Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Google celebrates International Women's Day with doodle
New Delhi : Global internet search giant Google on Tuesday marked the International Women's Day with one of its special doodles featuring real women rather than animated characters.
 
The International Women's Day, celebrated on March 8, is a global event aimed at inspiring women and celebrating their achievements. 
 
Google posted a short video on its home page in which some women are seen sharing their aspirations, completing the sentence "One day I will..."
 
Liat Ben-Rafael, who co-created the doodle, told Mirror Online it was important to her to feature real women in the video, rather than animated characters, which usually appear in Google doodles.
 
"International Women's Day is a celebration of the women who are here today working towards a better future, and in that sense it was important for me to make sure that we celebrate the real women," she said.
 
"It's the unsung heroes, this is what we're celebrating, so not showing the real women behind this would be a big loss."
 
Google users can watch the video on by clicking on the play button on the Google home page in their browsers on March 8.
 
Users are also encouraged to share their own aspirations on social media, using the hashtag #OneDayIWill. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Internet should not become the monopoly of few: Prasad
New Delhi : India firmly holds that internet is one of the finest creations of human mind and it should not become the monopoly of few, said Communications Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said Monday.
 
"We instinctively value internet to be open, plural and inclusive and access should be without discrimination," said Prasad at the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) 55 summit at the summit in Morocco's Marrakech, according to an official statement here.
 
A month ago, Indian telecom watchdog Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) ruled against Facebook's Free Basics programme upholding net neutrality and leaving a level playing field for all players.
 
About Digital India, Skill India, Make in India, Start up India and Smart Cities, Prasad said the transformative programmes are aimed at creating a knowledge economy and empowered India.
 
He said the programmes have a defined purpose to bridge the digital divide, unleash the digital literacy massively and create a profound platform of financial and social inclusion.
 
"All these are being done by leveraging the power of Internet. Our priority is to ensure banking the unbanked, funding the unfunded, securing the unsecured and pensioning the unpensioned," he said, adding that India currently has one billion mobile phone connections, 400 million internet subscribers -" who grew from 300 million to 400 in just one year - and 980 million unique Aadhar identities crucial for executing subsidies and other connected programmes.
 
ICANN 55 is one of periodic public meetings organised in different continents to encourage global participation.
 
Founded in 1998, ICANN is a not-for-profit partnership dedicated to keep the internet secure, stable, interoperable, promote competition and develop policy.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Verizon to Pay $1.35 Million to Settle Zombie Cookie Privacy Charges

The settlement is the latest sign that the FCC is stepping up privacy enforcement actions

 

 

Verizon agreed to pay $1.35 million to settle Federal Communications Commission charges that it violated customers' privacy when it used a hidden undeletable number to track cellphone users.

In the settlement, Verizon also agreed to make its unkillable "zombie" cookie opt-in, meaning that users are not tracked by default. Previously, users had been tracked by default unless they opted out.

 

However, the settlement does not apply to Verizon's tracking of its customers who visit the 40 percent of websites that use AOL's ad network. That is because Verizon owns AOL, and therefore it is not considered a third party that requires opt-in.

 

That means that unless Verizon users opt out, they can still be identified when they use their smartphone or tablet to browse Web pages containing AOL's tracking code.

 

The Verizon controversy dates back to the fall of 2014, when a flurry of news outlets, including Wired and ProPublica, reported that Verizon and AT&T were attaching tracking numbers to their subscribers' Internet activity, even when users opted out.

 

The tracking numbers could be used by websites to build a dossier about a person's behavior on mobile devices 2014 including which apps they use, what sites they visit and for how long.

 

Soon after, AT&T stopped using the controversial identifiers. But Verizon said it would keep using them 2014 and assured users on its website that "it is unlikely that sites and ad entities will attempt to build customer profiles" using its identifiers.

 

In January of 2015, ProPublica reported that an online advertising company was doing just what Verizon had promised wouldn't happen. A company called Turn was using Verizon's identifier to respawn tracking cookies that users had deleted. ProPublica dubbed the unkillable identifier a "zombie cookie."

 

Two days later, Turn said it would stop using the zombie cookie. And a few weeks later, Verizon also reversed course, and said users could now kill the previously unkillable cookie - but users still had to go in and fiddle with their privacy settings.

 

In October, Verizon said it would give the zombie cookie a new life as a way to boost the tracking abilities of its AOL subsidiary.

 

The new settlement is the latest sign that the FCC is stepping up privacy enforcement actions. The FCC chairman has said that the agency will soon propose new privacy rules for Internet providers.

 

In the Verizon case, the agency alleged that the company's actions violated the privacy protections of the Communications Act. It also said Verizon violated the commission's Open Internet rules, which requires telecommunications carriers to be transparent about the use of their customer's proprietary information, and to only use to provide services.

 

Verizon spokeswoman Adria Tomaszewski said that the FCC order would not change the company's current practices because it had already stopped using the super-cookie in all cases except sharing with its AOL network.

 

"Over the past year, we have made several changes to our advertising programs that have provided consumers with even more options," Tomaszewski said. "Today's settlement with the FCC recognizes that."

 

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter.

 

 

 

 

 

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