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Superstorm Sandy tops 2012 insurance claims

According to Munich Re total economic costs in 2012 from natural disasters worldwide including uninsured losses amounted to $160 billion, compared with the previous year's $400 billion

Berlin: Natural disasters cost insurers $65 billion last year, with the United States accounting for nine-tenths of the bill and Superstorm Sandy prompting payouts of $25 billion, reports PTI quoting a insurance company.

 

However, Munich Re AG said that the total insured losses worldwide were down from a record $119 billion in 2011, when devastating earthquakes in Japan and New Zealand cost the industry dear.

 

The company said total economic costs in 2012 from natural disasters worldwide including uninsured losses amounted to $160 billion, compared with the previous year's $400 billion.

 

Sandy, which battered eastern coastline areas at the end of October, killed at least 125 people in the United States and 71 people in the Caribbean. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut were the hardest-hit US states.

 

Munich Re estimated insured losses from Sandy at $25 billion and total losses at $50 billion, though it cautioned that the figures are "still subject to considerable uncertainty."

 

That made it the year's most costly disaster but several other events in the US meant that the country accounted for 90% of insured costs and 67% of overall losses, the company said.

 

Over the past decade the well-insured US on average accounted for 57% of insured losses and 32% of overall costs every year.

 

The lengthy drought that seared swathes of the United States last summer produced 2012's second-biggest insurance bill.

 

Munich Re said the insured losses, being picked up by a public-private crop insurance program, totaled between $15 billion and $17 billion most of the $20 billion worth of overall crop losses.

 

That was the biggest loss in US agricultural insurance history, comparing with average insured losses of about $9 billion a year, Munich Re said.

 

Severe storms and tornadoes in March, late April, June and July completed Munich Re's list of the five costliest disasters for insurers in 2012, each costing $2.5 billion.

 

Back-to-back earthquakes in northern Italy last May caused total losses of $16 billion, but only one-tenth of that was covered by insurance.

 

Deadly flooding in China in July caused damage worth $8 billion, but only a small fraction of that $180 million was insured.

 

Munich Re board member Torsten Jeworrek said in a statement that last year's heavy losses from weather-related disasters in the US "showed that greater loss-prevention efforts are needed."

 

"It would certainly be possible to protect conurbations like New York better from the effects of storm surges," he added, without specifying how.

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Companies must disclose price-sensitive info to bourses first: SEBI

The market regulator said it noticed certain listed companies giving monthly disclosure of their sales,  turnover and production figures to their respective trade bodies and the same is not disclosed to the bourses

Mumbai: Listed companies will now have to necessarily disclose all price-sensitive information, including monthly sales figures, to bourses first, market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) said, reports PTI.

 

"...all the events or material information which will have a bearing on the performance/ operations of the company as well as price sensitive information shall be first disseminated to the bourse as required under Clause 36 of the Listing Agreement," SEBI said in a circular.

 

The regulator said it has noticed certain listed companies giving monthly disclosure of their sales / turnover / production figures to their respective trade bodies and the same is not disclosed to the bourses.

 

The information considered to be 'price sensitive' as per the guidelines include, any change in nature of business, disruptions due to natural calamity, commencement of commercial operations, developments arising out of change in regulatory framework, litigation or disputes having a material impact and revision in credit ratings.

 

SEBI also advised stock exchanges to take into account the requirements of the circular and bring the same to the notice of the listed companies.

 

As per the clause 36 of the Agreement, listed firms are required to the concerned bourses immediately of events such as strikes, lock outs, closure on account of power cuts and all events which would have a bearing on the performance as well as prices. This has to be done both at the time of occurrence of the event and subsequently after the cessation of the event.

 

The announcements are necessary in order to enable the security holders and the public to "appraise the position of the the company and to avoid the establishment of a false market in its securities."

 

"In addition, the issuer will furnish to exchange on request such information concerning the Issuer as the exchange may reasonably require," the Listing Agreement said.

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