Citizens' Issues
Hated India, Indians since 1971: David Headley
Pakistani-American LeT terrorist-turned-approver David Coleman Headley said here on Friday that he nursed a hatred towards India and Indians since December 1971 when his school was bombed by Indian fighter planes during India-Pakistan war which saw the creation of Bangladesh.
 
"I have this hatred... towards Indian since December 7, 1971... When Indian planes had bombed my school... The school was destroyed and many people who worked there had died," Headley claimed on the third day of his ongoing cross-examination before Special Judge G. A. Sanap on Friday.
 
He was replying to the questions posed by lawyer Abdul Wahab Khan, the defence cousel for Zabiuddin Ansari alias Abu Jundal, one of the key plotters of the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks.
 
Headley was referring to the bombing of his school during the India-Pakistan war which saw the dismemberment of East Pakistan that became Bangladesh.
 
The childhood incident when he was barely 10 years old left such an imprint on his tender mind that Headley decided to join the Lashkar-e-Taiba later to avenge the bombing of his school. 
 
He admitted that it was one of the reasons why he joined the LeT years later.
 
In another disclosure, Headley, 56, said he made attempt to organise a fund-raising programme for the Shiv Sena party and even invite the party's founder-patriarch, the late Bal Thackery to the US, but he had no plans to attack him there.
 
Incidentally, on February 12 he had revealed a plot to kill the late Bal Thackeray and on March 24 (Thursday) he spoke of an attack made on him (Thackeray) with the attacker caught but managed to escape from police custody.
 
Headley said that he was in touch with the then Shiv Sena Public Relations Officer Rajaram Rege whom he had earlier befriended in connection with the planned trip for the late Thackeray.
 
Though Headley never met the late Thackeray, he was open to inviting some other Sena leader after Rege informed that the senior Thackeray was old and unwell, he said.
 
Headley is being cross-examined by Khan via video-conferencing from an unknown location in the US where he is currently undergoing a 35-year jail sentence for the 26/11 and Denmark terror strikes.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Vijay Mallya quits as chairman Sanofi India

Mallya conveyed his decision not to seek re-election as a director at the company's ensuing Annual General Meeting, said the Sanofi statement 

 

Beleaguered business tycoon Vijay Mallya has decided to step down as the chairman of pharma major Sanofi India, nearly 33 years after he assumed the post, the company said in a statement here.
 
Mallya conveyed his decision not to seek re-election as a director at the company's ensuing Annual General Meeting, said the Sanofi statement issued late Wednesday.
 
Mallya had first joined in December 1973 as director of Sanofi India Ltd (SIL), then known as Hoechst Pharmaceuticals Ltd. He functioned as the board chairman since December 1983.
 
"I have been privileged to preside over the board of this company, which started as Hoechst Pharmaceuticals Ltd. and to have participated in its phenomenal growth and prosperity over such an extraordinarily long period of time," Mallya said in a farewell statement.
 
"It was gratifying that the company continued serving needy patients in India with world-class medication while ensuring consistent returns to all stakeholders."
 
Mallya, who is believed to be hiding in the United Kingdom, is wanted by the Enforcement Directorate (ED) in connection with a money-laundering case. The former liquor baron -- known as 'king of good times' -- has denied that he was "absconding", saying as an "international businessman" he is currently abroad on a business trip and was expected to return by March-end.
 
SIL Managing Director Shailesh Ayyangar said under Mallya's leadership, in the past 10 years, the company's sales grew from Rs.800 crore to Rs.2,000 crore, share price shot up from Rs.1,655 to Rs.4,358, market cap has almost tripled and the employee strength more than doubled from 1,500 to 3,700.
 
The SIL announced plans to induct Aditya Narayan and Usha Thorat as two new independent directors for five years from April 30, 2016. Subject to fulfilling all requirements, Aditya Narayan, 64, is slated to succeed Mallya as SIL Chairman.
 
SIL is listed on both BSE and NSE. Its parent Sanofi has 60.4 percent equity stake in SIL whose portfolio includes pharmaceuticals and consumer healthcare products.
 
In pharma, SIL has a strong presence in diabetes, being the only company with a balanced oral and insulin portfolio.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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Blame-game begins after Brussels carnage

The French alleged that the Belgians knew of the radicalisation of a significant part of Muslim-dominated areas in Brussels but turned a blind eye to radical Islam taking root in their capital city

 

An internecine battle between various European Union nations, especially between France and Belgium, which had been brewing since the November 13, 2015 attacks in Paris, flared up in public again after the carnage in Brussels on Tuesday.
 
Barely had the news of terror attack in Paris spread that several French officials, including senior ministers in the government, blamed Belgium for "hosting" the alleged terrorists who were suspected to be behind the Paris attacks. The French alleged that the Belgians knew of the radicalisation of a significant part of Muslim-dominated areas in Brussels but turned a blind eye to radical Islam taking root in their capital city.
 
And on Tuesday, French Economy Minister Michel Sapin told a French news channel that the Belgian government had, "intentionally or unintentionally, as they may have hoped for better integration of the Muslim minorities with the mainstream society, let communalism and radical Islam prosper in Maelbeek" (a Brussels locality that has been under the lens since the Paris attacks). 
 
“The Belgian government clearly has failed in doing the needful and perhaps it is a kind of naivety with which they handled the entire situation,” Sapin went on to tell the television channel.
 
Some French media also went on the offensive against Belgium, saying that the authorities had not taken the necessary steps to prevent the attacks, even though Brussels has effectively been in a lock-down kind of situation since the November 13 attacks.
 
On Tuesday evening, a French radio station host was told by a French security expert that the Belgian police had come to know of the hiding place of Salah Abdesalam, the alleged mastermind of the Paris attacks, a couple of days before his arrest last week.
 
“However, the Belgian police refused to raid the apartment in the middle of the night, when the information was shared with them by the French police, saying that the Belgian law did not allow police to make arrests from homes before day-break. How seriously can you battle the mounting security challenges with such an attitude," the expert wondered.
 
Luckily for Belgium, several other French officials, including Prime Minister Manuel Valls himself, interjected and criticised Sapin for his comments. “At this critical moment, when we are faced with an unprecedented challenge, Europe can not afford to be divided or even seen as divided," Valls told a French radio show Wednesday morning, adding that if Belgium had difficult quarters with challenges, so did France.
 
“I am not here to give lessons to our Belgian friends. We also have parts of our cities under the influence of drug traffickers and extremists," Valls added. “All over Europe, and in France, we had turned a blind eye to increasing extremist ideas and salafists," the French prime minister admitted. 
 
Sapin was also taken to task by his other party colleagues and other French politicians who said that France was almost in the same position as Belgium and had nothing to preach to anyone.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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