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Heart attacks - not combat situations - killing 6 BSF men every month!
Poor eating habits, unhealthy working conditions, stress and irregular sleep led to 71 cases of cardiac arrest among BSF personnel in 2016 -- or six deaths a month, officials say.
 
In comparison, only 18 Border Security Force (BSF) troopers were killed last year in cross-border attacks by terrorists, the officials told IANS.
 
Although controlled by the Home Ministry, the Army trains the BSF. It is deployed along the 2,289-km border with Pakistan and the 4,096-km border with Bangladesh.
 
This is not the first time when heart attacks caused so many deaths in the border force.
 
BSF personnel suffered a total of 338 heart attacks from 2010 to 2015. This year, till January 29 the toll was six. Sixty-four deaths occurred in 2015, 77 in 2014, 80 in 2013, 46 in 2012, 29 in 2011 and 42 in 2010. 
 
The most number of deaths from 2010 till January 29, 2017, was reported from West Bengal (87) followed by Jammu and Kashmir (77), Rajasthan (50), Punjab (39), Tripura (30), Chhattisgarh (21), Meghalaya (19), Assam and Delhi (16 each), Gujarat (13), Manipur (12), Odisha (10), Mizoram (7), Madhya Pradesh (6) and one each in Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand. 
 
BSF medical personnel as well as senior officers are concerned over the increasing number of heart attack deaths and say the trend can be reversed only if the troopers become better aware of, and lead, a positive lifestyle.
 
"Cardiac arrest has been a serious concern in the BSF for years," BSF spokesperson Subhendu Bhardwaj told IANS.
 
"We have taken several measures to curb this. But at the end, it depends on a trooper -- how he leads his life. Awareness of what to do and what not to do is a basic problem," he added.
 
The major problems BSF doctors have come across in the force include, surprisingly, bingeing and slip-ups vis-a-vis weight, although the men do a hard job along the border. 
 
Bhardwaj said the force compiles an annual report on the health status of the troopers and takes preventive steps on the direction of its medical teams.
 
"All our men, including seniors, have to undergo an annual medical check-up called SHAPE. They are put in different categories after this and advised to change their habits accordingly," the officer said.
 
Officers admit that work stress and irregular sleeping habits are additional problems. 
 
The re-use of edible oil and aluminium cooking utensils have been banned in the BSF to curb the heart attack incidents and the troopers are told to do yoga and exercises to get fit.
 
A report by BSF Chief Medical Superintendent Rajneesh Sharna mentions unhealthy food, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, drinking alcohol and stress as some of the major reasons leading to lifestyle diseases. 
 
"We suggest several preventions to cure diabetes, chronic liver disease, chronic renal failure and more," he said.
 
"This is essential for maintaining a healthy body weight, moderate level of physical activity on a regular basis (at least 3-5 days in a week for 30 minutes), avoid use of all forms of tobacco and alcohol, choosing a cardiac-friendly diet, stress management, informative sessions and compulsory medical examinations," Sharna told IANS. 
 
With a 270,000 strong force, the BSF is the second-largest paramilitary force in India after the Central Reserve Police Force. Officials say it is a must that its men -- and women -- always stay fit.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  

 

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3D-printed vertebrae helps Indian woman walk again
Offering hope for those suffering from spine-related problems, surgeons at a leading hospital here on Wednesday announced they have successfully implanted for the first time a 3D-printed vertebrae in a 32-year-old woman, helping her walk again after a bout of disabling spinal tuberculosis.
 
The team of surgeons from Medanta-The Medicity, Gurugram, replaced the damaged vertebrae with a 3D-printed titanium vertebrae to bridge the gap between the first and fourth cervical vertebrae.
 
"Given the complexity of this case, the use of 3D-printing technology has helped us in bringing a successful outcome. The patient today on 12 post-operative days is now walking with minimal support, all her pain has gone, her voice and dysphasia has recovered completely and, most importantly, her life was saved by this technique," Dr V Anand Naik, Senior Consultant (Spine Surgery), Bone & Joint Institute at Medanta who led the team of surgeons, told IANS.
 
The 10-hour-long surgery is the first-of-its-kind for reconstruction with 3D-printed vertebrae in India and third in the world, following similar surgeries that were conducted in China and Australia for different parts of the spine.
 
"This is the first such surgery in India and probably third in the world by using 3D-printing technology. These techniques have opened a new avenue wherein any type of complex reconstruction can be done in the spine with less collateral damages," Dr Naik added.
 
A teacher by profession, the woman was battling infertility and she suffered tuberculosis (TB) due to high intake of steroid which lowered her immunity to a level where the patient developed TB at 10 different vertebrae in the spine. 
 
The first, second and third cervical vertebrae were severely damaged up to an extent that there was no skeletal support available between the skull and the lower cervical spine -- a disconnect between the skull and lower part of the spine.
 
As a result, the head of the patient was sliding forward and curved in such a way that it was causing obstruction to the spinal cord.
 
It resulted in progressive weakness in all the limbs and increased the risk of quadriplegia, a condition linked to compression of the respiratory nerves that could lead to death.
 
The team of surgeons at Medanta used an intricate computer software to plan every detail of the operation. 
 
The titanium cage was customised according to the patient's original spine. 
 
The high-resolution CT and MRI scans of the patient spine were uploaded on the software and a dummy of the patient's spine was 3D printed to measure the gaps and surgical resection between the first and the fourth cervical vertebrae. 
 
Finally, the three-dimensional titanium implant was printed, which was to be placed in the body. 
 
The printed 3D titanium vertebrae were further tested for biomechanics and stress risers after receiving inputs from design teams in India, Sweden and the US, Medanta said.
 
The patient is now recovering fast with the newly-reconstructed cervical vertebrae, according to the doctors. 
 
"We are extremely happy with the results as the patient is gradually moving back to normalcy," said S.K.S. Marya, Chairman, Institute of Bone & Joint at Medanta.
 
The patient is expected to lead an independent risk-free life in about two weeks, according to the doctors.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  

 

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