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Bank Federation appeals CKP Bank depositors not to withdraw funds

The RBI action led to many depositors withdrawing their funds with about Rs100 crore being withdrawn since the administrator was appointed

 

Thane: Stepping in to support the CKP Cooperative Bank, Maharashtra Urban Co-op Banks Federation (MUCBF) has appealed to the bank's depositors not to withdraw their deposits, else a moratorium from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) was imminent, reports PTI.

Addressing the depositors of the troubled bank, Vidyadhar Anaskar, chairman of the Federation said that unlike some other banks, there has been no swindling of funds in this bank and the Reserve Bank recently appointed an administrator for some violation of norms by the previous Board of Directors. However, the RBI action led to many depositors withdrawing their funds with about Rs100 crore being withdrawn since the administrator was appointed.

Anaskar told depositors that the bank's position was sound. However, if the depositors continue to withdraw, the bank may face liquidity crunch and in that case, the RBI could impose moratorium and put a cap on further withdrawals. He also said that the Federation had never taken up the case of any co-op bank against which the RBI had taken action but in case of CKP Bank the issue was different and hence the Federation was supporting it.  The bank itself had also come up with an advertisement recently saying that its position was sound and the depositors' money was secured.

The bank had deposits of Rs1,023 crore as of March 2012 and advances of Rs622 crore and net non performing assets of 5.65%.

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COMMENTS

Ramesh S Arunachalam

4 years ago

Heard that Vakranjee has got the bid for Rajasthan and Delhi at 0.02% and if true, this is turning out to be a strange phenomenon. As a close friend remarked, this 0.02% makes Vakranjee own bid for Maharashtra at 0.48% a rather one. All the best to the BCs and good luck to the BC model

REPLY

Mandy

In Reply to Ramesh S Arunachalam 4 years ago

Authorities concerned who are a part of this process should be concerned at this trend. There should be a level playing field for all players. Right now there seems to be none. Hope better sense prevails...

shivaji D

4 years ago

Good for you Ramesh Arunachalam... the very fact that you are back in action is sending shivers down the spines of microfinance sharks who are looting people under the guise of helping them.

Their usurious loans and dubious insurance were already killing people. Now they are gathering here to post nasty comments.

Buzz off you trolls... go find someplace else for your dubious comments and tricks.

Moneylife... you need to find a way to end motivated comments.

FI Patron

4 years ago

Very unfortunate to see such a article on FI. The efforts that has been put by various stakeholders like RBI, Bank and BC from the past 6 years have been brought to a not by this tendering process. The author should find out who is to blame for such a situation rather then targetting the Bank and the BC's.

REPLY

Ramesh S Arunachalam

In Reply to FI Patron 4 years ago

Dear Sir

In the past, over the last year, I have been accused of being partial to banks and you say I am targeting banks. Please read my earlier articles on BCs given below

http://www.moneylife.in/article/the-need...

The fact of the matter is that banks were also hugely responsible for the Micro-finance crisis of 2010 and if only, they had proper internal audits of their own processes and portfolio (in Priority sector lending), ghost clients, multiple lending, overindebtedness, frauds and other such happenings would not have happened to the scale it happened. In fact, banks got the most out of micro-finance and MFIs got the bad name - in retrospect, banks were equally responsible as were the regulators.

That is why I feel that even as the BC model is starting out, banks and regulators must develop a rigorous system of internal audits and my next article focuses on that.

Thanks

Best regards

Ramesh



Ramesh S Arunachalam

In Reply to FI Patron 4 years ago

Dear Sir

I have written about what is happening in the BC space and the current low cost bids are certainly a cause for concern.

I have not targeted anyone in the article and all I would like to say is that given the present circumstances, the BC model cannot be implemented properly.

Thanks for your comments

Best regards

Ramesh

Sajid

4 years ago

May be true, but why blatant story lifting from ET? Firstly, with due respects to the author for the amount of experience in rural finance, what has been his contribution in improving the rural finance scenario. MFIs, though started on a good note, created a mess, BCs for the last 5-6 years are doing something that we as a nation couldn't achieve in 50-60 years. Over 100 million bank account holders! Yes, this alone is not enough, because transactions are key. That will happen in the next phase. RBI and Banks together are working towards it.

This article is not worthy of a person with such an experience. He should have taken a more positive view on how RBI and banks are working in getting banking services close to poor rural masses.

REPLY

Ramesh S Arunachalam

In Reply to Sajid 4 years ago

Dear Sir

I agree that MFIs started on a good note and then messed up. Why? The drive for commercialisation and scale (in the absence of internal audits) is what resulted in the huge mess and crisis of 2010. That is why it is very critical to ensure quality servicing by BCs and have rigorous internal audits of BCs - otherwise, the same mess that happened with MFIs will happen in the BC space. That is why regulators need to be proactive now with regard to BCs as they are were laizze faire with MFIs and they are as much to blame for the MFI crisis as the MFIs and banks.

Hope this clarifies

Thanks

Ramesh S Arunachalam

In Reply to Sajid 4 years ago

Dear Sir

Thanks for your UNKIND comments and I don’t lift stories. And if you compare today’s ET story where I am one of the few people QUOTED extensively, you will know that our analysis and approach are different

I use published news items for authenticity and then provide my own analysis. I have done that here and kindly mind your language please. Thanks

I have used ET to quote the bid amounts AUTHENTICALLY and then proceeded to give my analysis extensively which is 99% of the article. In fact, todays’s ET story quotes me and you can also speak to M Rajshekar of ET with whom I have had a number of discussions

I am sorry but I cannot write anything positively about the BC model, when none exists. And I believe that the BC model is doomed to fail for the reasons mentioned in my article unless there are course corrections. Make no mistake about that

Best regards

Ramesh

Ramesh S Arunachalam

In Reply to Ramesh S Arunachalam 4 years ago

Please look at my earlier articles on BCs (one which was published about 10 days ago and others some time ago) and you can see my broader views on BCs

1) http://www.moneylife.in/article/the-need...

2) http://www.moneylife.in/article/bank-bus...

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