EC not to intervene with regard to Jagan's arrest

The Commission is not in a position to do anything in this regard as the matter was sub- judice and a legal process was on

New Delhi: The Election Commission is understood to have decided not to intervene in the matter concerning the arrest of YSR Congress chief Jaganmohan Reddy, whose mother has sought his release in view of the coming bypolls in Andhra Pradesh, reports PTI.

The three-member Election Commission met on Tuesday under the chairmanship of Chief Election Commissioner Dr SY Quraishi and discussed the letter from YS Vijayalakshmi, YSR Congress honorary president, seeking a direction from the Commission for her son's release.

Top sources in the EC said the Commission was not in a position to do anything in this regard as the matter was sub- judice and a legal process was on.

The Commission will make clear its position in a communication to Vijayalakshmi, they said.

Jagan was arrested by CBI in a disproportionate assets case on Sunday and was lodged in a Hyderabad jail yesterday after a court remanded him in judicial custory for 14 days.

Against this backdrop, Vijayalakshmi had written to the CEC pleading for his release so that Jagan could campaign in the 12th June bypolls to 18 assembly constituencies and one Lok Sabha seat in Andhra Pradesh.

The party had also decided yesterday that she would lead the campaign in Jagan's absence.

Urging for conduct of free and fair elections, Vijayalakshmi had said, "I am writing this letter with great hope that you would kindly intervene (in the matter)...

"CBI arrested him (Jagan) on 27th May, just 15 days before the by-elections...This is part of a larger conspiracy to deprive his participation in the elections with the sole objective of helping the ruling Congress candidates."

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MCA refers Reebok fraud case to SFIO

The Reebok fraud has now been referred to the Serious Fraud Investigation Office following a non-invasive scrutiny of the books of accounts of the Adidas unit in India

New Delhi: Corporate Affairs Minister Veerappa Moily on Tuesday said "something wrong" has been found in the books of Reebok India, which has accused two of its former top executives of a Rs870-crore fraud, reports PTI.

The minister also said the matter has now been referred to the Serious Fraud Investigation Office (SFIO) following a non-invasive scrutiny of the books of accounts of the sportswear maker.

"Prima facie, we have found something wrong in their (Reebok) books. The matter has now been referred to the SFIO for further investigation," Moily told reporters on the sidelines of an ASSOCHAM event.

He said the report of the non-invasive scrutiny, carried out by the Registrar of Companies (RoC), Delhi, was submitted yesterday to the ministry.

Last week, the ministry had ordered an enquiry into the books of accounts of Reebok's Indian arm over complaints of an alleged Rs 870-crore fraud. The enquiry was ordered on the basis of a complaint from an investor.

Reebok India had filed an FIR with the Gurgaon police last week alleging its former MD Subhinder Singh Prem and COO Vishnu Bhagat of Rs870 crore fraud by indulging in "criminal conspiracy" and "fraudulent" practices over a period of time.

While both Prem and Bhagat had denied the allegations, a local court on Saturday had rejected their anticipatory bail.

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Sophisticated spyware virus hit Iran and other ME countries

Security experts discovered the new data-stealing virus dubbed 'Flame' which they say has lurked inside thousands of computers across the Middle East for as long as five years

Jerusalem: An unprecedented "cyber espionage worm" considered the most sophisticated spyware virus yet unleashed, attributed to a "state player", has hit Iran and other Middle Eastern (ME) countries with the possible goal of foiling Tehran's nuclear ambitions, reports PTI.

Security experts discovered the new data-stealing virus dubbed 'Flame' which they say has lurked inside thousands of computers across the Middle East for as long as five years as part of a sophisticated cyber warfare campaign.

Russia-based Internet security company Kaspersky Lab that uncovered the virus 'Flame' said it is designed to collect and delete sensitive information.

Kaspersky, one of the world's biggest producers of anti- virus softwares, said the bug had infected computers in Iran, the West Bank, Sudan, Syria, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Egypt.

Flame is "actively being used as a cyber weapon attacking entities in several countries," Kaspersky said in a statement, describing its purpose as "cyber espionage".

"The complexity and functionality of the newly discovered malicious programme exceed those of all other cyber menaces known to date," the statement said.

The Internet security company also said that Flame contained a specific element that was used in the Stuxnet worm and which had not been seen in any other malware since.

On its blog, Kaspersky called Flame a "sophisticated attack toolkit," adding that it was much more complex than Duqu, the vehicle used to deliver Stuxnet.

The Stuxnet bug, discovered in June 2010, targeted primarily Iranian computers.

Iran admitted that the worm had damaged centrifuges operating at an uranium enrichment facility at Nantaz.

Kaspersky's chief malware expert Vitaly Kamluk told the BBC that more than 600 specific targets had been hit by Flame, including computers owned by individuals, businesses, academic institutions and government systems.

Kamluk said he believed the malware had been operating at least since August 2010, and probably earlier, adding that there was "no doubt" that it was developed by a "state actor".

Israel has described Iran's nuclear programme an "existential threat", vowing to use all "options on the table" to foil it.

Symantec, another Internet security firm, was quoted by daily Ha'aretz as saying on its blog that the bug's code was on par with that of Stuxnet and Duqu, which it described as "arguably the two most complex pieces of malware we have analysed to date."

It also said that certain file names in Flame were identical to those described in a hacking incident in April involving the Iranian oil ministry.

The worm had been operating discreetly for at least two years and was likely written by "an organized, well-funded group of people working to a clear set of directives," the firm stressed.

Symantec said the virus had also been found in computers in Hungary, Austria, Russia, Hong Kong and the United Arab Emirates.

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COMMENTS

pravsemilo

5 years ago

Israel is also affected by this.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-18238...

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