Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Four recent examples which show real life is imitating the movies (The Funny Side)
You know that movie where someone jumps out of a building and lands safely on a passing truck? I think it was called Pretty Much Every Movie Ever.
 
Well, a reader sent me a link to that exact clip -- only it was a real-life news report. A building in Hebei, in the north of China, was ablaze, and several people jumped out of high windows on to a truck filed with vegetables, escaping completely unharmed.
 
Makes you think, right? Next time you've finished work and the lifts going down are full, check the passing traffic. Perhaps the Uber people could provide options. "I'd like to order a truck of vegetables outside my building at 5.30, please." "Certainly, sir, cabbage or lettuce?"
 
This correspondent has noticed that "life-is-a-movie" items usually appear in batches, as if Destiny decides to recycle old film storylines for a while.
 
The same day a reader sent me a link to another news video of real life imitating art: A beaver was seen guiding a herd of 150 cows in Canada. Perhaps the beaver had actually seen the movie Babe, about a pig doing the work of a sheepdog, and wanted to try it himself. Beavers are smaller than pigs and cows are bigger than sheep, so real life beats the movie.
 
A third example arrived a day later. A man broke up with his girlfriend and went off to marry someone else. The annoyed girlfriend turned up at his wedding with a gun and took him away. Police thought it was so movie-like that it must have been staged.
 
I would agree, except for one crucial thing: The incident happened at an Indian wedding, which is famous as vortexes in which anything can happen.
 
Example: At a recent wedding in Uttar Pradesh, the bride refused to marry the groom after discovering that he'd provided a meat-free banquet. She instead married a man from among the wedding guests.
 
Reports of brides marrying wedding guests are not uncommon in India, and it puzzles me that ANY single men dare to attend such ceremonies.
 
Several times a year, young men must come home and have the following conversation. MOM: "How was your roommate's wedding?" SON: "The usual. By the way, meet my wife, Aditi."
 
A fourth news report in this category arrived that night. Two people in the US state of Washington discovered that they were born on the same day of the same month of the same year in the same town -- and eventually learned they were twins. Yes, it's the exact plot of the hit movie "The Parent Trap". But that's about two young girls.
 
In the real life version, a man and a woman found they were twins after they got married. The scientific term for this is "awkward". No doubt they are taking classes in Sibling Rivalry and Cutting Remarks so they can be "normal".
 
If Destiny is reading this, can I put in a request for the movie "Almost Famous" to come true? In that film, the beautiful Kate Hudson falls in love with a not-very-good, not-very-famous journalist.
 
Real-life Kate, whoever you are, I'm here.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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ED seizes Rs 7 cr of Delhi jewellers in Panama Papers case
The Enforcement Directorate on Thursday said it has seized Rs 7 crore of Delhi-based Mehrasons Jewellers in connection with its probe into the foreign exchange violations revealed in the Panama Papers leak case.
 
The ED in an official statement said it has seized Rs 7 crore lying in various bank accounts in India related to A.K. Mehra, Deepak Mehra, Shailini Mehra and Naveen Mehra of Mehrasons Jewellers of Delhi, which was its first seizure under Section 37 A of the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999.
 
The ED investigation revealed that huge amounts were sent out of India by the four accused by mis-utilizing the Liberalised Remittance Scheme (LRS) of the Reserve Bank of India in the garb of making investments abroad. 
 
"The amount remitted outside India was given as interest-free loan in individual capacity by the said persons to two companies in the Bahamas and British Virgin Islands and later, transferred to a company in the United Arab Emirates, which is owned by one of said persons," the agency said. 
 
The agency also claimed that around Rs 10.54 crore was still illegally parked outside India by the said persons.
 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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RIL, BP to invest Rs40,000 crore in energy projects in India
Reliance Industries (RIL) and British energy major BP on Thursday annnouced the creation of a joint venture energy vertical to work across the entire value chain, involving investment of $6 billion, or Rs 40,000 crore.
 
This would also develop their existing deep water gas fields in India's eastern offshore to bring to fresh production 1 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas by 2022.
 
"We will invest Rs 40,000 crore over many years as new investment to bring in 30-35 million cubic metres of gas in next three-to-five years and sustain it over seven-to-eight years," Reliance Industries Chairman Mukesh Ambani said at a press briefing here. 
 
The "solid relationship between our two companies is a great example of what can be achieved while working together at scale", he added.
 
Ambani said RIL was investing together with its eastern offshore KG basin gas fields' consortium partner BP after a gap of 6 years.
 
The first project of the tie-up is to develop already discovered R-series gas fields in Block KGD6, approximately 70 km off India's east coast. A dry gas development project in water-depths of more than 2,000 metres, the project is expected to produce up to 12 million cubic metres of gas a day after going on-stream in 2020.
 
"India holds great promise for future," BP CEO Bob Dudley said, adding that tie-up was an important step for BP in India. 
 
"Reliance and BP are now able to develop these major deep water gas resources offshore India efficiently and economically. It is testament to our commitment to working in partnership with Reliance and with the government to produce more energy in India, for India," he said.
 
BP plans to submit development plans for the next two projects for government approval before the end of 2017. Development of the three projects is expected to bring a total 30-35 million cubic metres of gas a day onstream, phased over 2020-2022. 
 
India consumes over 5 billion cubic feet (141.5 million cubic metres) a day of natural gas.
 
Earlier, Dudley met Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
 
Apart from the three projects, the two companies have also agreed for strategic cooperation, under which they will jointly explore options to develop differentiated fuels, mobility and advanced low carbon energy businesses in India, Ambani said.
 
BP had entered into a partnership with RIL in 2011 with a 30 per cent stake in multiple oil and gas blocks operated by RIL in India, including KGD6. Since then, the two companies have invested over Rs 10,000 crore ($1.6 billion) in deepwater exploration and production up to May 2017, according to information given by RIL.
 
Queried multiple times about their ongoing arbitration disputes with the Indian government, the consortium said that it were the change in policies made by the current NDA government that had guided this investment decision designed to meet the energy needs of the Indian consumer, which effort would then be upscaled at a global level.
 
"We still have some pending arbitrations and we hope to follow this legal process to conclude these within the framework of the law," Ambani said, referring to the arbitrations cases on shortfall in KG-D6 targeted gas output and on alleged seepage of gas from contiguous fields of state-run ONGC.
 
"We're pretty sure of a fair outcome of these proceedings, and which will not come in the way of future investments. Because you have arbitration, you don't stop all businesses," he added.
 
Dudley pointed out that a lot of such arbitration issues crop up around the world, which are then resolved. He said the change in government policies over the last few years had chiefly guided this major investment decision and also expressed satisfaction over the pricing policy for domestic natural gas for producing from difficult deep sea areas.
 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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