Beyond Money
Help Them to Live in Dignity
ALERT-India reaches out to persons affected by leprosy even in cases where complete cure is difficult 
 
Leprosy is a disease riddled with misconceptions and shrouded in myths. Patients do not realise that their pale, numb, non-itching patch of skin is, in fact, the first sign of leprosy. In 1975, Antony Samy, as a young aspirant studying social sciences at Mumbai, had witnessed the dismal condition of persons affected by leprosy living in ghettos in one of the suburbs of Mumbai. Soon after acquiring his Master’s degree in social welfare administration, he brought together a few like-minded people and founded ALERT-India to detect, treat and cure this disease well before those affected suffer social exclusion. The physical, social and economic suffering that leprosy patients are subjected to motivated Mr Samy (CEO, ALERT-India) to establish the NGO in 1978. 
 
ALERT-India (Association for Leprosy Education, Rehabilitation and Treatment-India), as a voluntary charitable organisation, started its work more than three decades ago with a vision to eradicate leprosy from our country. The NGO’s main battle is against superstition and the fear of ostracism that makes patients shy away from acknowledging ailments such as leprosy.
Consequently, this age-old disease still lingers in our cities and villages largely due to ignorance and social myths that add to the fear and stigma that surround leprosy.
 
Over the years, ALERT-India has evolved from a single clinic operating in Vikhroli (a Mumbai suburb) to carrying out leprosy control activities through 125 leprosy referral centres (LRCs) in 14 districts of Maharashtra and one in Chhattisgarh. Each district is divided into blocks and several foundations and corporates, such as State Bank of India, HT Parekh Foundation and All Cargo Logistics, have chosen to support the leprosy control activities of ALERT-India in selected blocks.
 
ALERT-India has treated and cured over 48,000 patients of leprosy in the past 36 years. Rehabilitation is provided in several ways—physiotherapy, specialised micro-cellular rubber (MCR) footwear, counselling about self-care as well as educational grants for leprosy-affected or their children. Patients are given treatment, counselling and physiotherapy services free of cost in special clinics where, besides medication, services like skin smear diagnostic facilities are also provided.
 
Advocacy of patient’s rights is also an important and integral part of ALERT-India’s work. Several ex-patients or their family members are employed by the organisation. ALERT-India also helps patients to avail government welfare schemes for which they are eligible.
 
Awareness-building, especially for school and college going children, through audio-visual talks at educational institutions, exhibitions, album talks and community-based education, forms a large part of ALERT-India’s activities. CMEs (continuing medical education) as refresher courses on leprosy for doctors are also undertaken. It is important that treatment starts at the earliest stage to prevent deformities. Free medical therapy is provided through the latest MDT (multi drug therapy) regimen which renders the patient non-infectious with the first dose itself. 
 
ALERT-India partners with more than 60 NGOs and CBOs (community-based organisations) from the health and development sector as well as with local self-government (municipal corporations & councils) and the health departments of Maharashtra and the Central government in the fight against leprosy.
 
Donations to ALERT-India are exempt under Section 80-G of Income-Tax Act.
 
ALERT-India
Association for Leprosy Education, Rehabilitation & Treatment-India
B-9, Mira Mansion, Sion (West), Mumbai - 400 022, India
Telephone  0091 22 2403 3081-2, 2407 2558, Fax: 24017652

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COMMENTS

manoharlalsharma

2 years ago

Brief ; Even after matter of membership is settled by the bench of Mumbai HC with the PIL-474/1996 and then again rejected from HC/ WP-5771/1997 with a remark ‘as it is an abuse of the process of law’ and finally Supreme court (SLP (civil) No 10922/98) kept HC order intact but society MC is still paddling the same argument keeping concealed information from the high court.
Since last 16 years we 315 members battling for membership of ’Shree Ganesh Co-operative Housing Society’ would like to bring your notice a serious violation of ‘FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS’ and continue to contempt of LAW & JUDICIARY by the MC.

Book Review of 'Trend Trading set-ups'
High probability trades based on price and volume trends
 
There are many ways to trade in the markets. The most popular one is trend-following. Prices in all markets—commodities, currencies and stocks —tend to trend, from a few days to a few weeks. Trend-followers try to identify a rising or a falling trend and ride it. This sounds simple. Indeed, the chart of any traded financial instrument will show trends. However, what you see in the chart is the past. Trends can end abruptly. Sometimes, they end and then resume immediately. It is very difficult to get into and out of trends because at the time you take a position in the direction of a trend, you do not know the duration the trend will last. 
 
Trends are followed by experts and novice traders alike. The greenhorn trader uses it because it’s easy. The expert trader uses it because, after many years, realisation dawns that it is futile to try to anticipate anything in the market. It’s prudent to just trade in the direction of the established trend. Traders, like Ed Seykota, Richard Dennis and Paul Tudor Jones, have made millions by following trends. But this requires a lot of study, deep belief, patience and discipline. Few have it.
 
There are many books on trend-following (many of which have been reviewed in Moneylife). But LA Little, a trader and a columnist with websites like marketwatch.com and street.com, has a different approach. He wants to zero in on high probability set-ups under any market condition based on past data of only price and volume. 
 
The book is divided into seven chapters. The first three in Part 1 give you the fundamental concepts of Little’s system. Chapter one discusses how to identify trends and how long they can last. What kind of expectancy can one have of trends, especially since many trends would fail? Little shares a lot of interesting details. For instance,  intermediate bullish trends can last 25 bars. 
 
The next chapter describes key trading concepts of anchor bars and zones that define where prices can turn. Chapter three explains the influence of broader market trends on individual stocks; after all, most stocks tend to move in the direction of the general market and the specific sector. This helps in deciding the trend of a stock within the overall trend of the sector it belongs to. These three chapters are drawn from Little’s previous work Trend Qualification and Trading which I had reviewed in Moneylife (Issue 22 September 2011). 
 
Part 2 starts with formulating a workable trading plan, which includes determining trend direction and strength, the time frame to trade in (intraday, daily or weekly), timing entry and exit and also trading size, scaling in and out of trades and estimating the risk-reward ratio. Chapter 5 discusses trade set-ups. Little argues that there are really two types of trade set-ups: breakout and retraces. This is not an original idea, in price analysis. All momentum-based traders look for breakouts. And all those who look for reversions, wait for retraces. But Little’s view is radical. He believes that all other set-ups, all the countless variations, patterns and indicators, are extensions of these two basic trade types, basically. Chapter 6 discusses trading in sideways market while the last chapter explains trading of breakouts and retrace. 
 
This book is important because Little uses only price, volume and time to create trading signals supported by his analysis of past data. The focus is on staying close to measuring demand and supply—the two factors that are the main determinants of price. Simplicity is the basis of Little’s approach. He frees the trader of numerous rules, patterns and the many variations which  fill up popular books on technical analysis, leaving them confused. The book is a worthy addition to the serious literature on studying price patterns.

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Nifty, Sensex, Bank Nifty show first signs of reversal – Wednesday closing report

A close below 8,890 in Nifty and below 19,600 in Bank Nifty will confirm the downtrend

 

The market was supercharged on Wednesday before trading started on the news of unanticipated rate cut by Reserve Bank of India (RBI). The indices opened sharply higher at their lifetime highs and moved higher. However, selling started immediately. The indices moved gradually lower. After around 2.20pm, the benchmarks made a sharp plunge into the red zone. They hit the day’s low and closed near to it, thus abruptly breaking the trend of past four days of upmove.
 
S&P BSE Sensex opened at 29,937 while NSE’s CNX Nifty opened at 9,109. Sensex hit its high at 30,025 while Nifty hit the high of 9,119. Sensex moved lower to the level of 29,289 and closed at 29,381 (down 213 points or 0.72%). Nifty hit a low of 8,894 and closed at 8,923 (down 74 points or 0.82%). Nifty managed closed just 12 points above the support of 8,910 we mentioned in Tuesday’s closing report. Bank Nifty opened at 20,542, which was the day’s high it moved to the low of 19,555 and closed at 19,644 (down 317 points or 1.59%). NSE recorded huge volume of 125.91 crore shares. India VIX fell 1.90% to close at 15.1975.
 
The Reserve Bank, in a surprise move, reduced repo rate under the liquidity adjustment facility by 25 basis points to 7.5% from 7.75% with immediate effect. Cash reserve ratio (CRR) of scheduled banks remained unchanged at 4% of net demand and time liabilities.
 
The RBI said that the need to act outside the policy review cycle is prompted by two factors. First, while the next bi-monthly policy statement will be issued on 7 April 2015 the still weak state of certain sectors of the economy, as well as the global trend towards easing, suggests that any policy action should be anticipatory once sufficient data support the policy stance, the central bank said. Second, with the release of the agreement on the monetary policy framework, it is appropriate for the Reserve Bank to offer guidance on how it will implement the mandate, the central bank said.
 
The HSBC Services Purchasing Managers' Index (PMI) rose to 53.9 in February from 52.4, its highest since June 2014. Strong new business growth was the primary factor cited by survey respondents for the increase in activity.
 
Telecom companies are likely to commit $13 billion or over Rs80,000 crore in the ongoing spectrum auction with Idea Cellular being the "most exposed" in the race as a bulk of its licences are getting expired soon, global ratings agency Fitch has said.
 
Coming back to stock markets, Alstom T&D (9.06%) was the top gainer in ‘A’ group on the BSE. The stock hit its 52-week high today.
 
Bhushan Steel (8.00%) was the top loser in ‘A’ group on the BSE. STCI Finance has invoked 176,000 shares in Bhushan Steel that were pledged by Bhushan Infrastructure to overcome losses from the fall in stock prices in the last one week.
 
Sun Pharma (6.62%) was the top gainer in the Sensex 30 pack. It hit its 52-week high today. Sun Pharma entered into an agreement whereby it will acquire GSK’s opiates business in Australia. Currently, GSK opiates business, including related manufacturing sites in Latrobe (in the State of Tasmania) and Port Fairy (in the State of Victoria) and its portfolio of opiates products along with inventory, will be transferred to a subsidiary of
Sun Pharma. GSK’s product portfolio consists of poppy-derived opiate raw materials, used primarily in the making of analgesics to treat moderate to severe pain. Sesa Sterlite (4.11%) was the top loser in the Sensex 30 stock.
 
On Tuesday, US indices closed in the red.
 
Except for Shanghai Composite (0.51%), KLSE Composite (0.24%) and Taiwan Weighted (0.17%) all the other Asian indices closed in the red. SET Composite index of Thailand was the top loser. 
 
China's monthly HSBC purchasing managers' index for the services sector was 52, a slight increase from the six-month low of 51.8 in January. 
 
Japan's Markit's monthly index of the services sector fell from 51.3 in January to 48.5, the lowest reading since April. Australia's GDP grew at an annual pace of 2.5%, matching estimates, data showed today.
 
European indices were trading in the red. US Futures too were trading lower. Monthly monetary policy review from the European Central Bank is scheduled tomorrow.
 

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