Economy
India seen to grow faster than emerging market peers
The Indian economy is at an interesting inflection point. With RBI Governor Raghuram Rajan announcing his plans to return to academia and the referendum in Britain voting to leave the EU, the world, it seems, has become more uncertain and risk-prone.
 
These events could make global recovery even more tepid. At present, a lot is happening in the world economy that has a bearing on the Indian economy. Amid all the uncertainty and developments, the World Bank has recently released the Global Economic Prospects (GEP). The GEP was first published around the time of India's economic reforms in 1991 and has some interesting insights in its June 2016 report about the world economy in general and about emerging and developing economies in particular.
 
The first of these deals with the growth forecasts about the world economy and the emerging market economies. The world economy is forecast to grow at 2.4% in 2016 the same as the previous year. The growth primarily is driven by emerging economies with a growth forecast of 3.5% -- up from an estimated 3.4% in 2015.
 
The advanced economies, similarly, are forecast to grow by a tepid 1.7% in 2016 down from the estimated 1.8% in 2015. South Asia, as a region, seems to be doing well amid the slow recovery globally post the global financial crisis. South Asia's growth rate is forecast at 7.1% in 2016, up from 7% in 2015.
 
This brings us to the second important point, which is about commodity exporters and importers. The commodity-exporting emerging and developing economies (EMDEs), especially the energy exporters, are struggling at present and have a marginally better growth rate of 0.4%, up from an estimated 0.2% in 2015.
 
In contrast to this, the growth has been steady at around 5.8% in the commodity importing countries and is expected to accelerate shortly. This is important as China rebalances away from an investment to a consumption-driven economy in the coming future.
 
The third important point relates to the second issue and concerns credit in both commodity-exporting and commodity-importing economies. What has been observed is that post the global financial crisis, credit growth has been most rapid in commodity exporting EMDEs, although they have had modest credit to GDP ratios.
 
In contrast, the commodity importing EMDEs have had considerably higher credit to GDP ratios but are now stagnant or shrinking. Also, most EMDEs are relatively safe in terms of reaching private sector credit thresholds. The places where a threshold of private sector credit has been reached are mostly energy exporting countries. Overall credit to GDP ratios in most EMDEs are well below the threshold of 80% of GDP.
 
Finally, with respect to economic regions and individual country forecasts, the report has interesting perspectives to offer on the South Asian and Indian economy. The former has done well due to a host of factors like lower commodity prices, domestic demand momentum and steady remittance flows. Monetary policies in the individual countries have been accommodative, which has been to the benefit of countries.
 
The risks and weakness in some of the economies have been due to a weak external demand, a challenging business environment, fiscal pressures and poor weather conditions.
 
India's growth has picked up to 7.6%, a 0.4% increase over 2015-16. India's push to draw more FDI is also seen to be a positive step. Also, business sentiment is up in India with many startups commencing operations in 2015. More public investment in infrastructure is also seen as a positive which could reduce supply-side restraints.
 
On the flip side, credit growth to corporates remained sluggish despite five rate cuts since 2015. Also, the decline in exports for the past 15 months is seen as a negative amid a harsh global macro-economic environment.
 
Despite this, the report explicitly mentions South Asia and India to grow substantially in the near future. In particular, India will grow faster than its emerging market peers. If the monsoons tend to be normal India may see rising rural demand which may fuel domestic momentum. Considerable challenges on the trade front and banking with stressed assets are some of the risks facing the Indian economy at present.
 
The future months will be important from the viewpoint of seeing how strongly can and does the growth rebound.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  

 

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COMMENTS

P L Despande pawar

5 months ago

Excellent piece of work.

It would have been appropriate to add a paragraph on future of precious metals in the light of emerging scenario.

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Consolidation in Indian banking sector risky: Moody's
The multiple downside risks in the proposed consolidation in the Indian public sector banking (PSB) space far outweighs the potential benefits, said global credit rating agency Moody's Investors Sevice.
 
In a statement issued on Tuesday, Moody's said the proposal to consolidate the country's public sector banks (PSBs) creates risks that -- in the current weak economic environment -- could offset the potential long-term benefits.
 
"India's banking system has witnessed an increase in stressed assets since 2012, with the result that no PSB currently has the financial strength to assume a consolidator role without risking its own credit standing post-merger," Moody's Vice President and Senior Analyst, Alka Anbarasu said.
 
"Barring significant government support to boost the banks' capitalisation, we believe the risks arising from the potential consolidation currently outweigh the potential longer-term benefits," added Anbarasu.
 
Moody's has released a report on Indian banks entitled 'Banks -- India: Consolidation of Public Sector Banks Will Face Challenges Under Current Conditions'.
 
Referring to Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley's budget speech, Moody's said the consolidation in the Indian PSB space is gaining policy momentum.
 
Recently, the State Bank of India (SBI) announced its decision to merge six banks with itself-including five of its associate banks.
 
"From a credit perspective, industry consolidation would strengthen the banks' bargaining power, help save costs and improve supervision and corporate governance across the banking system," Moody's said.
 
These potential benefits, however, are outweighed by multiple downside risks, the rating agency added.
 
According to Moody's, the banks' weakened metrics since 2012 and weak performance mean that many have difficulties meeting minimum regulatory requirements without regular capital injections from the government.
 
As a result, few public sector banks have the excess capital required to acquire meaningfully sized peers.
 
Adding to this financial pressure, all listed PSBs are trading at a significant discount to their book value, limiting their ability to attract external capital to support acquisitions.
 
"Therefore, Moody's believes government support will be a crucial driver of the credit outcome of potential mergers, particularly in the form of the equity capital required to shore up capital buffers," the rating agency said.
 
As to the challenges in consolidation in the PSB sector Moody's cited the potential opposition from employee unions, which could hamper merger efforts and drive up costs.
 
For example, SBI estimates that its merger with the associate banks will cost up to Rs 30 million due to differences in employee pension schemes.
 
The Indian government's ultimate aim is to reduce the number of PSBs to about eight to 10 from the current 27.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  

 

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