Companies & Sectors
Mahapanchayat demands CBI probe into Maruti violence

 

The Mahapanchayat that represented around 100 villages, said they do not have faith in the SIT and there want the CBI to probe the incident at Maruti Suzuki plant in Manesar

Manesar: Representatives of around 100 villages, who gathered at Dhana village for a Mahapanchayat, on Monday demanded an inquiry by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) into the violence at Maruti Suzuki's plant last week in which one senior company official was killed and 100 injured, reports PTI.
 
"We don't have faith in the special investigation team. We demand a CBI inquiry to probe the incident," said former Gurgaon Zila Parishad Chairman Rao Abhay Yadav, who presided the Mahapanchayat.
 
"We demand that the culprits, who committed the crime must be brought to book and all the workers who were involved in it must be sacked," Yadav added.
 
As part of a six point agenda passed in the meeting, it was resolved to form a committee of the villages to look into the incident.
 
Last week, Haryana government had announced a special investigation team (SIT), headed by Assistant Commissioner of Police Ravinder Tomar, to probe the incident.
 
Today's Mahapanchayat, in which representatives of around 100 villages, including Aliyar, Dhana, Manesar, Kasan, Basskusla, Kankrola, Bangrola, Kho, Pukharpur, Naharpur, Mohammedpur, Farukh Nagar, Nawada and Wazirabad were present, expressed their support to Maruti and condemned the incident.
 
It was also attended by district BJP leaders Kamal Yadav and Mukesh Pahelwan, Congress member Ved Prakash Vidroi and Amina Sherwani, Gen Secy IMT Industrial Association Manesar.
 
Yadav said that in order to prevent such violence in future, village representatives must be involved while resolving disputes between company management and workers.
 
He also said that "not employing workers from villages around the plant" was one of the reasons for the violence as "local elders could have always guided them not to indulge in such acts".
 
The Mahapanchayat said outside influence, especially "that of communists", should not be allowed in the affairs of workers union in Maruti.
 
It sought an investigation on the way how VRS was granted to former union representatives, including Sonu Gujjar and Shiv Kumar, who had led strikes in Maruti Suzuki's plant here last year.
 
As many as 30 suspended workers, which included all the former office-bearers of Maruti Suzuki Employees' Union (MSEU), had left the firm after taking a severance package of Rs16 lakh each.

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Is this how we teach medicine? The story of a Bangalore medical college

A private medical college, spread over 25-acres ran an advertisement for the post of “Project Director”. A candidate went for the farcical interview and noticed an absence of minimum standards of professionalism and hygiene


It was a scene straight out of the Bollywood movie—3 Idiots. The only difference was that in the movie, Boman Irani portrayed the arrogant, ill-mannered, egotistic, insensitive director of the engineering college. In this case, it was the chairman of an educational conglomerate located at the Southern end of Bangalore. The board runs an engineering college, a management college, a medical college and a hospital that supposedly gives free treatment to the poor. Named after a goddess, the medical college-cum-hospital is spread on a sprawling campus of 25 acres.
 
Niranjan Kelkar (not his real name) recounts his experience with bewilderment. An experienced professional with 24 years industry experience behind him, Niranjan applied for a job in the medical college that had been advertised in the newspapers. The post: “Project Director”. Niranjan had the skill sets and the experience mentioned in the advertisement.
 
Trudging from CV Raman Nagar to the outskirts of the city in order to reach the medical college took close to two hours. The lady who coordinated the meeting spoke broken English and better Kannada, but forunately gave him the correct time and venue for the meeting. Kelkar says, “I reached at 2pm for the interview scheduled at 2.15pm. There were 10  candidates who were directed to a huge auditorium. The interviews commenced an hour later. Some of us took a stroll around the campus and were shocked at the lack of hygiene. The washrooms were worse than public toilets.”
 
He continues, “There were just a few students roaming around in the campus in their white coats. Next to the auditorium was an anatomy department which prominently displayed the names of all faculty members but all rooms were locked. Opposite the auditorium was the anatomy lab where the college sub-staff was busy relishing an afternoon snack of onion fries. Barring a stretcher, the anatomy lab was barren”.
 
Niranjan was called in at 3.30pm. Just like the hangers-on with politicians, there were three to four men standing outside the chairman’s cabin sorting the profiles at the last minute.
 
Niranjan says, “When I entered the chamber, I saw a dhoti-clad man (the chairman) sitting on a chair and what looked like a personal assistant next to him.  I was dumbfounded to see a frail old man wipe the chairman's face with a towel, press his legs, arrange his dhoti and rearrange the cushion on the chair. No, the chairman wasn’t a paraplegic. He was as fit as a fiddle. As the frail man was doing these tasks, the chairman started firing questions at me. The annoying part was that he did not allow me to complete a single answer even as he kept on scribbling something on the resume.”
 
Then came the question of salary. The assistant, told me in broken English, “We look only at salary”. Niranjan wondered whether both these gentleman had even read his resume or understood his background. They were not interested. They finished their interview in 10 minutes saying, “We will have a second round of discussion depending on salary. Please note that though the designation is Project Director, it is an Admin Officer’s role. Since you have not worked in a medical college before, we will treat you as a fresh candidate”.
 
Niranjan says that he lost his cool after the way the duo behaved when he asked for their names. The chairman retorted, “Why you ask unnecessary questions? It is the chairman’s chamber and chairman sits in it”. Niranjan recalls, “They refused to shake hands. I told them that they had not understood my profile and were commenting on it without reading it”. 
 
On his way out, he met the lady who had called him to co-ordinate the interview. She apologised profusely saying that the chairman had already appointed a person and this entire tamasha was conducted to convince the board that the selection was based on merit. But more than anything, the arrogance of the chairman was astounding. Readers—if this is how he behaved at the time of the interview, imagine the plight of those working under him.
 
Also, the amenities in this private medical college leave a lot to be desired. If this is the state of affairs in this private college, imagine the quality of medical talent graduating from this institute. No wonder that there is no much anger and frustration with doctors.

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COMMENTS

S R Bala

4 years ago

Is it not prudent for you to lodge a formal complaint with the Medical Council of India or report to the Health Ministry. Writing articles here is not going to solve problems. You may just post these here for public awareness.

Subramanian Sankaran

4 years ago

Get on, get honor, get honest.....that is the motto of a majority of our entrepreneurs. Education is an industry and cannot be singled out for exception in this motto. We are going to see worse before the silent middle class is stirred out of its Rip Van Winkle slumber.

REPLY

Rajkumar Singh

In Reply to Subramanian Sankaran 4 years ago

Sorry, not understood your comments. But thought of conveying this to you for clarification, if it is possible!

Please, try to be specific and clear.

Rajkumar Singh

4 years ago

It is sad to note that without understanding the message which is being conveyed here, just like in Facebook, most of the readers have started commenting for (like) it.

No one questioned him, what was the necessity and why the original names were withheld, not to speak of his own identity?

Was he scared to get reverse comments or for only to collect the comments for some hidden agenda, to me, it appears to be for tarnishing the image of that institution, where his unknown person was refused a job?

We deserve a clear clarification on this.

Rajkumar Singh

4 years ago

It is sad to note that without understanding the message which is being conveyed here, just like in Facebook, most of the readers have started commenting for (like) it.

No one questioned him, what was the necessity and why the original names were withheld, not to speak of his own identity?

Was he scared to get reverse comments or for only to collect the comments for some hidden agenda, to me, it appears to be for tarnishing the image of that institution, where his unknown person was refused a job?

We deserve a clear clarification on this.

Monappa

4 years ago

No use singling out an odd institution. The whole country's educational system, especially professional education,both in the Govt and private sector, needs an in depth study to see where we are headed.

Are we serious? Then we should force the Govt. to institute an independent expert panel to thoroughly audit the system and come up with the treatment.

The institution mentioned looked bad but, there are worse ones. Do not be surprised if you find that there are event management organisations to manage the watch dog bodies' inspection time procedures.

These could supply patients to sleep in the hospital beds, staff from Professor down to tutors to fill the deficiencies and what have you-all for a price! The inflation rate in getting seats for some, so called, prized subjects is phenomenal.

Possibly, this goes on under the very nose of the "so called" regulatory agencies! The number of people in our country who can not be bought for a price are dwindling by the day and are threatening to be extinct. Sooner we wake up the better. We need an educational revolution.

In India any one, I mean any one, who owns an educational institution becomes a respectable educationist. Any one who makes money, means do not matter, becomes the leader and is respected in society. How can you change that unless society realises the folly and starts respecting authenticity?

Aravinda Baliga B

4 years ago

No wonder with the ex MCI chief behind bars this should have been expected! But it is shocking that it is in a metro like Bangalore. What about the colleges in hinterland?

Deepak

4 years ago

Most of Corrupt, High Rank officials, Industrialist Real Estate developers have entered education field in last 5 - 7 years. Which is the root cause of the problem.
Instead Govt should have given licences to Professionals like Doctors, Qualifilied PHDs, Professors, Finance & Physical Education (Players & trainers) also eminent Administrators from Govt & Pvt sector.
I think down fall of Indian Education is in fast progess.

Ramesh

4 years ago

For general public it looks like thrilling revelation. Believe it what has mentioned is only tip of the iceberg. Not only Medical, even dental, pharmacy, nursing etc etc. is much more worser than any one can imagine. If one civil engineer fails to understand construction, others workers can reduce in process while in health one mistake can easily cost life.

It all boils down to one single word corruption from permission, inspection, approval, admission, examination, annual inspection, affiliation, late admission, attendance, evaluation, students interest everything is corrupted. Don't expect mango after sowing neem seed.

drsharmilaraopn

4 years ago

What is your issue here?
I hope that the issue was bad toilets,and farce of an interview.
The fact that the Lady could not speak fluent english should not have even been mentioned.
We have had people comming in from the north who speak nothing but Hindi,
You are looking at administrative issue, where does teaching come in?
Was this guy in for a teaching post?
Aren't non clinical faculty allowed vacations?
Clinical faculty would be in the clinic.
I am presenting possibilities

Rajat Bhatia

4 years ago

Excellent article. An eye opener on what is going on with the private sector educational institutions.

I had a similar bizarre experience with a compnay caled FIITJEE. They invited me for an interview with the Chairman recently for a job as their CFO / Fund Raiser from private equity firms and for doing an IPO on NYSE.

The Chairman never showed up for the meeting despite my staying at the FIITJEE office for 2 hours. I finally told their VP HR, "How can a company do an IPO on NYSE when the company Chairman cannot keep his time for a meeting".

India has some serious problems in healthcare, education and infrastructure in which the private sector is simply there to loot everyone. The government is even worse.

Ravindra

4 years ago

The person who must have made money permitting this medical college, the exChairman of Indian Medical Council, Mr. Desai,who was caught and was under investigation for couple of years and just 15 days back was released without charges.

Satyamev Jayate

captainjohann

4 years ago

If this is the case in bangalore where private Medical and Engineering colleges were started by Politicos or their henchmen, then one can imagine it in Madras.This is how anbumani Ramdoss made money and also the former chairman of MCI

Mistakes emerging market investors make: The case of Poland and Turkey

Profits and growth depend on good management. Yet investors have the habit of lumping countries into categories based on vague criteria and assuming correlation across the class, a sure recipe for disaster in any language

Recently I read several articles on a popular US financial website owned by the Wall Street Journal which were on emerging markets in general and in particular the markets of Poland and Turkey. I found all of these articles rather troubling. They made two of the worst mistakes that investors and analysts make when considering investing in emerging markets. 

 
The first mistake involves using the tools that investors have created for developed markets on emerging markets without considering that emerging markets might be very different. This is especially egregious when the tools really don’t work for developed markets in the first place. 
 
One of these tools is the Dow Theory also known as technical analysis or chart reading. The Dow Theory was constructed from the writings of Charles Dow, the founder of Dow Jones. The theory became credible because it purportedly predicted the crash of 1929. Since then its results have been mixed. Since 1920, there have been 43 sell signals predicting a fall in the market of more than 20%. Of these, less than half, 17, actually resulted in such falls. Perhaps the real value of the Dow Theory is not that it actually predicts anything, but hoards of investors think it does. 
 
However, those hoards may live over the hill and far away, so their opinions may only affect a local market. For example Chinese investors correctly react more to pronouncements of the government than to any real economic or corporate news for the simple reason that the government dominates the economy. A similar situation is developing in the US and Europe. 
 
Markets are now less of a measure of corporate or economic health. Instead they are more attuned to pronouncements from the US Federal Reserve or the European Central bank as their unorthodox stimulus methods dominate economies. Yet the discrepancy between countries does not prevent prognosticators from making predictions using charts indicating obscure patterns all of which are basically meaningless.
 
Other tools have a better pedigree and are perhaps more accurate, but that does not necessarily mean that they can be translated. Analysts are quite fond of taking take historical trends and projecting them into the future. For example the combined amount of the BRIC (acronym for Brazil, Russia, India and China) contribution to global GDP is 20%, while the capital invested in their stock market is equal only to 16% of total equities, a spread of 4%. This observation is supposed to be helpful because the last time this happened, in 2005, the BRIC index rose 53%.The assumption is that the present valuation of the emerging markets is far too low and that eventually there will be some reversion to a more normal situation where market valuation equals GDP contribution. This is absurd. Stock market valuation reflects risk. Anyone remotely knowledgeable about emerging market understands that they are far more volatile and risky than markets with better information and better rules. 
 
Another large mistake that investors and analysts make with emerging markets is to assume that basic facts about demographics, infrastructure and debt will automatically convert into sustained economic growth. Then they automatically assume that growth will translate into profits for foreign investors. 
 
For example the articles about Poland and Turkey pointed to their youthful populations, low debt levels and expanding middle class as evidence that the countries were good places to invest. It suggested that any improvement in basic infrastructure would have a large impact on their economies.
 
Certainly these things are helpful for economic growth, but a youthful population and new middle class don’t always result in increased productivity or demand. For these things to translate into sustainable economic growth you need to educate the population and attract foreign investment. Many of the Arab countries have an educated youthful population that has been stymied by crony capitalism.
 
Besides, economic growth is subject to business cycles. Before the crash US consumers piled up debt worth 133% of GDP (gross domestic product). Now Chinese private sector debt is 127% of GDP. In Turkey and Poland private sector credit has risen by 20% in the last year. 
 
Foreign capital and good exports can be a double-edged sword. In Turkey 78% of all financing flows are short-term. So the country is exposed to fickle foreign investors. Poland has increased its export sector by 40%, but its largest trading partner is Germany and the rest of the EU. Germany in turn is dependent upon exports to its southern neighbours and especially to China. Turkey is in the same position as Poland in that it is dependent upon exports to the EU.
 
It is ingrained in every analyst that all companies are different. Profits and growth depend on good management. Yet investors have developed the habit of lumping countries into categories based on vague criteria and assuming correlation across the class, a sure recipe for disaster in any language.
 
(William Gamble is president of Emerging Market Strategies. An international lawyer and economist, he developed his theories beginning with his first hand experience and business dealings in the Russia starting in 1993. Mr Gamble holds two graduate law degrees. He was educated at Institute D'Etudes Politique, Trinity College, University of Miami School of Law, and University of Virginia Darden Graduate School of Business Administration. He was a member of the bar in three states, over four different federal courts and has spoken four languages. Mr Gamble can be contacted at [email protected] or [email protected].)

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