Citizens' Issues
India conducts surgical strikes across LOC; inflicts significant casualties on terrorists
India caused "significant casualties" on terrorists and those who support them during surgical strikes across the India-Pakistan border late on Wednesday, the Indian Army has said.
 
"India cannot allow terrorists to operate across the LoC (Line of Control) and strike with impunity," Director General Military Operations Lt. Gen. Ranbir Singh told a hurriedly called press briefing in New Delhi, soon after a meeting of the Cabinet Committee on Security.
 
The cabinet meeting was chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
 
Lt. Gen. Singh said, "Based on receiving specific and credible inputs that some terrorist teams had positioned themselves at launch pads along LOC to carryout infiltration and conduct terrorist strikes inside Jammu and Kashmir and in various metros in other states, the Indian Army conducted surgical strikes at several of these launch pads to pre-empt infiltration by terrorists. The operations were focussed on ensuring that these terrorists do not succeed in their design to cause destruction and endanger the lives of our citizens."
 
"During these counter terrorist operations significant casualties were caused to terrorists and those providing support to them. The operations aimed at neutralising terrorists have since ceased. We do not have any plans for further continuation. However, the Indian Armed Forces are fully prepared for any contingency that may arise," he added.
 
"I had spoken to the Pakistan DGMO and we expect the Pakistan Army to cooperate with us to eliminate the threat of terror," he said," adding: "It is India’s intention to maintain peace and tranquillity in the region. But we cannot allow the terrorists to operate across the LOC with impunity and attack citizens of our country at will. In line with Pakistan’s commitment in January 2004 not to allow its soil or territory under its control to be used for attacks against India, we expect the Pakistani army to cooperate with us to erase the menace of terrorism from the region."
 
Following the news of surgical strikes by the army across the LOC, the Indian equity market plunged. Both the NSE Nifty and BSE Sensex are down by 1% each. At 12.54pm, the Sensex was down 1.6% or 447 points at 27,845, while the Nifty too was down 1.5% or 127 points at 8,617 points.
 
Shortly after an announcement that India carried out surgical strikes on terrorist launch pads across the LOC in Jammu and Kashmir, Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh, informed key national leaders and chief ministers about the military operations.
 
Earlier this week, Ram Madhav, National General Secretary of ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has tweeted that the (Narendra) Modi government respects sentiments of all Indian with respect to Uri attacks and Pakistan will get our multi-level response soon.
 
 
After the announcement by Indian Army, the General Secretary of BJP tweeted...
 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Nilesh KAMERKAR

5 months ago

Jai Hind . . . Jai Hind ki Sena !!

Ad or Not? New York Magazine
 
This recent posting on New York Magazine’s Facebook page prompted a round of head-scratching among a few of its followers. But where some expressed their bemusement in “thinking face emoji” form, others were more direct.
 
“(T)his is an ad,” wrote one commenter.
 
“#sponsored,” added another, referencing a hashtag used to identify content shared on social media as paid advertising. (The magazine’s Facebook page has almost 3 million likes.)
 
The Facebook posting sends readers to a post in “The Strategist” section of the magazine’s website where a first-person account relates how Murad serum turned a face resembling “an overripe banana” into one devoid of the dark spots of hyperpigmentation. The author ends on this note:
 
I’ve added hyperpigmentation to the list of things I’m fine without as I inch closer to 30 — right next to diary and all-nighters. That’s what I call progress.
 
OK, but what do we call what we just read? In other words, is it an ad or not?
 
At the end of the post there’s a link that takes you to Amazon if you want to buy the serum, which sells for $40. Further down the page, a paragraph in italics says, in part, “If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission.”
 
So ad, right? Not according to New York Magazine.
 
“This post and the related Facebook post are not advertisements,” said Lauren Starke, director of public relations, in response to a TINA.org request for comment.
 
In fact, Starke had another name for the post.
 
“The post is an editorial endorsement, of which we do many, based solely on the product’s merits and the editor’s enthusiasm,” she said.
 
Sure, but the fact remains that the magazine is making money off these posts, which isn’t disclosed on that Facebook posting.
 
Insert “frustrated emoji.”
 
Find more Ad or Not posts here
 

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India lacks dispute-resolution mechanism over water: Experts
It is "crucial" for India to manage domestic water concerns for enhanced regional cooperation, opine experts, pointing to the urgent need of a "dispute-resolution mechanism" that engages multiple stakeholders and embraces an ecological view of the problem.
 
But given the scale and sensitivity of these discords -- India has seen a spate of such water conflicts this year -- experts lament the absence of a "proper environment" and a structured approach to ease the friction over water.
 
"Water issues are as much an inter-state (country to country) problem as much as they are inter-provincial (discord between Indian states) problems. In fact, the stress increasingly will be more on the inter-provincial sharing of waters, triggering friction between the Centre and the states," Uttam Sinha, an expert on climate change and water security, told IANS.
 
"For India, managing the domestic water concerns is crucial. It directly links to the regional water cooperation," said Sinha, a fellow at New Delhi's Defence Ministry-funded think-tank Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses (IDSA), stressing on a dispute-resolution mechanism.
 
In the aftermath of the Uri terrorist attack, Prime Minister Narendra Modi met key aides to review provisions of the Indus Waters Treaty with Pakistan and to increase India's use of the river waters. Down south, the Cauvery conflict between Karnataka and Tamil Nadu continues to fester. In the east, the Mahanadi river is a bone of contention between Odisha and Chhattisgarh while Bihar blames the Farakka Barrage in West Bengal for siltation.
 
Compounding the dilemma is the absence of a systematic response to emerging crises in the water sector, ecological economist Anamika Barua highlighted.
 
"The biggest challenge at the moment is lack of agency at the state, national as well as international levels to systematically respond to emerging crises and reinforce cooperation within the country and also 
at the trans-boundary level," Barua, Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at IIT-Guwahati, told IANS.
 
Advocating an "open, inclusive and scientific platform" where states can meet regularly, and not only during emergencies, Barua drew attention to the perils of excluding stakeholders like scientists and civil 
society from closed-door political meetings on these matters.
 
"Many of these conflicts are politically motivated, so it is very difficult to say whether they are real or political parties take advantage of opportunities when they see such crises," said Barua, who is also associated with the SaciWATERs Brahmaputra Dialogue project.
 
Earlier this year, India's water woes pushed the country to the top among 11 nations in The Environmental Justice Atlas, an interactive portal that maps ecological conflicts, resistances and environmental injustices.
 
"It's not just in India that we see these problems. Water has been a source of contention in the US and throughout Europe. And they have always come to agreements about navigation, about environment, about fisheries. It's in India that it hasn't happened. This country doesn't seem to be involved in (the creation of) a proper environment to settle these problems," former Foreign Secretary Kris Srinivasan told IANS.
 
"In China there is a strong central government which can lay down the law but in India, which is a federal country, states have to be involved," Srinivasan emphasised.
 
Even the National Water Framework Bill (NWFB) drafted by the Union Ministry of Water Resources, fails to bring in an adequate framework for dispute resolution, noted environmental economist Nilanjan Ghosh, who recommended a river basin authority (RBA) approach for both international and inter-state water issues.
 
"There is need for a basin-level authority with greater autonomy, greater powers, and which can initiate actions to prevent degradation of freshwater ecosystems and can initiate actions against all kinds of 
stakeholders, including state governments, for any form of violation," Ghosh, professor and head of economics, Observer Research Foundation, Kolkata Chapter, and Senior Economic Advisor, World 
Wide Fund for Nature, told IANS.
 
"We need to start at the bottom... go for a bottom-to-top approach in the river basins which we have not done at all... this means you start at the watershed level and involve the people at the grassroots," Himanshu Thakkar, coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People, told IANS.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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