Citizens' Issues
LG has powers on public order and services issues: Home ministry
 A week after a very public power tussle erupted between Lt. Governor Najeeb Jung and the AAP government in Delhi over posting and transfer of senior officers, the home ministry clarified that the former could exercise powers on issues of public order and services.
 
“The state legislative assembly shall have power to make laws for the whole or a part of National Capital Territory of Delhi with respect to any of the matters enumerated in the State list or Concurrent list so far as any such matter is applicable to union territories, except matters with respect to Public Order, Police and Land,” clarified a home ministry notification issued on Thursday but made public only on Friday.
 
The notification clarified that the Lt. Governor remained the administrator of the union territory.
 
“Article 239AA inserted by the Constitution (Sixty-ninth Amendment Act, 1991) provides that the UT of Delhi shall be called NCT of Delhi and the administrator thereof shall be designated as Lt. Governor.”
 
The notification clearly indicated that IAS and IPS officers were administered by the central government.
 
“UT cadre consisting of Indian Administrative Service and Indian Police Service personnel is common to UT of Delhi, Chandigarh, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Lakshadweep, Daman and Diu, Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Puducherry and states of Arunachal Pradesh, Goa and Mizoram which is administered by the central government through MHA,” the notification pointed out.
 
“National Capital Territory of Delhi does not have its own state public services,” it stated.
 
The AAP government, which took office in February, has been asserting its administrative powers on posting and transfer of senior officers, particularly from the Indian Administrative Service (IAS).
 
The tussle between Jung and the Arvind Kejriwal government started over the appointment of senior bureaucrat Shakuntala Gamlin as the acting chief secretary on May 15.
 
The chief minister had accused Gamlin of lobbying for power distribution companies in the national capital.

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'Destruction of historic city of Palmyra has begun'
The Islamic State terrorists have already begun damaging the Unesco World Heritage site of Palmyra in Syria since they seized the 18 centuries old city, according to a report from the region.
 
Palmyra's remaining residents heard "large explosions" inside the ancient temples, according to the Samanews website, which is close to Palestinian militant group Hamas.
 
Most local people have left the area, the report said.
 
Unesco said any destruction to Palmyra would be "not just a war crime but...an enormous loss to humanity".
 
"It's the birthplace of human civilisation. It belongs to the whole of humanity and I think everyone today should be worried about what is happening," said Unesco's director-general Irina Bokova in a video statement.
 
Rising out of the desert, Palmyra contains the monumental ruins of a great city that was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world, according to Unesco.
 
Authorities managed to remove around 100 statues before IS fighters reached the Roman-era archaeological site on the city's southwestern edge.
 
Syrian state television reported that army troops and pro-government militias withdrew after evacuating the remaining civilian residents from the city.
 
The IS offensive against Palmyra started on May 13. The group has since captured the towns of Sukhneh and Amiriyeh and the al-Hail and Arak oil fields.
 
Dating back to the 1st and 2nd Century, Palmyra rose to prominence when the region was under Roman rule. Its grand, colonnaded street and ancient temples previously attracted thousands of tourists.
 
IS sparked international outrage this year when they destroyed ancient sites in Iraq that pre-date Islam, notably Hatra and Nimrud and smashed artefacts in the museum of Mosul.

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What Does ‘Made in the USA’ Really Mean?
Patriotism sells but the details may tell where the product is really made
 
Anyone whose seen Carrie Underwood’s “Simply American” Almay ad knows that patriotism can be an incredibly effective marketing tool.
 
 
Heck, some people are even willing to pay more for a product that’s advertised as made in the U.S. But what exactly does “Made in the USA” mean?
 
Is a product that’s assembled in red-white-and-blue Peoria, Illinois “Made in the USA” if the parts were manufactured entirely in Mexico? 
 
What if the parts were produced here in the States but the final assembly takes place in Canada? 
 
How about 60/40 U.S./Mexico parts and 50/50 U.S./Canada assembly? 
 
If a car is assembled in Japan with 99% American parts, is it definitely not “Made in the USA”? 
 
And if a product is manufactured entirely in Puerto Rico or Guam (both U.S. territories), is that product considered to be U.S.-made?
 
These are the kinds of murky waters we’re wading into when we consider what it means for a product to be advertised as “Made in the USA”
 
What does the law say, you ask? Well, according to the FTC, if a product is advertised as “Made in the USA,” (which can be done directly or implicitly using, for example, images of American flags or U.S. maps, or by describing the “true American quality” of the work) then “all or virtually all” of the product must have been made in the United States. But with no definitive definition of what “virtually all” means, there’s some wiggle room for advertisers.
 
The FTC takes the position that in order to advertise a product as “Made in the USA,” “the product should contain no – or negligible – foreign content.” That is to say, all significant parts and processing that go into the product must be of U.S. origin, and the product’s final assembly or processing must take place in the U.S. This means the answer to the first four questions raised above is “no, those products are not considered to be made in the USA.”
 
Oh, and that product made in Guam? According to the FTC, “United States,” includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and all U.S. territories and possessions, including Guam.
But what about marketing a product as something slightly less than “Made in the USA,” such as “Made in USA of U.S. and Imported Parts”? Well, that’s what the FTC calls a qualified Made in USA claim and it’s allowed when a product has a significant amount of U.S. content or U.S. processing but doesn’t quite meet the “all or virtually all” standard described above. Other examples of qualified Made in USA claims are: “60% U.S. content,” “Couch assembled in USA from Italian Leather and Mexican Frame,” and “Assembled in the USA.” The key to making a qualified Made in USA claim, though, is to make sure the qualifying language is not buried in fine print. It needs to be clear, prominent, and understandable so that consumers can make sense of the label or ad.
 
So that Almay ad at the top? It’s making an implied, unqualified claim that Almay products are made in the USA, despite the fact that an overwhelming majority of Almay’s products do not meet the legal standard for American-made. For more information about TINA.org’s investigation into Almay Simply American’s deceptive marketing, click here.
 
If you want to read the FTC’s Made in the USA policy statement, you can do so here. More on TINA.org’s coverage of Made in the USA issues can be found here
 

 

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