Companies & Sectors
Gupta's Liberty House to bid for Tata Steel UK on Tuesday
London : Metals major Liberty House, founded by India-born industrialist Sanjiv Kumar Gupta, confirmed on Monday that it will formally bid for the UK assets of Tata Steel, which are on the block after Tatas suffered nearly $3 billion in losses thus far.
 
“We can confirm that Liberty will submit a letter of intent to Tata Steel on Tuesday and has put in place a strong internal transaction team and panel of leading external advisers to take the bid forward,” a Liberty House spokesman was quoted as saying in the Financial Times.
 
Liberty Group has revenues approaching $5 billion, covering steel, raw materials and non-ferrous metals, while employing more than 2,000 people globally. It also produces about five million tonnes per annum of steel and steel products.
 
In March, Tata Steel UK announced an accord to sell its Clydebridge and Dalzell steel units in Scotland. The deal involved the sale of the two plants to the government of Scotland, which was to, in turn, sell them to Liberty House.
 
Earlier last month when British Business Secretary Sajid Javid flew down to Mumbai to meet with Tata Steel brass, Gupta was among the key people whom he met here to hold consultations on the future of the group's steel business in the UK, notably to prevent thousands of job losses.
 
The European arm of Tata Steel said in mid-April that it was in talks with as many as 190 suitors for its UK units and that KPMG would be its principal advisor in this regard, with Standard Chartered Bank as an additional one.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Supreme Court to consider NEET exemption applications on Tuesday
New Delhi : The Supreme Court will hear on Tuesday a batch of applications seeking that NEET for admissions to undergraduate medical courses may not be thrust on the states and they may be allowed to conduct their own entrance examinations.
 
An apex court bench headed by the Chief Justice P.S. Thakur on Monday said the hearing by the special bench headed by Justice Anil R. Dave will take place on Tuesday at 2 p.m. after a battery of senior lawyers, including Gopal Subramaniam appearing for Jammu and Kashmir, and K. K. Venugopal appearing for Association of Private Medical Colleges of Karnataka mentioned the matter.
 
Various states, including the association of private medical colleges are aggrieved by the top court’s Friday order reiterating that admission to undergraduate medical courses will be only through National Eligibility Entrance Test (NEET) to be conducted by the Central Board of School Education (CBSE).
 
The first phase of NEET was conducted on Sunday. The second phase will be held on July 24.
 
In the meantime, a constitution bench of the top court on Monday upheld the Madhya Pradesh law providing for common entrance test for admission to medical courses both in government and private medical colleges.
 
The bench, after a majority judgement, said the admissions to the seats not filled under the management quota will be done by the state governments.
 
The constitution bench also set up a three member committee that will oversee the counselling and admission under the aegis of Medical Council of India till a law is enacted by parliament empowering medical regulatory body to conduct counselling and admissions. 
 
Former Chief Justice of India, Justice R. M. Lodha, former Comptroller and Auditor General Vinod Rai and eminent doctor Shiv Sarin are the panel members.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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How To Create Strong Passwords
No password is 100% secure. But you can make one that is really hard to crack
 
With technological advances, almost everything that you use is susceptible to unauthorised usage which highlights the importance of having robust passwords and personal identification number (PIN) for everything, including network accounts, online services, websites, ATMs, credit cards and even the Wi-Fi connection. However, being human (and lazy), we find it difficult to create and remember robust passwords and end up compromising our security. Many people are reluctant even to create ‘difficult’ passwords. However, creating a good, robust and hard-to-crack password is not rocket science and can be done easily. To create a good, robust password, you must:
  1. Choose a password that doesn’t contain a readable word. 
  2. Mix upper- and lower-case letters. Use a number or symbol in the middle of the word, not at the end. Don’t just use ‘1’ or ‘!’, and don’t use symbols as replacements for letters, such as ‘@’ for a lowercase ‘a’. It’s passé.
 
Simple, isn’t it? However, some may still find it difficult to create good passwords. So, here are some simple and useful tips to create robust passwords.  
Start with an original, but memorable, phrase—for example, ‘Moneylife says know what’s coming’ or ‘My first Maruti was a real lemon so I bought a Toyota’. The phrase can be anything; but make sure it’s something you can remember easily without writing it down. The best phrase to use is one in your mother tongue. This will help you avoid using a guessable English dictionary word.
 
Now, convert the simple, memorable phrase into an acronym and use some numbers, symbols and upper-lower case letters. The above-mentioned phrases can be converted into ‘MLskwc’ or ‘[email protected]’ and ‘M1stMwarlsIbaT!’.
 
Using the same method, you can also create site-specific passwords; for example, ‘It’s 45 degrees in May, so I use Gmail’ can become ‘i50dgiMsIuG’ (50 is not the real temperature; it’s for the month number multiplied by 10). Based on the phrase, you can change your password almost every month; for January, it becomes ‘i10dgiJsIuG’ and for September, it’s ‘i90dgiSsIuG’ and so on.
 
For general sites, which do not affect you personally or financially, use simple phrases to create passwords. 
Reserve your strongest and most distinct passwords for critical services like your bank account, your computer and your personal e-mail.
Also, try to create a password that contains minimum eight characters. For finance-related things, make sure it is at least 13 characters long. Remember, longer passwords make stronger passwords. There are about 645 trillion combinations for eight character passwords. For nine and 10 characters, the combinations go to 45 quadrillion (a thousand trillion) and 3 quintillion (a billion, billion) combinations. This, in short, means that the cracker or hacker will have to spend much more time to crack your password. 
 
For example, an eight character password like the one ‘abcd1234’ can be cracked instantly, while ‘Abcd123$’ takes around nine hours to crack. The password ‘Abcdefgh123456’ will take 10 million years to crack. Adding a simple wild character like ‘&’ in this password will take almost 16 billion years to crack, says HowSecureIsMyPassword.net. (Please refrain from entering your real password on this or any other irrelevant site) The PINs for ATM or debit and credit card can also be created using the method given above. However, since it contains just four numbers, you need to take the help of the keyboard of an old mobile which has numbers and letters (usually three-four) inscribed. Using this method, and the root phrase ‘Moneylife says know what’s coming’ you new PIN would be 6592 (using the digits corresponding to the first letter of each word—6 for ‘Moneylife’, 5 for ‘know’, 9 for ‘what’s’ and 2 for ‘coming’). Do not use your or the name of your family member, mobile number, date of birth, or PAN number, in the password. Go and find a memorable phrase, especially in your mother tongue, and create a robust password of 13 characters.

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COMMENTS

Shanil Mohan

10 months ago

Great article. Some very useful ideas here.

Vishal Modi

10 months ago

Thank you Yogesh. As usual, useful tips just when we badly require it! :)

Anand Vaidya

10 months ago

I use an application called makepasswd on my linux desktop/server to generate hard to guess, fairly random passwords

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