were defective because if he did, he would have to face many lawsuits filed by accident victims and their survivors. "Chrysler Group’s analysis of the data confirms that these vehicles are not defective and are among the safest in the peer group," the company said. "Nonetheless, Chrysler Group recognizes that this matter has raised concerns for its customers and wants to take further steps, in coordination with NHTSA, to provide additional measures to supplement the safety of its vehicles."
 

The dispute related to the SUVs is not new. It’s been dragging on since years. In 2011, a Jeep Grand Cherokee exploded into flames after being rear-ended by a pick-up truck at a stop light. A family of four died in the accident. The parents, Mark and Amanda Roe burned to death while their sons Caleb, 11 and Tyler, 4 were killed by the impact. Consumer crusader Ralph Nader called on the company to recall the vehicles, calling them "a modern day Pinto for soccer moms with a fuel tank located dangerously behind the rear axle in the crush zone of an impact."

 

In 2013, again two people burned to death in their Jeep Grand Cherokee. Jenelle Embrey of Linden, VA was riding with her father on Interstate 81 in the Shenandoah Valley when the traffic slowed to a halt on the chronically-congested highway. Suddenly, they were hit from the rear by a Jeep that in turn had been rear-ended by a tractor-trailer truck that failed to stop. Immediately the back of the jeep caught fire. Embrey's father smashed the window and rescued a teen-aged boy but was driven back by flames before he could rescue another teen and their mother. "Dad and I stood in front of the Jeep and watched in horror as the mom and teen burned to death. The saved teen watched the burning Jeep too as he tearfully screamed, 'Mom! Mom!” Embrey said. She had launched an online petition, hoping to motivate federal safety officials to order a recall. The petition has gathered nearly 1,28,000 signatures. She had also purchased space on several billboards in the Winchester area urging consumers to sign her petition.
 

There has also been a debate on the number of accident that has taken place. Embrey says the current count is 287 deaths in 202 fiery crashes. But Chrysler and NHTSA cited lower figures and claim that the Jeeps have a safety record comparable to similar vehicles of the same age. Moreover NHTSA issued a statement saying that it was "pleased that Chrysler has agreed to take action to protect its customers and the driving public" but said it would continue their investigation into this issue, pending the agency’s review of the documents provided by Chrysler in its recall action. NHSTA also added that the consumers affected by the safety recall and customer satisfaction campaign should immediately have their vehicles serviced once they receive a notification from Chrysler.

 

Courtesy: ConsumerAffairs.com

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