Low Speed Internet!
I purchased Reliance Wi-Pod WiFi High Speed Mi-Fi up to 14.7mbps unit for a one-year plan on 29 September 2015 with the payment of Rs7,950. The product offers high speed Internet up to 14.7mbps. This was purchased for a specific purpose which required high speed Internet. 
From the very first day of use, I complained to the dealer about the slow speed—average of 1.70mbps. I was told that my complaint will be forwarded. I contacted Reliance customer service on the telephone and the standard reply I got is that it is due to technical trouble which will be rectified soon. Another excuse given is that the speed depends on the network connections. 
One can understand this trouble at some other place but not in a city like Mumbai. A customer who purchases a product with deficiency in service will get stranded. Such technical trouble keeps continuing and the speed which I get now (on 2.12.2015) recorded on SpeedChecker is 0.07 to 0.14mbps. I would be happy if I can get even a minimum speed of 5.00-6.00mbps after 5.00. 
My complaint was sent by email and followed by a letter couriered to Reliance office in Navi Mumbai. A reminder letter was also sent after a week but there has been no response. For two months, I could not avail high speed Internet service from Reliance.
This letter may serve as a warning to people wanting high speed Internet service so that they do not fall prey to false advertisements as the cost of the unit and the plan, paid in advance, are not recoverable even when the service is not provided, as advertised. 
Will any Moneylife reader advise me about how I can be assured of Internet speed before buying a WiFi Internet high speed unit?
Hoshang R Nekoo, by email 



This is with regard to “Supreme Judgment on RBI Will Have Major Impact” by Sucheta Dalal. This is an excellent analysis by Sucheta Dalal. The Right to Information (RTI) Act has been a significant milestone in the democratic process of governance in India, next only to the ‘Question Hour’ in legislatures. The Act has proactively helped in improving transparency in the working of government.
There are a couple of issues which may need further debate, for which this analysis by Sucheta Dalal can be the basis.
i) Citizen’s right to information has to be protected at any cost and this landmark verdict should remove any doubt in the minds of those who are taking shelter under the protective clauses in the RTI Act. Like fundamental rights, this right also cannot override existing laws which were enacted after due deliberations at various points of time, before and after independence. I am referring to the impression being created after the apex court’s verdict (and the court’s observations flashed in the media) about placing information, obtained by regulators and supervisors of institutions in the course of performance of their duties under law, in the public domain. In such cases, the provisions relating to secrecy should be revisited and the extent and manner in which such information should be shared, and with whom, should be clarified. This should not be mixed up with provisions of RTI Act or powers of the CICs.
ii) The types of questions raised, or information sought under the RTI Act, sometimes put the government or organisations in embarrassing situations. A recent post on PMO’s website gave an indication of the nature of information sought from PMO under RTI. That is part of the evolution process of any such initiatives.
iii) Instead of celebrating the apex court’s judgement as a victory over the central bank, the verdict should be seen in the right perspective for making the working of government departments and statutory bodies more transparent and efficient. 
iv) After all, it is not absence of ‘information’ that is preventing the establishment or citizens from moving towards better and equitable distribution of resources or preventing corrupt practices across public and private sectors. It is the will that is lacking; the views of the apex court will go a long way in developing faith in the system in the mind of common man and creating the necessary will.
MG Warrier, online comment


This is with regard to “Aamcha Sexun Nahi!” by Bapoo Malcolm. The author is to be commended for clarifying a point of law. As he points out, often, this reply suggests the callous disregard of the complaining party. This explanation will help plaintiffs understand the validity of the response. 
Nevertheless, the same reply can be given in a more sympathetic manner, with an easy to understand explanation, assuaging the feeling of rejection and despondency of the plaintiff. But officialdom rarely bothers to exert charm for a non-VIP.
Meenal Mamdani, online comment


This is with regard to “Diagnosing Medical Negligence” by Prof BM Hegde. Agreed, Dr Hegde, India suffers from lack of doctors because of the very high cost of medical education and lack of teaching faculty. We are unwittingly getting into a situation where we would never be able to even ‘see’ a doctor without paying the fees. And insurance companies are waiting for precisely this situation. If medical education is made affordable, more youngsters would join and would be happy to serve the public. But this is a very distant dream. 
Hemlata Mohan, online comment


This is with regard to “Regulating Retirement Homes” by Sucheta Dalal. The concerns expressed are genuine. But is there a solution? If your own home cannot provide what you want, can a retirement home provide it, at whatever cost? Money cannot buy everything.
How can we expect any organisation to provide for unforeseen health issues of the senior citizens? Even health insurance firms are not forthcoming. Medical care cannot be an open-ended care. At best, they can shift the most hopeless patients to government hospitals.
B Pugazhendhi, online comment


This is with regard to “Cleaning up the Real Estate Mess” by Sucheta Dalal. The article is an exercise in futility. Builders control the purse of politicians of all colours. The latter will only dance to the tune of builders, when elections are near. The government and municipal bodies are full of people who thrive on the bribes provided by builders and they will always control the legislators and laws. This is an open secret. All elections need a lot of unaccounted money; this problem will not disappear overnight. So, unless the supply of constructed houses exceeds demand, it would not be worthwhile to hold vacant flats. Nothing will improve. 
CV Manian


This is with regard to “Who Am I? Where Have I Come from?” by Prof BM Hegde. It would be futile to seek answers for these vital questions from science with all its limitations, when so much of ancient wisdom of the sages and seers with their intuitive visions are available to peruse. Only scientific approach has been given an exalted status by ‘modern mankind’, in the human quest for answers to eternal and perplexing questions, when other spiritual and philosophical approaches are equally robust and consistent in their conclusions.
SA Narayan 


This is with regard to “Have You Updated Your Software?” by Yogesh Sapkale. In the first paragraph, the author has referred to laptops also; but in the rest of the article he has written about phones. I assume that the content is applicable to laptops as well. As per the offer of ‘free upgrade’ from Microsoft, I upgraded my Office Home 2010 and made a very big mistake. One day, after about two weeks, I could not open any of my files with .docx or .xls extensions. Each time, I was prompted to go to the administrator which asked me to buy some software. My brother then downloaded the open software, whereby I could open the files. And then the computer waved its magic wand; I could open the .docx and .xls files too.
Harish Kohli 


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Pranav Dhanawade scores 1,009 runs to create new world record

Pranav Dhanawade, son of a Kalyan auto-rickshaw driver, hit 1009 not out off 323 balls with 129 fours and 59 sixes to create a new world record


Kalyan-based Pravan Dhanawade on Tuesday created a new world record by scoring over 1,000 runs for his school Smt KC Gandhi School. He also broke the 117-year-old world record of 628 by Arthur (AEJ) Collins, an Englishman born in India. Pranav remained unbeaten at 1,009 when his school declared their innings at 1,465 for six, another world record for a team. No wonder, Pranav Dhanawade, was the top trending name in India and fitth top across the world on Twitter on Tuesday.

The 15-year young wicketkeeper-batsman was playing in the HT Bhandari Interschool Cricket Tournament organised by Mumbai Cricket Association (MCA). Pranav started the day's play on his overnight score of 652 and soon after lunch, achieved the milestone. 
His father, Prashant is a rickshaw driver and had been driving his auto some extra hours to support his son's passion. As per reports, Maharashtra government has decided to bear Pranav's educational and coaching expenses.
Cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar congratulated Pranav, while advising the new world record holder to work hard to scale new peaks.

Maharashtra chief minister Devendra Fadnavis also congratulated the young crickert for his amazing and incredible inning.
On Monday, after breaking the previous world record for individual score, Pranav told newspersons that he was just 350 runs away from 1,000 runs and would definitely aim for it. While scoring 1,000 runs, the youngster faced 323 balls and hit 129 fours and 59 sixes.
Pranav's marathon innings also helped his school to create a world record for a team's highest score in an inning. KC Gandhi School scored 1465 runs for the loss of six wickets. Pranav's other partners, Aakash Singh and Siddesh Patil supported him nicely and also scored centuries each. Together, they literally butchered all bowlers from Arya Gurukul School team.
Brian Lara's 501 not out is the highest first-class score, playing a County match for Warwickshire against Durham in 1994. Prithvi Shaw (546 in 2013) of Mumbai school had earlier held the Indian record for highest individual score in any form of cricket, when he bettered Armaan Jaffer's 473, scored in a Harris Shield match in 2013. Armaan is the nephew of former Test batsman Wasim Jaffer.
In June 1899, Collins, who was born in India but could not play first class cricket, had scored 682 runs in a Junior House Match. He was also unbeaten on that score.  


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