World
Japan's Yoshinori Ohsumi wins medicine Nobel
Yoshinori Ohsumi, a Japanese cell biologist specialising in autophagy and a professor in Tokyo Institute of Technology's Frontier Research Centre, was on Monday awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries of the mechanism for autophagy, a process that deals with destruction of cells in the body.
 
The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet decided to award the prize to Ohsumi, 71, as his discoveries led to a new paradigm in the "understanding of how the cell recycles its content".
 
"His discoveries opened the path to understanding the fundamental importance of autophagy in many physiological processes, such as in the adaptation to starvation or response to infection," a statement on the official website of the Nobel Prize said.
 
Because of Japan's 23rd Nobel Laureate Ohsumi's works, it is now known that autophagy -- self eating -- controls important physiological functions where cellular components need to be degraded and recycled.
 
The concept emerged during the 1960s, when researchers first observed that the cell could destroy its own contents by enclosing it in membranes, forming sack-like vesicles that were transported to a recycling compartment, called the lysosome, for degradation.
 
Ohsumi reasoned that if he could disrupt the degradation process in the vacuole while the process of autophagy was active, then autophagosomes should accumulate within the vacuole and become visible under the microscope.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Pakistan army fires at Indian posts in Poonch
The Pakistan army on Monday resorted to unprovoked mortar shelling and firing at Indian positions in two places in Poonch district, authorities said.
 
After opening fire in Shahpur area, the Pakistan army started shelling and gunfire in Sabjiyan area of Poonch district.
 
Police said 82 mm mortar shelling was started in Shahpur area on the Line of Control (LoC) by Pakistan army to target Indian positions on Monday morning.
 
"The Indian army effectively retaliated Pakistan shelling using same calibre weapons," a senior police officer said.
 
"While intermittent shelling and firing exchanges are still going on in Shahpur area, Pakistan army started shelling in Sabjiyan area of the LoC today (Monday) afternoon," he added.
 
"The Indian army is retaliating the Pakistan shelling and firing at Sabjiyan this time," he said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Pound drops in value as May signals 'hard Brexit'
The pound sterling was the worst performer among major currencies on Monday, after British Prime Minister Theresa May said Britain would kick off the process of separating from the European Union (EU) by the end of March 2017.
 
Speaking at the Tory party's annual conference here, Theresa May ended weeks of speculation and revealed that she will launch formal Brexit talks with EU leaders before the end of first quarter of 2017, meaning Britain is set to leave the EU by summer 2019.
 
The pound sterling was the worst performer among major currencies, down 0.3 per to $1.2938 as of 6.46 a.m in London. This was the currency's lowest performance since August 16, which has fallen more than 12 per cent against the dollar to levels last seen in 1985 since the British referendum on Brexit in June, the Independent.uk reported.
 
Kathleen Brooks, Director of research at City Index, said Prime Minister May's speech, which seems to suggest that she is veering towards a 'hard Brexit', is likely to come "at the cost" of a period of economic disruption. 
 
This is "likely to be negative for the pound," Brooks wrote.
 
But speaking to delegates on Sunday, Theresa May claimed people who talk about a "trade-off" between controlling immigration and trading with Europe are looking at things the "wrong way". 
 
"I want it [the deal] to give British companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate in the Single Market -- and let European businesses do the same here."
 
"But let me be clear. We are not leaving the European Union only to give up control of immigration again. And we are not leaving only to return to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice," she said.
 
The EU is the UK's biggest trading partner.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)