HAL wins Boeing's 2009 ‘Supplier of the Year’ award

The local player has won the ‘Alliance Award’ in recognition of its unique capabilities and services

Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL), India's premier aerospace company, has been named one of the winners of Boeing’s 2009 ‘Supplier of the Year Award’, reports PTI.

Bengaluru-based HAL has been awarded the newly-constituted ‘Alliance Award’ in recognition of its “unique capabilities and services that are instrumental to a new Boeing product.”

Boeing, the world's leading aerospace company, named 14 companies as winners of the award.

The winners, chosen from among the company's more than 12,000 active suppliers worldwide, were judged on quality, delivery performance, cost, environmental initiatives, customer service and technical expertise. The winners are located in Germany, Japan and the US.

Before being chosen as the ‘Supplier of the Year’, each company was named as one of the 486 recipients of a ‘Boeing Performance Excellence Award’.

“Boeing and our suppliers are more interconnected now than ever before, combining our talents and capabilities to create the most innovative products and services for our customers and the aerospace industry worldwide,” Boeing’s enterprise leader of supplier management Ray Conner said in a statement.

Japan’s Bridgestone Corp was awarded for electro, hydraulic and mechanical standards, Ohio's GE Commercial Engine Operations won for propulsion, while another winner is Germany's Deharde-Maschinenbau H Hoffmann GmbH. Among the winners, three companies are based in Illinois.
 

User

COMMENTS

Shadi Katyal

7 years ago

Nice to hear such news but why does it not tell what HAL supplies to Boeing? We would like to know

Inflation inches up to 9.9% in March

However, food inflation for the week ended 3rd April slid to 17.22% from 17.70% in the previous week

Wholesale price-based inflation remained below the psychological two-digit score, inching up marginally to 9.9% in March from 9.89% in the previous month.

The hike was on account of rising prices of sugar and pulses.

Food inflation for the week ended 3rd April, however, slid to 17.22% from 17.70% in the previous week.

The fall was mainly on account of cheaper potato and onions that fell by 23.71% and 2.5% respectively on an annual basis.

According to the monthly inflation data, sugar prices rose by 48.75% in March year-on-year while pulses turned costlier by 31.40%.
 

User

COMMENTS

ramesh b

7 years ago

long live inflation! our tolerance has increased a lot! earlier lesser inflation was a horrible shock.hmv record sings..inflation/prices will go down in future...! -constantly. the only matter which matters is Growth...(of ?)

Should Insurance Ads Be Banned from TV?

They pull at your heart strings to make you open your purse strings

I am cynical by temperament. My first instinct is to be suspicious about things, events, people and, more importantly, promises. And thank god for that. Perhaps, this negative mindset has helped me hold on to my hard-earned savings. The gullible and the so-called ‘positive thinkers’ have had terrible experiences.

Especially because they leaped into insurance plans before they looked, falling prey to misleading advertisements, not bothering to ask important questions.

 Which brings me to the main issue: Shouldn’t it be mandatory for insurance ads on television to clearly spell out the exact deals they offer? Along with the exact rates of return, the risk factors, the hidden downsides, etc? Sure, they can make all sorts of promises of a dazzling future, but they must also state the not-so-good news.

Well, that doesn’t happen. Nor does the statutory risk warning bell go off. So all we are left with are lofty claims and delirious promises. Future Generali promises you will have enough dosh to buy quartz watches for 600 behenjis. Max New York Life promises a sensational future for your kids, even if they grow up to be ‘idiots’. HDFC Standard Life asks you to ‘Sar utha ke jiyo’. And the loser in their ad is a sad bald man and the smartie, a cool dude. (I protest! Baldies are known to be prosperous gents!). Canara HSBC Life Insurance wants to insure your emotions (I kid you not). ICICI Lombard promises blanket protection for your family. Quite literally. SBI Life Insurance promises you will drive a lambi gaadi at the age of 60, while singing classic Hindi songs for your geriatric wife. TATA AIG is determined to turn your kids into superstars. Kotak Life Insurance goes a step further. Your kids could become astronauts, doctors, cricketers or rock stars. LIC’s Jeevan Saral promises ice golas for your kids (so maybe they are being honest, hehe). And the list goes on.

Now here’s what ad agencies and their clients will tell you in their defence, and I quite empathise with their predicament. In a 30-second (and often less) TV commercial, it just isn’t possible to load mathematics. Not just that. The non-captive and entertainment-led medium does not allow for cold facts and figures.

Yup, this is true, to an extent. People will smash their LCD sets if, between the overs during an IPL match, bar and pie-charts are shoved down their throats. Fair enough. So the marketers have no choice but to use the medium to attract viewers, expecting them to do their homework later, by reading prospectuses and grilling the insurance company staffers (the ICICI dudes will patiently chat with you till the wee hours of the morning). But, as we know, that’s usually not how it plays out. People get carried away with celestial promises, blindly invest their funds and get heavy shocks later (just as in the Havells fans commercial).    

Maybe the time has come for the regulators to take a hard decision. Either the insurance companies find a way to spell out the good and gory details in their TV ads, or these ads need to be banned from television. And the marketers can opt for captive media such as the press and the Internet to sell their wares. With full details. Sounds harsh? It is. But it’s a lot better than zillions of citizens blowing up their savings and dreams.

 The problem of misleading ads is as old as the hills. All sorts of brands have been pulled up in the past for misleading consumers. From health drinks to detergent powders to toothpastes to automobiles. To some degree, people can absorb those shocks. But a misleading insurance ad can cause serious damage. To one’s livelihood. And to those who the insurer leaves behind. To not rest in peace. 

User

COMMENTS

Amalaraj Marian

7 years ago

It is the job of the regulator and the advertisement council to screen the likely script and approve. I have a detest for the insurance advertisements as they concentrate on demeaning some other good products. The advertisement that stood out on this issue was the add which was made for Bajaj Instashield which gurantteed 170% returns in 10 years!!!!!!!! yeaks it tried to demean a Fixed Deposit without realising that it was exposing the soft underbelly. This advrt had atleast 10 points which could disqulify from airing the clip.
besides this LIC is been know to have distributed more choclates than what it promised for every add has something the subject has already eaten and the left over (if ever) are for the family (what i understand from the advertisement) instead of keeping the entire pie for the family for they are the ones who need protection and that is what insurances should be bought for.

Shobha Mathur

7 years ago

Spot on. And you never know when another regulator might decide to join the fray and spoil the party totally.

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)