Economy
India's growth weak, price pressures rising, says Nomura

According to Nomura, the PMI, which fell to 50.1 in July from 50.3 in June suggest that, even as India's domestic demand remains weak, price pressures are rising

India's manufacturing PMI fell to 50.1 in July from 50.3 in June, due to a continued contraction in output and new orders. Overall, the PMI data suggest that, even as domestic demand remains weak, price pressures are rising and besides external sector stress, this is another reason for the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to remain cautious, says Nomura Financial Advisory and Securities (India) Pvt Ltd.

 

The manufacturing PMI fell to 50.1 in July from 50.3 in June, its lowest level since April 2009 and just above the contraction/ expansion threshold of 50. The decline was due to continued weakness in the output and the new orders sub-indices.

 

Weaker demand:

Both domestic and external demand weakened in July. The new orders sub-index fell to 49.5 in July from 49.7 in June, reflecting weak domestic demand, while the new export orders index fell to 52.4 from 54.4. Sectoral data suggest the decline in new orders was mainly in the intermediate and investment goods sectors.

 

Output contracts, inventory lowered:

The output sub-index remained below the 50 threshold for the third straight month even as it rose to 49.8 from 49.1, which indicates that weak demand, increased competition and persistent supply-side pressures are forcing manufacturers to cut production. The new orders/inventory ratio reversed after seven straight months of decline and rose marginally to 0.99 from 0.97, as manufacturers lowered inventories - the finished goods inventory sub-index fell to 50.1 from 51.0.

 

Price pressures resurface:

The input price sub-index surged to 60.6 from 55.9, reflecting higher imported price pressures due to a weak rupee. More importantly, the output price sub-index, which has a lagged correlation with core WPI inflation, rose to 53.4 from 50.9, as firms attempted to pass on higher costs, albeit at a slower pace, which suggests margins are under pressure.

 

Nomura said, "We are negative on India’s economic outlook due to continued external sector pressures, tighter liquidity conditions, weak growth and political risks ahead of elections. In our baseline scenario (70% likelihood), we expect repo rates to remain on hold this fiscal year and GDP growth at a below-consensus 5.0% y-o-y in FY14 (year-end March 2014), the same as in FY13."

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Fiscal deficit likely to worsen to 5.1% of GDP by 2014 fiscal end

The government’s continued fiscal indiscipline, before the election, is worrying and Nomura expects the fiscal deficit to rise to 5.1%, which would mean that the government is likely to overshoot its estimated target of 4.8%

Nomura has sounded warning bells about India’s fiscal deficit, which is likely to worsen, if adequate steps are not taken by the government to contain expenditure and boost revenues. It expects fiscal deficit to touch 5.1% as against the government budgeted estimate of 4.8%. It said in its report, “Fiscal pressures are building. The government is focussed on increasing tax compliance, but growth is very weak, asset sales have had a slow start and rupee depreciation has increased the subsidy burden. Unless spending is cut (a strategy used in FY13, but would hurt growth and could backfire since this is a pre-election year), fiscal slippage is likely.”

 

The chart above illustrates how reckless the government has been on spending this fiscal. The black line shows a steep increase while the revenues have plummeted. The gap between the two is inevitable and this could worsen if the trend is not reverse (i.e. if government does not cut spending).
 

With the elections coming up next year, it is unlikely that the government will cut expenditure. It has shown to adopt a pro-poor stance and populist measures are more likely. “This was due to both lower revenues and higher spending than budget targets. During Q1 FY14, receipts (revenue and non-debt capital) contracted by 1.4% y-o-y (budget target: 22.1% y-o-y), while spending rose 22.7% (18.2%). This was partly due to higher tax refunds and a spillover of spending from last fiscal year,” observes Nomura. This was evident when the Cabinet passed the controversial Food Security Bill, which is expected to put a dent in the country’s finances over the long term.
 

According to Nomura, fiscal deficit in Q1 FY14 was 48.4% of the full year target; this is substantially higher than last year (37%) and the five-year average of 27%. This figure has shown how rapidly the government has already spent for the fiscal year 2014.

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Number of bank fraud cases down but amount involved zooms 324%

Between FY10 to FY13, number of fraud cases in banks declined by about 50%, however at the same time the amount involved in such frauds increased by a whopping 324% to Rs8,646 crore, with public sector banks accounting for 83% of the amount

There is good news and bad news for bank customers. The good news first-the number of banking fraud cases has come down by 46.4%, to 13,293 cases in 2012-13 from 24,791 cases in 2009-10. And the bad news-despite the lower number of cases, the amount involved in bank fraud has zoomed 324% to Rs8,646 crore from Rs2,037.8 crore during the same period. In simple words, large value fraud cases are on the rise.
 


According to Dr KC Chakrabarty, deputy governor of Reserve Bank of India (RBI), during the past few years, banking and financial service industry was most commonly victimized by fraud, which arose with sweeping changes in scope and magnitude of banking transactions, the emergence of hybrid financial products, increasing trend of overseas transactions, and dynamics of real-time fund movement and transformation. He was speaking at the National Conference on Financial Frauds organized by ASSOCHAM in New Delhi last week.
 

Quoting from a report on ‘Nation on Occupational Fraud and Abuse’ by Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), the deputy governor said, “A typical organization loses about 5% of its total revenues in fraud each year while the amount involved in the frauds reported by banking sector in India has increased more than four times to Rs8,646 crore in 2012-13 from Rs2,038 crore in 2009-10.”
 


Bank group-wise analysis of frauds reveals that while the private sector and the foreign bank groups accounted for a majority of frauds by number (82.5%), the public sector banks (including SBI Group) accounted for nearly 83% of total amount involved in all reported frauds.
 

“Banking frauds can be divided into three main sub-groups-technology related, KYC related and advance related. The predominance of the new private sector banks and the foreign banks in the number of technology related frauds is intuitive as they lead technology enabled service delivery in the Indian banking sector,” explained Dr Chakrabarty.
 

According to the deputy governor, 65% of fraud cases reported by banks were technology related frauds, including frauds committed through internet banking channels, email and phishing attacks, ATMs and other alternate payment channels like credit debit and prepaid cards.
 

Association of Certified Fraud Examiners’ (ACFE) Report reveals that nearly 80% of all fraud cases involve amount below Rs1 lakh which is only 2% of the total amount involved.
Similarly, the large value fraud cases involving amounts of Rs50 crore and above have also increased more than tenfold-from three cases in FY2009-10 involving an amount of Rs404.13 crore to 45 cases in 2013 involving an amount of Rs5,334.75 crore.
 

“It is also important that we insulate ourselves from fraudulent activities by strengthening the fraud detection, mitigation and control mechanism through prompt identification, investigation and exchange of information. This is necessary not just for the safety of banks but also for ensuring the stability and resilience of the overall financial system and sustaining the confidence that various stakeholders have in financial system’s strength and integrity” Dr Chakrabarty added.

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COMMENTS

S BHASKARA NARAYANA

4 years ago

SBI has evolved a new scheme to fight against fraud prone areas, viz. VVR checking, means a voucher related txn (not card based, or internet based) put in by one checker is being checked by another adjacent checker within 15/20 minutes, keeping the customers in the queue to wait till the checking is over, mainly to check wrong posting to wrong account instead of intended account, thus stopping the beneficiary of wrong account holder to gain.
Let us wait and see how best it is useful in preventing the abovesaid large scale frauds!

nagesh kini

4 years ago

Anil Thakur is bang on. Invariably it is the top guns beginning with the CMD who are corrupt enough to sanction the loans that have turned NPAs.
The RBI needs to put in the public domain a listing of the CMDs and GMs proceeded against by the Vigilance and/or CBI.
It is pointless chasing the small fry who get punishment and the big guns the 'malai'!

anil thakur

4 years ago

Figures in respect of public sector banks shows that approx 65% of fraud amount during 2012-13 is involved in accounts with facility of > 50 cr almost all these cases are sanctioned by Top Management or Credit Approval Committee of Board. All sanctions have terms and conditions ensuring safety of banks money but if you go deep further u will find in how many cases facilities were disbursed without compliance of terms of sanctions, because field authority start getting pressure to release the facilities immediately after sanction is given. As Top Management is well aware of the fact that when account will turn NPA, field authority at Branch level would be responsible for non compliance of terms of sanction. If further analysis of these cases is done, we will find that all junior/ middle level management employees are held responsible for such accounts. Please find out in how many cases GM/ED/CMD are held responsible for such bad sanctions, Even though these top authorities are well aware of negative points in the proposal, but these are covered by putting certain conditions on paper only, which otherwise is very difficult for implementation. What we are seeing in case of Ms Durga Shakti Nagpal IAS of UP, same is prevailing in Banking Sector. All Officers who dare to challenge such sanctions are transferred or falsely implicated in one or other case and issued charge sheets so that he is left with no option but to run after their seniors and beg for minor punishment.

Khaja Mohiuddin

4 years ago

Frauds are committed with collusion of bank staff and officers. In cases of fraud, action is delayed result the culprit manages to escape and try to dilute the case, result others are being tempted that one can easily escape etc. One the fraud is detected, immediate action is taken and culprit is booked, and a lesson to all.

nagesh kini

4 years ago

Now that it is established that 65% are technology driven frauds, what concrete steps are in place to mitigate them rather than go whole hog into a 'chequeless banking' open to more frauds?

PATTABHI

4 years ago

Small-timers are protected against, but the Mega scamsters are having a field day due to the political connections.. one can imagine why all Political Parties are united in opposing RTI ..

REPLY

nagesh kini

In Reply to PATTABHI 4 years ago

Sorry Pattabhi
The small fry are prosecuted and persecuted not protected and the big guns go scot free for restructures !

Khaja Mohiuddin

In Reply to nagesh kini 4 years ago

Prosecution should be on war footing; culprits to be jailed pending investigation and their emoluments to be stopped. The probable culprit gets half emoluments during first t/3 years and later full emoluments are paid. This system to be abolished.

PATTABHI

In Reply to nagesh kini 4 years ago

Sorry, it should be "proceeded against" and Not "Protected against".

nagesh kini

In Reply to PATTABHI 4 years ago

accepted!

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