Money & Banking
FSLRC working group on banking reforms endorses new organisation structure for urban cooperative banks

To remove the propensity of cooperative banks to follow borrower-oriented policies rather than policies that protect the interests of the depositors, it is necessary to have new a organisational structure of the Board of Management and Board of Directors

The Working Group (WG) set up by Banking Financial Sector Legislative Reforms Commission (FSLRC), has endorsed policy recommendations of the Malegam Committee for creating a new organisation structure for urban cooperative banks (UCBs) to deal with the issue of dual control.

 

The WG headed by Kishori Udeshi, former deputy governor of the Reserve Bank of India said, “any cooperative society accepting deposits exceeding a specified value must fall within the regulator purview of the banking regulator (Reserve Bank of India-RBI).”

 

At present, cooperative banks are regulated under Part V of the Banking Regulations Act, 1949, but several provisions in the Act are not applicable to them. For example, collection of deposits from members or shareholders is not treated as accepting public deposits. Deposits are accepted by enrolling members on tap and by collecting nominal amounts from them, exposing such depositors to serious risks, the report said.

 

According to the WG report, only borrowers of co-operative societies are eligible to be its members and thus contribute to its share capital. “The members of the board of these societies are elected by the borrowers, resulting in policies which are not always in the interests of depositors. This necessitates regulatory intervention to remove the propensity of these societies to follow borrower-oriented policies rather than policies that protect the interests of the depositors,” it added.

 

RBI has powers over banking companies and their management under BR Act, 1949, but does not have similar powers over co-operative banks under the Act. This issue of unequal treatment has also been highlighted by the Committee on Financial Sector Assessment (CFSA). This dual regulation cannot be addressed completely without amending the Constitution of India. However, a partial solution to the problem is to address the issue within the overall limits of the Constitution, by separating the boards of the co-operative society and separating the regulation of banking business from the co-operative business. The banking business should be brought fully within the purview of the RBI, the WG said in its report.

 

The WG says such exclusions should be removed and cooperative banks must be treated at par with banking companies.

 

The Malegam Committee, in its report has recommended creation of new organisation structure for UCBs consisting of a Board of Management (BoM) in addition to the Board of Directors. It said, the Boards would be elected in accordance with the provisions of the respective State Co-operative Societies Acts or the Multi-State Co-operative Act, 2002 and would be regulated and controlled by the Registrar of Co-operative Societies.

 

“The Boards would establish a BOM, which shall be entrusted with the responsibility for the control and direction of the affairs of the bank assisted by a chief executive officer (CEO) who shall have the responsibility for the management of the bank. The RBI would have powers to control and regulate the functioning of the Bank and of its BOM and of the CEO in exactly the same way as it controls and regulates the functioning of the board and the chief executive in the case of a commercial bank,” the WG report said.

 

This panel, which was set up in March 2011, had in October 2012 released an approach paper.

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COMMENTS

nagesh kini

4 years ago

A co-op. bank is a bank alright.There are no valid reasons whatsoever to keep them out of the reach of the banking regulator - the RBI.
In Maharashtra we have the Mah. State Co-op. Bank that calls itself the "Apex Bank" or whatever it means. It was mandated that all cooperatives incl. housing societies must park their sinking funds with the MSCB. With NPAs touching a high of 70% an Administrator is managing this.
One Bombay High Court Justice advised that no funds be parked with such banks.
The Mumbai-based Saraswat Co-op. bank has a dictatorial chairman who overrules his MD and the entire Board, forcing the professional elected directors to put in their papers.
Now that Mr. Gupta points out that the conditions in Kolkatta are no better, it is time that all, repeat ALL, banks are subjected to RBI over sight, here and now.

MK Gupta

4 years ago

With due respect, a management committee of a cooperative bank (or, for that matter, any registered body dealing with/in finance), does not and must never act on subjective basis but objevtively having rtegard to the guidelines precribed for coop. societies/banks. Moreover, even coop. banks must be made to be brought under the RBI discipline so as to ensure that the finances are not left to the subjective discretion of the board of management to be disbursed as per their whims disregarding the basic principles of the well established GFR in the central govt. (which, of course, are conspicuous in their non-observance by the top bureaucrats). In the given context, what is imperative is to make the coop banks fully professional and compelled to be run as per prescribed guidelines of the RBI and NBFCs. The West Bengal experience of failed coop banks must act as a warning in this slippery field. In India, coop movements fail (as in the case of Delhi's corrupt and shady Coop housing societies) due to rampant corruption in connivance with the officials of the Registrars'offices.

nagesh kini

4 years ago

This is just the right case of the Mumbai-based Saraswat Co-operative Bank, a multi-state coop. bank that has an autocratic chairman who is seen to be single-handedly bull dozing the Board. A number of professional directors have quit in disgust.
The sooner the recommendations are implemented the better, at least for this bank whose chairman does not care for the RBI or the Coop. Registrar.

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Nifty, Sensex will attempt to stabilise: Thursday Closing Report

Nifty will try to find a foothold around 5,600 and attempt a rally till 5,700 in a laboured manner

 
The market decline continued for the fifth day, paring its gains in the second half of the trading session, on weak global cues and selling in rate-sensitive sectors. The Nifty will try to find a foothold around 5,600 and attempt a rally till 5,700 in a laboured manner. The National Stock Exchange (NSE) reported a volume of 74.62 crore shares and advance-decline ratio of 414:1120.
 
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BSE Consumer Durables (up 0.78%); BSE TECk (up 0.60%) and BSE IT (up 0.27%) were the only gainers in the sectoral space. The losers were led by BSE Realty (down 2.91%); BSE Power (down 2.38%); BSE Capital Goods (down 2.30%); BSE Auto (down 2.23%) and BSE PSU (down 1.19%).
 
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The top two B Group gainers on the BSE were—Karma Energy (up 18.13%) and Gini Silk Mills (up 17.70%).
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Of the 50 stocks on the Nifty, 13 ended in the green. The key gainers were Bharti Airtel (up 6.05%); ICICI Bank (down 3.07%); HDFC (up 2.15%); Mahindra & Mahindra (up 1.45%) and UltraTech Cement Company (up 1.36%). The major losers were Reliance Infrastructure (down 6.56%); Jaiprakash Associates (down 6.44%); Bank of Baroda (down 4.89%); Tata Power (down 4.37%) and Tata Motors (down 4.24%).
 
Markets in Asia closed mostly lower on concerns about the bailout to Cyprus and a threat by North Korea to attack US military bases in Guam and Japan.
 
The Shanghai Composite gained 0.30%; the Nikkei 225 surged 1.34%; the Straits Times advanced 0.59% and the Taiwan Weighted 0.18%. On the other hand, the Hang Seng fell 0.14%; the Jakarta Composite declined 0.60%; the KLSE Composite shed 0.05% and the Seoul Composite dropped 0.445.
 
At the time of writing, the key European markets were down between 0.75% and 1.15% while the US stock futures were marginally in the red.
 
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COMMENTS

Vinay Joshi

4 years ago

Wishful a thinking! Talk Nifty 5450-5500 bottoming it out.

Regards,

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