Citizens' Issues
Electrocution victims get Rs.33 lakh after NHRC intervention
New Delhi : Following the intervention of the NHRC, the Uttar Pradesh government has paid Rs.33.40 lakh to people who were electrocuted when their bus came in contact with an unguarded low-lying high-tension line in the state's Fatehpur district.
 
As per the National Human Rights Commission, the state government was earlier reluctant to pay compensation to the victims, saying the line was drawn in accordance with the prescribed standards.
 
However, not satisfied with this response, the NHRC called for an inquiry by the chief electrical inspector.
 
"Subsequently, the director of electrical security, government of Uttar Pradesh, in his inquiry report, revealed that the height of the overhead transmission line was less than the standard height prescribed under the rules, i.e, 5.8 metres," said a statement from the NHRC.
 
The incident took place when the bus came in contact with the high-tension line while parking at the Amauli Road bus stand in Jahanabad area of Fatehpur on October 23, 2012.
 
The NHRC said the compensation included a total of Rs.28 lakh to the next of kin of 14 deceased and Rs.40,000 to those who suffered injuries. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Headley's cross-examination deferred to Wednesday
Mumbai : The cross-examination of Pakistani-American terrorist turned approver David Headley in the 26/11 Mumbai terror attack case, which was scheduled to start on Tuesday, has been postponed by a day, an official said on Monday.
 
The deferment follows intimation from one of Headley's attorneys who is unwell and who requested the proceedings to start on Wednesday, Special Public Prosecutor Ujjwal Nikam said.
 
The court has ordered accordingly and now the cross-examination will be taken up from Wednesday, for four days, Nikam added.
 
Headley's cross-examination in a special court will be done for four days by Abdul Wahab Khan, lawyer of Sayed Zabiuddin Ansari alias Abu Jundal, who is also facing trial in the 26/11 terror attack case.
 
Headley, 56, has already confessed to having done substantial ground work, intelligence gathering and providing other inputs to his handlers in Pakistan ahead of the terror strikes in Mumbai beginning on November 26, 2008, which killed 166 people and left over 600 injured.
 
His examination in chief was done by Nikam between February 8 and 13 after Headley agreed to turn approver in return for a pardon by the Indian authorities.
 
The proceedings were conducted before Additional Sessions Judge G.A. Sanap via video-conferencing from a jail in the US.
 
Nikam has already said that, if required, the prosecution may re-examine Headley at a later stage after the cross-examination.
 
Headley, convicted in the US for his role in the terror attack and the Denmark attacks plots, is currently serving a 35-year sentence in a US jail.
 
During his marathon deposition before the Special Court last month, he admitted to his links with the Lashkar-e-Taiba, Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence, Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda and other terror groups, the role of various state and non-state actors, conducting seven spying missions in Mumbai prior to the 26/11 attacks, besides divulging other sensational information to his handlers in Pakistan.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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'40 percent people in India may not have water to drink by 2030'
New Delhi : Forty percent of India's population may not have drinking water by 2030, if the water crisis in country is not met seriously, a study has warned.
 
With the country facing a grave water crisis and lack of water conservation, the availability of potable water and ground water has decreased over the years which would result in severe situation in the country after a decade, said an activist for water conservation on the eve of World Water Day (March 22) observed to create awareness about water related issues and for action to deal with the global water crisis.
 
"By 2030, 40 percent of the total population in the country will not have drinking water if situation remains same," Jal Jan Jodo Abhiyan's national convenor Sanjay Singh told IANS, quoting a research published recently by the 2030 Water Resource Group (WRG).
 
"The ground water is depleting, the small tributaries have dried up to 90 percent and the flow of rivers has reduced by 60-65 percent. This will lead to a severe situation in the coming years reducing water availability to a great extent," he added.
 
He also said that the per capita demand has increased whereas the availability is very less. In fact, a report on ground water published by PRS Legislative Research --a non-governmental organisation -- says: "Due to increasing population, the national per capita annual availability of water has reduced by 15 percent from 2001 to 2011."
 
It also said that India uses almost twice the amount of water to grow crops as compared to China and the US.
 
"The gap between the availability and demand is increasing at a greater pace. Cities like Bengaluru, Delhi, Mumbai and other metropolitan cities consume water in huge quantities due to changed lifestyle of people. This must be looked into," Singh told IANS.
 
He also said that the efforts done by the government were not enough to meet the crisis.
 
South Asia Network on Dam, Rivers and People coordinator Himanshu Thakkar says water crisis in the country is multidimensional and is aggravating fast because of various factors including mismanagement of the resource.
 
He anticipates big problems based on the water crisis looming large in the country, if the situation continues.
 
"Ground water is the lifeline of the country which is depleting very fast. Water is part of ecological system as every living thing on earth needs water so if not dealt with properly the perennial water crisis may lead to more serious problems like food crisis, livelihood crisis, social conflicts," Thakkar told IANS.
 
He said that social conflicts based on water crisis have already started in the country. Tension between Haryana and Punjab over Sutlej-Yamuna Link Canal project and conflicts in Marathwada region of Maharashtra over water are the latest examples.
 
"In terms of water crisis in India things have now come to such a pass that a district collector in Latur district in Maharashtra had to implement section 144 to avoid clashes between people due to water crisis," Thakkar told IANS.
 
Blaming the government in general being the major contributor towards the crisis, Thakkar said the government machinery was solely responsible for failing in water management.
 
"Government is responsible for water crisis in terms of mismanagement. The government does not involve people in the management of water. This year is a drought year so the problem has increased manifold but the efforts of the government does not seem sufficient to deal with the crisis," he said.
 
About the water crisis in Delhi, he said that mismanagement on part of governments can be seen easily as in February, Jat protesters took over Munak canal in Haryana stopping water supply to the national capital and it took over a fortnight to deal with the consequences.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

jaideep shirali

11 months ago

Unless the State and Central governments emphasize on conservation of water in any season, things will get worse with every year. Add to that the reckless disregard for the environment that we have been seeing especially in the last few years. The problem is that we have lots of schemes on paper, but the only water is the black money that flows into the pockets of politicians and their cronies. Maharashtra is a classic example, though I'm sure this problem is repeated across India. Latur had its own man in the CM's seat not so long ago, what did his government do, that people in Latur are fighting over water ?

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