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Hindustan Unilever reports robust results; net profit up 14.65%

The fast moving consumer goods company has delivered another robust quarter, despite a difficult economy, driven by strong showing in both home and personal care as well as domestic consumer divisions

Hindustan Unilever, one of India’s leading fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) company, has come out with very positive results, despite intense competition, a benign economy and uncertainty over inflation. The company has reported 12% year-on-year (y-o-y) increase in net sales to Rs6465.81 crore for the quarter ended 31 March 2013. Likewise, its net profit is up 14.65% y-o-y, and touched Rs787.20 crore for the March 2013 quarter. This was driven by strong performances in domestic consumer business as well as home and personal care divisions. During the quarter, the domestic consumer business grew 13% with strong 6% underlying volume growth. Both home and personal care (HPC) and foods & beverages (F&B) registered double digit growth.
 

Earlier this year, we had recommended the stock at Rs473.95 (please refer to our Long Term section of the Moneylife magazine). Currently, at time of writing the piece, the stock is quoting at Rs498.50 on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE).
 

Analysis of Moneylife database on Hindustan Unilever reveals that the company has been one steady performer through thick and thin. Its net sales growth rate is equal to its three-quarter y-o-y growth rate of 12%. However, it is its operating profit that stood out, growing 17% y-o-y, beating its average three-quarter y-o-y growth rate of 15%. Such is the quality of cost control. Its return on networth and return on capital were extraordinary high at 108% and 123% respectively, which means the company is also commanding premium valuations. Its market capitalisation stood at over 25 times operating profit.
 

Exceptional items during the March 2013 quarter included reduction in provision for retirement benefits of Rs10.39 crore and restructuring costs of Rs98 lakh. Also, during the March 2013 quarter, the company had entered into a share purchase agreement with promoters of M/s Aquagel Chemicals Pvt Ltd for acquisition of 74% of the equity share capital of ACPL. The company was earlier holding an investment of 26% of its equity share capital. Therefore, Aquagel has become a wholly-owned subsidiary with effect from 1 April 2013.
 

While commodity costs were relatively benign during the quarter, competitive intensity remained at high levels. They continue to push brands vis-à-vis advertising & promotion, which is up Rs144 crore (+90 bps) in the quarter.
 

Other divisions too performed well, too. Soaps & detergents witnessed broad-based growth and grew 13%. Personal products grew 12%, driven by acceleration of its hair & oral care segments. Beverages saw robust growth across portfolio, and grew 18%. Packaged foods grew 7%. Surprisingly, its ice cream division did not perform well due to “slowdown in the market”.
 

Harish Manwani, chairman HUL, commented: “In a challenging environment, we have delivered broad based competitive growth and margin improvement. We have continued to invest in strengthening our brands, stepped up innovation and driven in-market execution and operational efficiencies even harder. At the same time, we are making good progress on our Sustainable Living Plan agenda. While there are near term concerns around slowing market growth and inflationary pressures on consumers, we are confident of the medium to long term growth prospects of the FMCG sector and remain focused on delivering consistent and competitive growth with sustainable operating margin improvement.”
 

The board of directors has proposed a final dividend of Rs6 per share for the financial year ending 31 March, 2013, subject to the approval of the shareholders at the annual general meeting. Together with interim dividend of Rs4.50 per share and special dividend of Rs8 per share, the total dividend for the financial year ending 31 March, 2013 amounts to Rs18.50 per share.
 

For more information on other companies’ results, check here

User

Aadhaar: Private ownership of UID data- Part I

As per the report of the TAG-UP Committee headed by Nandan Nilekani, government data and databases would be privatised through the creation of NIUs, which will then ‘own’ the data and the government would become a ‘customer’ to whoever controls the data!

It is no secret that data is the new property. The potential for evolving technologies to record, collate, converge, retrieve, mine, share, profile and otherwise conjure with data has given life to this form of property, and to spiralling ambitions around it. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) was set up with its push to enrol the entire Indian resident population, and with Nandan Nilekani as both its chairman and as chair of committees set up by Dr Manmohan Singh’s government. In this set-up, we are witnessing the emergence of an information infrastructure, which the government helps—by financing and facilitating the ‘start-up’, and by the use of coercion to get people on to the database—which it will then hand over to corporate interests when it reaches a ‘steady state’.

 

Since Mr Nilekani was appointed the chairperson of the UIDAI, in the rank of a Cabinet minister, he has chaired multiple committees, each of which pushes for the collection of data and the creation of databases, and steers the government to become a customer of whoever controls the database. Several reports on e-governance as part of the report of the National Knowledge Commission: Report to the Nation 2006-2009 as well as Report of the Committee for Unified Toll Collection Technology (June 2010), the National e-governance plan (November 2011, Background Papers), Interim Report of the Task Force on direct transfer of subsidies on kerosene (June 2011), LPG and fertiliser’ Report of the Task Force on IT Strategy and an implementable solution for the direct transfer of subsidy for food and kerosene (October 2011: Final report), Report of the Task Force on an Aadhaar-enabled unified payment infrastructure (February 2012), and, of course, the TAG-UP report, are testimony to how Mr Nilekani has been used to promote a set of database-related ambitions.

 

It was in the January 2011 report of the Nilekani-chaired Technology Advisory Group on Unique Projects (TAG-UP) that the framework for the private ownership of databases was elaborated and explained. These were about databases constructed out of data that is given to the government to hold in a fiduciary capacity, and expected to be used for specified, and limited, purposes. The Nilekani Committee report directly dealt with five projects—Goods and Services Tax Network (GSTN), Tax Information Network (TIN), Expenditure Information Network (EIN), National Treasury Management Agency (NTMA) and the New Pension System (NPS). It recommended that the suggested framework “be more generally applicable to the complex IT-intensive systems, which are increasingly coming to prominence in the craft of Indian public administration”.

 

As the Nilekani Committee understood it, the government has two major tasks: policymaking and implementation. Implementation is fettered by absence of leadership and active ownership of projects, outdated recruitment processes and methodology, inability to pay market salaries for specialised skills, lack of avenues for continued enhancement of professional skills and career growth, non-conducive work environment, outdated performance evaluation and preference for seniority over merit, and untimely transfer of officers. Rather than expend time on finding correctives to the system, the Nilekani committee found in this an opportunity for private business interest. Without further ado, and without considering, for instance the capacities and deficiencies in privatising databases, and what this means for citizens and residents, the Nilekani committee found its answer in National Information Utilities (NIUs).

 

“NIUs would be private companies with a public purpose: profit-making, not-profit maximising”. The government would have “strategic control”, that is, it would be focussed on how it would achieve the objectives and outcomes, leaving the NIU ‘flexible’ in its functioning. Total private ownership should be at least 51%. The government should have at least 26% share. Once it reaches a steady state, the government would be a “paying customer” and, as a paying customer, “the government would be free to take its business to another NIU”. Except, of course, given the “large upfront sunk-cost, economies of scale, and network externalities from a surrounding ecosystem (and what this means is not explained any further), NIUs are ... essentially set up as natural monopolies”.

 

The Nilekani Committee evinces a deep disinterest in the various rungs of government. It asks for the “total support and involvement of the top management within the government” -- words reflecting the UIDAI’s experience, with the Prime Minister and Montek Singh Ahluwalia being its staunch supporters, and much of the rest of the administration seemingly unclear about what the project entails. To get a buy-in from the bureaucracy, “in-service officers” are to be deployed in the NIUs and are to be given an allowance of 30% of their remuneration.

 

“Once the rollout is completed,” the Nilekani committee says, “the government’s role shifts to that of a customer.”

 

On the question of open source, the Nilekani committee “recognises the intellectual property of the NIU”, but considers that it may be counterproductive to the business planning and profitability of the NIU to release all source as open source.

 

The report is littered with references to the UIDAI, and suggests that the way the UIDAI has been functioning is what an NIU should use as its model.

 

What emerges is this:

Governmental data and databases are to be privatised through the creation of NIUs, which will then `own’ the data;

NIUs will be natural monopolies;

NIUs will use the data and the database to be profit-making and not profit-maximising, and the definition of these terms may, of course, vary;

Government will support the NIUs through funding them till they reach a steady state, and by doing what is needed to gather the data and create the database using governmental authority;

Once the NIU reaches steady state, the government will reappear as the customer of the NIU;

Government officers will be deployed in NIUs and be paid 30% over their salaries, which, even if the report does not say it explicitly, is expected to forge loyalties and vested interests;

The notion of holding citizens’ data in a fiduciary capacity cedes place to the vesting of ownership over citizens’ data in an entity which will then have the government as their customer.

 

This notion of private companies owning our data has not been discussed with state governments, nor with people from whom information is being collected. This might have been treated as another report without a future; except, in the budget presented by Pranab Mukherjee as finance minister in March 2012, he announced that the “GSTN (Goods and Sales Tax Network) will be set up as a National Information Utility”.

 

The NIU was not explained to Parliament, and no one seems to have raised any questions about what it is. This, then, is the story of how the ownership of governmental data by private entities is silently slipping into the system.

 

(Dr Usha Ramanathan is an independent law researcher on jurisprudence, poverty and rights.)

User

COMMENTS

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

To be very frank of all things UPA has made a mockery of the country. Looks as if they have no love for the country.

At such an age RAHUL GANDHI IS NOT DISCLOSING his marriage and our great media is silent. Any other plans?

Dayananda Kamath k

4 years ago

is it a scheme to bailout infosys as it is loosing its credibility.

REPLY

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to Dayananda Kamath k 4 years ago

Feel so, because what I feel Mr Murty is very powerful and there was a talk of his becoming PREZ but before .............became so might be a quid pro for the same.

p s d

4 years ago

This is a preposterous preposition indeed! In US and many other countries in the western world, citizen ID card has been opposed since it compromises the personal identity. These countries oppose this move even the information is to be owned by a democratic state. Now Nilekani and company want to own it privately. Even in communist China Hukou personal ID card, that is issued only in a place where you are born, is a hated document since state uses it to divide the people. In this commercial world driven by businesses such personal information has unparalleled value. America trained Nilekani will be, knowingly or unknowingly, give this vital classified information into private hands. God save India!!
PSD

REPLY

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to p s d 4 years ago

ONLY GOD IS SAVING OUR COUNTRY, OTHERWISE THESE POLITICIANS MIGHT HAVE TAKEN IT TO DOCS......?

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to p s d 4 years ago

Do agree

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

If you look at the contracts INFOSYS has bagged MCA from TCS and debated on this forum.(Regarding non working of MCA)

Mandar Kulkarni

4 years ago

We cannot expect UPA government to do anything good for our country. So they will push for this dangerous UID Aadhaar scheme illegally. But what is more disturbing is that entire opposition is absolutely quiet on UID and not taking any efforts to scrap this project and stop wastage of tax payer's money.

REPLY

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to Mandar Kulkarni 4 years ago

Who said they will do good for the country, Bas desh ko baksh de wahi bahut hai.

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to Mandar Kulkarni 4 years ago

Why not come out the in the open against Aadhar card in particular and against the opposition to wake them up from the slumber they are in.

Krishnan

4 years ago

What happened to the suit filed in HC / SC in this regard.
N.Krishnan

Anil Kumar

4 years ago

Not sure, how Infosys has executed state of the art projects under the leadership of NN. Looking at interaction with UID programme at operating level and the quality of people who are running it,I have serious doubts about execution capabilities of NN.

Would NN and/or Govt consider supporting my business till it comes in 'steady state' and assuring a perpetual market too by becoming a customer?

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

Ms Usha-Does the present dispensation want to clean the country high and dry.

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

WHY IS MMSINGH/PC CHIDAMBARAM G's feel respect is earned by their action and lost through deed, feel they have lost G's which they should try to earn by their positive actions

SuchindranathAiyerS

4 years ago

Yet one more view that differs somewhat from ManmohanG Singh Saheb, Tiru.Da.Chidambaram G, and others.

MOHAN SIROYA

4 years ago

Entire "Aadhaar Card" scheme appears to be turning into another RACKET of the Government, this time directly involving the innocent Indian individuals.
Besides , the open ends of mis use and unofficial money making loop- holes, it has stopped being useful even as an ID proof. To save cost, the job of Bio-metric and other data entry at the time of Enrollment is entrusted to the private agencies who employ, almost illiterate but only who has learnt a PC operation.
Take for instance my own case.
In Feb. I had received my Aadhaar Card wherein my 'Gender' is shown wrongly as "F" instead of "M". I was unable to rectify ONLINE,as was tomtommed , so I sent my request with relvant documentary proof for change to the Regional Office at Mumbai.
The office itself is big HOAX. All the contact nos. or EIDs, Fax nos are dysfunctional.My received request is simply pending unacknowledged or un-acted for last two months. ONLINE Feedback of UIDAI.Gov.in has also been in vain.

REPLY

Vinay Joshi

In Reply to MOHAN SIROYA 4 years ago

You're lucky, you were not shown as tree or dog or other inanimate object as has happened in thousands of cases & tens of thousands cards could not be delivered on bogus address.

Regards,

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to MOHAN SIROYA 4 years ago

Told before also it is a very big scam with top guns involved of Industry and POLITICS

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

I have heard that UID is having unofficial HO at Infosys (though I have yet to verify)

REPLY

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

In Reply to CA PRADEEP AGARWAL 4 years ago

I feel the best person to answer is the author of this article/or Editors of MLF.

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

Dear Mr Basu/Dalal,

Hurry might not be there to gobble funds which I suppose might see the end of the road for Congress politicians.

Regards

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

I feel next fight will be on DATA and that is before fight for water.

CA PRADEEP AGARWAL

4 years ago

Main thing why is the Establishment in Delhi such a hurry to transfer funds through Aadhar?

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