Nation
Here is the list of ministers in Modi government
Rajnath-Home, Sushma-External Affairs, Jaitley-Finance, Corporate Affairs and Defence, Gadkari-Road Transport and Highways, DV Sadananda Gowda-Railways are some of the prominent ministers in Narendra Modi government
 
As expected, Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) president Rajnath Singh got home ministry and Sushma Swaraj the external affairs portfolio. However, Arun Jaitley and Venkaiah Naidu are the luckiest among other ministers and would be looking after three ministries, each. While Jaitley got finance, corporate affairs and defence, Naidu would look after urban development, housing and urban poverty alleviation and parliamentary affairs.
 
Nitin Gadkari is the new minister for road transport and highways as well as shipping. DV Sadananda Gowda got the railways ministry, while Uma Bharti is the new minister for water resources, river development and Ganga rejuvenation.
 
Here is the list of ministers and their portfolio....
 
1. Narendra Modi Prime Minister Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions
Department of Atomic Energy
Department of Space
All important policy issues and all other portfolios not allocated to any Minister
 
CABINET MINISTERS
 
1. Raj Nath Singh Home Affairs
2. Sushma Swaraj External Affairs Overseas Indian Affairs
3. Arun Jaitley Finance
Corporate Affairs
Defence
4. M Venkaiah Naidu Urban Development
Housing and Urban Poverty
Alleviation
Parliamentary Affairs
5. Nitin Jairam Gadkari Road Transport and Highways Shipping
6. DV Sadananda Gowda Railways
7. Uma Bharati Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation
8. Dr Najma A. Heptulla Minority Affairs
9. Gopinath Munde Rural Development
Panchayati Raj
Drinking Water and Sanitation
10. Ramvilas Paswan Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution
11. Kalraj Mishra Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises
12. Maneka Sanjay Gandhi Women and Child Development
13. Ananthkumar Chemicals and Fertilizers
14. Ravi Shankar Prasad Communications and Information Technology
Law and Justice
15. Ashok Gajapathi Raju Pusapati Civil Aviation
16. Anant Geete Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
17. Harsimrat Kaur Badal Food Processing Industries
18. Narendra Singh Tomar Mines
Steel
Labour and Employment
19. Jual Oram Tribal Affairs
20. Radha Mohan Singh Agriculture
21. Thaawar Chand Gehlot Social Justice and Empowerment
22. Smriti Zubin Irani Human Resource Development
23. Dr Harsh Vardhan Health and Family Welfare

 

MINISTERS OF STATE

 

1. Gen (retd) VK Singh Development of North Eastern Region(Independent Charge)
External Affairs
Overseas Indian Affairs
2. Inderjit Singh Rao Planning (Independent Charge)
Statistics and Programme Implementation (Independent Charge)
Defence
3. Santosh Kumar Gangwar Textiles (Independent Charge)
Parliamentary Affairs
Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation
4. Shripad Yesso Naik Culture (Independent Charge)
Tourism (Independent Charge)
5. Dharmendra Pradhan Petroleum and Natural Gas (Independent Charge)
6. Sarbananda Sonowal Skill Development, Entrepreneurship, Youth Affairs and Sports (Independent Charge)
7. Prakash Javadekar Information and Broadcasting (Independent Charge)
Environment, Forest and Climate Change (Independent Charge)
Parliamentary Affairs
8. Piyush Goyal Power (Independent Charge)
Coal (Independent Charge)
New and Renewable Energy (Independent Charge)
9. Dr Jitendra Singh Science and Technology (Independent Charge)
Earth Sciences (Independent Charge)
Prime Minister Office Personnel, Public Grievances & Pensions
Department of Atomic Energy Department of Space
10. Nirmala Sitharaman Commerce and Industry (Independent Charge)
Finance
Corporate Affairs
11. GM Siddeshwara Civil Aviation
12. Manoj Sinha Railways
13. Nihalchand Chemicals and Fertilizers
14. Upendra Kushwaha Rural Development
Panchayati Raj
Drinking Water and Sanitation
15. Radhakrishnan P Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises
16. Kiren Rijiju Home Affairs
17. Krishan Pal Road Transport and Highways
Shipping
18. Dr Sanjeev Kumar Balyan Agriculture
Food Processing Industries
19. Mansukhbhai Dhanjibhai Vasava Tribal Affairs
20. Raosaheb Dadarao Danve Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution
21 Vishnu Deo Sai Mines
Steel
Labour and Employment
22. Sudarshan Bhagat Social Justice and Empowerment

 

Courtesy: PIB

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Level-playing Field for Government Banks?
PJ Nayak Committee has some excellent ideas
 
Bank unions are furious at the suggestion that the government should reduce its holding in nationalised banks to below 50%. The All India Bank Employees Union (AIBEA) has threatened a series of protests and announced a strike against the proposal. But some of the key recommendations of the committee on bank governance, headed by former Axis Bank chairman PJ Nayak, seem the only way forward to ensure the long-term revival of nationalised banks. A core recommendation is to unshackle banks from government control and finance ministry’s interference, by reducing government holding to under 50% and bringing banks under the sole regulation of RBI. 
 
It suggests that when government shareholding is brought below 50%, the rest should be transferred to a bank investment company (BIC). BIC will act like a passive fund whose focus would be to ensure good returns on its investment. The committee recommends the creation of a category of authorised bank investors (ABIs) who can invest in banks without prior approval. Interestingly, GV Ramakrishna first mooted a BIC-like concept for public sector undertakings (PSUs) when he headed the Disinvestment Commission. Unfortunately, it was not implemented. Instead, PSUs were sold as going concerns allowing private acquirers to reap mammoth benefits from their real estate assets. BIC is a sound concept, provided the institution is allowed to function independently, like it does in Singapore. Otherwise, it will turn into another SUTI (Specified Undertaking of the UTI, a holding company formed when the mammoth Unit Trust of India was split) which is not allowed to make any independent decisions. 
 
Other key recommendations flow from the need to create a level playing field between government and private banks. It recommends that these ‘privatised’ PSU banks be removed from dual regulation of the finance ministry and RBI and brought solely under RBI. They must also be subject to the same listing and disclosure norms. 
 
The revamp would also include truly independent directors being appointed on bank boards, rather than government appointees; strict adherence to the Securities and Exchange Board of India’s (SEBI’s) listing norms. The committee has also sought a rationalisation of bank classification; especially ‘old private banks’ and wholly-owned government banks such as the Bharatiya Mahila Bank.

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COMMENTS

Nagesh Kini

3 years ago

The Bank Unions, instead of resisting changes, should insist that the GOI divest in favour of small and retail investors and former and present bank employees and not large institutional entities.Dr. Nayak has in deed made many sensible do-able recommendations.

Simple Indian

3 years ago

While the Nayak Committee recommendations are welcome, and if implemented, would help make PSU Banks profitable and efficient, I am hardly surprised by the Unions' response. It reminds me of the way Bank Unions would 'terrorize' customers by going on a strike in the pre-ATM era in 1980s. It's high time the PSU Banks are made accountable and profitable. In this era, where jobs are scarce for the educated youth, PSU Banks retain huge workforce of pre-IT era, who can just about work on computers for basic tasks. One visit to any PSU Bank branch will show just how lethargic the older staff is, particularly when it comes to using IT facilities, which is in fact meant to improve their productivity. PSU Banks offer its staff the best of both worlds - a laid-back work culture as in a Govt office, but with job security, but enjoy salaries & perks comparable with private Bank staff, without the work pressures seen in private Banks. India must move away from the socialist policies and make best use of its institutions and human resources to have efficiency as paramount reason for their existence. But then, India is not exactly known for meritocracy, is it ?

Ashok Kumar Bhargava

3 years ago

New Government has come let us see whether Ache din aney wale hain? for banks also

Gopalakrishnan T V

3 years ago

The need to run the PSBs on professional lines is long overdue as the Government cannot any more afford to carry on the burden of running such rotten institutions with tax payers’ money and with other attendant implications on its finances and the economy. The way these banks are run allowing borrowers to loot perennially the depositors' and tax payers money with the solid backing of the Government cannot go on for ever and time has come to have a relook and revamp the banks to make them really the powerful engines of growth of the economy. The model suggested in the report on par with Temasek in Singapore or the UK Governments UK Financial Investments Ltd can be easily replicated and what the economy wants is that banks should play their role of mobilisation of deposits and the deployment of funds for equitable growth of the economy effectively under proper regulation and supervision by a professional body without any interference from the Government what so ever and accountable to the parliament. The Government and the economy should be the beneficiaries out of such banks and not the other way round. No doubt, the unions will have to be taken into confidence and their interest cannot be jettisoned. The need to have professional Boards,effective constructive regulation and supervision is paramount and hope the new Government would take this report seriously and implement the recommendations in letter and spirit. More than any one,the Government would be the major beneficiary is also the moot point.

REPLY

amit kumar

In Reply to Gopalakrishnan T V 2 years ago

for your information psu are not using tax payer money.but generate their own income.today most of psu bank and psu are profitable ,and earning income for goverment.brother you seems to be very unaware of real facts.

S.S.A.Zaidi

3 years ago

Nayak Committe recommendations are worth implementing.Unless the Govt fetters are removed these Public sector banks will not be able to come out of the morass they are in.I am sure Mr Rajan as RBI governor will continue and Mr Arun Jaitely our FM who is very articulate will ensure that Nayak committee recommendations are adopted
Zaidi

ramchandran vishwanathan

3 years ago

Hope Mr.Modi & Jaitely are listening
Its high time Nationalised banks give a run for their money to the private banks.They are much more capable.

Social Media, Not by Remote Control
PMOIndia twitter handle goof up shows cannot do social media by Remote Control
 
A social media presence, especially on twitter, is considered essential for political success these days. It started with Barak Obama making history in America and has only been strengthened by Narendra Modi’s roaring success. Unsurprisingly, the Congress Party simply does not get it. The prime minister’s office (PMO) did the fashionable thing by hiring a broadcast journalist, Pankaj Pachauri, as a ‘communications advisor’, who promptly set up a twitter account @PMOIndia, a facebook page and a YouTube account.
 
Now, a prime minister (PM), who does not tweet or communicate personally, must ensure that his account remains formal and maintains the decorum expected from the head of state. But the PM’s communication advisor quickly proceeded to operate the twitter account like it was a personal one. 
 
He used it to plug new entrants to social media, planning commission hangouts and other conferences. Social media is abuzz with tweets that he also used the direct messaging (DM) facility to send private messages to friendly media, while blocking hostile ones. When the Congress Party crashed out of power, came the embarrassing realisation that the account will have to be handed over to someone who was seen as a public enemy. Worse, passing on the account and password with 1.4 million followers, would entail access to all messages including DMs. 
 
An unorthodox solution was found by abandoning the @PMOIndia twitter handle and renaming it as @PMOIndiaArchive to store the records under the provisions of the Right to Information Act. This has triggered a twitter-war with the BJP social media cell claiming it was a ‘national digital asset’ that should have been formally handed over to the new prime minister. 
 
As luck would have it, a 19-year-old, called Qaiser Ali, discovered that the @PMOIndia handle was suddenly available and secured it for himself. Half an hour later, Twitter India apparently reclaimed the account and reverted Qaisar to his old handle without explanation. The BJP claims that Twitter India acted at its instance to take charge of the account. 
 
While gaffes are natural while using a new medium, the acrimony could have been avoided if the outgoing government had chosen to act with grace and civility. However, the bigger lesson here, for politicians, corporate leaders or even television anchors, is that social media works only if you want to engage with people personally. 
 
It is perhaps telling that Rahul or Sonia Gandhi and the core team that handled their election campaign have no social media presence. They clearly don’t believe in listening or interacting. Almost all other politicians, of any significance, are now on twitter or facebook; most use it as a broadcast tool which is handled by a ‘social media team’. They pretend to communicate but are unlikely to be listening to feedback or interacting with people. Fortunately, the medium is such that it exposes fake sociability very quickly.  

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