Insurance
How Insurers Are Charging You More for Your Generic Drugs

The Affordable Care Act bans US insurance companies from discriminating against patients with pre-existing conditions. Some experts say insurers could be doing just that by forcing people with certain illnesses to pay more for their drugs

 

The Affordable Care Act bans insurance companies from discriminating against patients with pre-existing conditions. But some policy experts say insurers could be doing just that by forcing people with chronic illnesses to pay more for their drugs.


ProPublica's Charles Ornstein explains that insurers have long used a tiered pricing system to steer consumers away from expensive brand name medications. But according to a recent editorial in the American Journal of Managed Care, several prominent health plans are taking this tactic one step further and charging higher co-payments for some generic drugs.




The editorial's authors examined six health plans to see how much they were charging for generic drugs to treat 10 conditions. For certain conditions like epilepsy and HIV, some plans didn't offer any generic drugs in the preferred category -- leaving patients to pay more or find a new plan.


"There are a number of advocates that contend that insurance companies are, while not explicitly charging people more to sign-up or charging them higher premiums, that they're using the way they structure their drug benefits to in fact charge people with pre-existing conditions more," Ornstein says.


The companies say they aren't targeting patients with pre-existing conditions.
So what can you do to make sure you're getting the best price for your prescriptions?
First, Ornstein recommends that you carefully examine your insurer's list of covered drugs, known as a formulary, before enrolling or renewing your health plan. Don't just let your existing coverage roll over because you were satisfied the year before. Plans can change a lot from one year to the next.


Second, consider changing pharmacies or selecting a store like Walmart or Costco that have low-cost or even no-cost generic drugs.


Lastly, talk to your doctor. If your copay has increased, ask your physician for alternative drugs.


Listen to this podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud or Stitcher. And for more on how insurers are shifting costs to consumers, read Ornstein's latest report.

Courtesy: ProPublica.org

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CBI arrests former Odisha Advocate General Ashok Mohanty

Mohanty was arrested from his Cuttack residence in connection with a land deal he had done with AT group chief Pradip Sethy

 

The CBI (Central Bureau of Investigation) arrested former Advocate General Ashok Mohanty in connection with the chit fund scam case and took him on two day remand after producing him in the special chief judicial magistrate court. The CBI counsel had sought a three-day remand while Mohanty’s counsel had moved a bail petition.

 

Earlier during the day, Mohanty was arrested from his Cuttack residence in connection with a land deal he had done with AT (Artha Tatwa) group chief Pradip Sethy. He was brought to the CBI office and questioned before being taken for medical examination and later to the court. Mohanty was questioned on his purchase of a house in Cuttack from Sethy for Rs1.01 crore in 2013.

 

It may be recalled that the former Odisha Advocate General had resigned from his position earlier this month and had also been questioned without arrest by the CBI. The central probe agency had grilled him for nearly three hours over the procuring property from Pradeep Sethy, CMD of dodgy Artha Tatwa Group.

 

The AT Group chief had uttered Mohanty’s name during questioning by CBI officials. He had confessed that Mohanty had availed a palatial building in Cuttack free of cost.

 

However, Mohanty’s arrest evoked sharp dissent from lawyers as well as administrative circles in Odisha.

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Syndicate Bank CMD SK Jain dismissed from service

Sending a strong signal to bankers, the Modi government has dismissed SK Jain from his post as CMD of Syndicate Bank with immediate effect

 

The Indian government on Tuesday dismissed Sudhir Kumar (SK) Jain, the chairman and managing director (CMD) of Syndicate Bank from service with immediate effect. Jain was suspended on 2nd August when the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) registered a case against him for bribery.

 

"The Central Government in its letter dated September 22 has 'terminated the term of office'' of Sudhir Kumar Jain as Chairman-cum-Managing Director of the bank with immediate effect," Syndicate Bank said in a regulatory filing.

 

Jain was placed "under deemed suspension'' with effect from 2 August in the wake of his arrest by CBI for allegedly accepting a bribe to hike the credit limit of some private companies bypassing rules.

 

The two companies named in the case were Prakash Industries and Bhushan Steel, some of whose senior executives, apart from others, have been charged.

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COMMENTS

bharati

2 years ago

Please mention those charged and the exact nature and amount of the bribery and who stands to lose. This is an incomplete report.

Umesh kaushik

2 years ago

One Good decision.

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