Citizens' Issues
E-mail inventor Ray Tomlinson dies at 74
New York : Internet pioneer Ray Tomlinson, who is credited with the invention of e-mail, has died at the age of 74, media reports said.
 
According to reports, Tomlinson died of an apparent heart attack late on Saturday.
 
The US computer programmer came up with the idea of electronic messages that could be sent from one network to another in 1971, BBC reported.
 
His invention included the ground-breaking use of the "@" symbol in e-mail addresses, which is now standard.
 
He sent what is now regarded as the first e-mail while working in Boston as an engineer for research company Bolt, Beranek and Newman.
 
The firm played a big role in developing an early version of the internet, known as Arpanet.
 
However, Tomlinson later said he could not remember what was in that first test message, describing it as "completely forgettable".
 
A BBC report said his work was recognised by his peers in 2012, when he was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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9 months ago

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What makes humans imagine?
New York : Scientists believe that humans possess the unique ability to imagine a never-before-seen object or concept, but there is little that we know about the neurological mechanism behind it.
 
A new experiment proposed by Andrey Vyshedskiy from Boston University may provide new insights into this mechanism by utilising currently available methods for isolating so-called "object neurons" in the human brain. 
 
According to Vyshedskiy, the imagination process can be called "mental synthesis" as it involves mentally combining familiar images, scenes or concepts. 
 
The experiment he suggested involves isolating any two object neurons and monitoring their neuronal activity when these two objects are imagined together for the very first time.
 
If two object neurons that fire only when a particular object is imagined can be identified, then the current experiment would seek to measure the firing activity when these two objects are imagined together. For example, an apple on top of a dolphin.
 
According to the research idea published in the Research Idea and Outcomes Journal, the subject's brain will trigger an increased firing rate in both object neurons and, more importantly, a synchronisation of their activities would occur. 
 
"Since researchers can often identify several object-selective neurons within a single patient, multiple novel pairings of objects can be studied," Andrey Vyshedskiy said. 
 
"Furthermore, morphing of more than two objects into one mental frame can also be investigated," he added.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Nearly half of America has damaged or lost smartphone
New York :  Nearly 49 percent American smartphone users have either broken or lost their devices summing up to almost 230,685,172 broken or lost mobile phones, a study by the US-based Verizon and KRC Research said.
 
About 43 percent of the people have damaged the device by dropping it in water and nearly 42 percent of them sent it through the wash.
 
Other embarrassing ways included throwing it, dropping it out of the window, spilling something on it, tripping and landing on it or finding their pet playing/chewing on it, the study said.
 
The study also revealed that on an average Americans broke or lost two mobile phones with lower the age the higher is the possibility of damage.
 
Two out of three millennials (those born between about 1980 and 2000) have damaged their devices and account for 67 percent of all the people who damaged their devices. Generation Xers (born between the mid-1960s and 1980) follow them at 58 percent.
 
Interestingly, 67 percent parents have broken or lost their mobile phones than phone owners without children (38 percent).
 
Fiftyfour percent of mobile phone owners drop their phone at least once a week, and 45 percent misplace their phone at least once a week, the survey revealed.
 
"Nearly half (46 percent) of millennials would cry over a broken or lost mobile phone, and just as many would replace it before they ever had to own up to how they broke or lost their mobile phone (45 percent)," the report said.
 
"One in four (26 percent) millennials would even lie about how they broke or lost it," the report added.
 
Rather than break or lose their mobile phone, one in three (34 percent) said they would prefer to lose other important items including their bed, keys, and even friends.
 
The survey was conducted online with 1,026 US adults from February 18 to February 21.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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