Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Here's how human brain can handle so much data
Researchers led by an Indian-origin scientist from Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered how humans can categorise data using less than one percent of the original information.
 
They validated an algorithm to explain human learning -- a method that also can be used for machine learning, data analysis and computer vision.
 
“How do we make sense of so much data around us, of so many different types, so quickly and robustly?" said Santosh Vempala, distinguished professor of computer science.
 
“At a fundamental level, how do humans begin to do that? It's a computational problem,” he asked.
 
Vempala and colleagues presented test subjects with original, abstract images and then asked whether they could correctly identify that same image when randomly shown just a small portion of it.
 
“We hypothesised that random projection could be one way humans learn," said Rosa Arriaga, senior research scientist and developmental psychologist
 
“The prediction was right. Just 0.15 percent of the total data is enough for humans,” she added.
 
Next, researchers tested a computational algorithm to allow machines to complete the same tests.
 
Machines performed as well as humans, which provides a new understanding of how humans learn.
 
“We found evidence that, in fact, the human and the machine's neural network behave very similarly," Arriaga noted.
 
It is believed to be the first study of “random projection,” the core component of the researchers' theory, with human subjects.
 
“We were surprised by how close the performance was between extremely simple neural networks and humans," Vempala said.
 
“This fascinating paper introduces a localised random projection that compresses images while still making it possible for humans and machines to distinguish broad categories,” explained Sanjoy Dasgupta, professor of computer science and engineering at the University of California-San Diego.
 
The results were published in the journal Neural Computation (MIT press).
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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When it comes to privacy, people are info-egoists!
Do you value your friends' private information on social media as much as your own? Most likely not, says a new study, suggesting that when it comes to their privacy, people are info-egoists.
 
People are much more concerned about sharing their own private information with third-party app developers than they are about revealing their friends' data, the study said.
 
However, as social media makes data increasingly interconnected, preserving one's own privacy while ignoring the privacy rights of others may make everybody's data more vulnerable, said Jens Grossklags, assistant professor of information sciences and technology at Pennsylvania State University in the US.
 
"The problem is becoming known as interdependent privacy," Grossklags said. 
 
"The privacy of individual consumers does not only depend on their own decisions, but is also affected by the actions of others," Grossklags pointed out.
 
In the study, the researchers measured the economic value of personal information which individuals place on their own and other's information. 
 
The participants valued the data in their own social media profiles at $2.31 and their friends' data at $1.56 when friends' data was irrelevant to a third party app's function. 
 
When friends' data was necessary for app function, the participants valued their own data at $2.04 and their friends' data at just 98 cents.
 
The researchers estimated that the average Facebook user, for example, with an average of more than 300 friends, would value the bundle of friends' data at less than a cent per friend when data collection is necessary. 
 
When data collection is unnecessary, people value the information for a single friend at less than three cents.
 
The researchers collected data from about 400 users of Mechanical Turk, a crowdsourced marketplace that allows members to earn money for completing various tasks. 
 
The findings were presented at the International Conference on Information Systems in Fort Worth, Texas, US.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Excise duty hiked on petrol, diesel to fetch Rs.2,500 crore
 With the Indian basket of crude oils going below $35 a barrel, the government on Wednesday hiked excise duty on petrol by 30 paise a litre and on diesel by Rs.1.17 to gather additional revenue of Rs.2,500 crore.
 
Basic excise on unbranded petrol has been increased from Rs.7.06 per litre to Rs.7.36, and on unbranded diesel from Rs.4.66 per litre to Rs.5.83.
 
Finance minister Arun Jaitley said the increase in duty will yield an additional Rs.2,500 crore in the remainder of the current fiscal up to end-March 2016.
 
Along with other levies, the total cess on unbranded, or normal, petrol will come to Rs.19.36 per litre as against Rs.19.06 currently.
 
On unbranded diesel, the total excise duty, after including special excise duty, will be Rs.11.83 per litre as compared to the current Rs.10.66.
 
The basic excise duty on branded petrol has been raised from Rs.8.24 per litre to Rs.8.54, and on branded diesel from Rs.7.02 to Rs.8.19 per litre.
 
Excise duty was last raised on petrol by Rs.1.60 per litre and on diesel by 30 paise a litre.
 
State-run Indian Oil Corp (IOC) has announced price cuts on petrol by 50 paise a litre, and of diesel by 46 paise in Delhi, with corresponding decrease in other states, effective from Wednesday.
 
The oil marketer said that allowing for local levies, the price of petrol per litre from Wednesday will be Rs.59.98 in Delhi, Rs.65.53 in Kolkata, Rs.67.04 in Mumbai and Rs.60.28 in Chennai.
 
Diesel will cost Rs.46.09 a litre in Delhi, Rs.49.70 in Kolkata, Rs.53.28 in Mumbai and Rs.47.28 in Chennai.
 
The Indian basket of crude oils, comprising 73 percent sour-grade Dubai and Oman crudes, and the balance in sweet-grade Brent, plunged to $34.25 on Tuesday for a barrel of 159 litres, as per data compiled by the state-run Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

Kanchan Kumar

1 year ago

The benefits of falling crude oil should have been passed on to the consumers, especially when petrol in India is deregulated. In US, price of gasoline (petrol) has fallen from $3.32 to $2 a gallon (equivalent to Rs. 35 a litre), lowest since 2009. But in Mumbai, you pay almost double. Increase in tax rates on petroleum products takes away the benefits of low crude oil price.

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