DRL launches generic version of mental disorder drug in US

Seroquel, which is used in the treatment of bipolar depression and bipolar mania-antipsyiotic, had US sales of approximately $4.6 billion last year, according to IMS Health.

Two days after expiry of AstraZeneca's blockbuster drug Seroquel (Quetiapine fumarate), Dr Reddy's Laboratories (DRL) announced the launch of the generic version of the drug in the US market.

The company has launched the drug in strengths of 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg and 400 mg.

Seroquel, which is used in the treatment of bipolar depression and bipolar mania-antipsyiotic, had US sales of approximately $4.6 billion last year, according to IMS Health.

“Dr Reddy's Laboratories announced today that it has launched Quetiapine fumarate tablets (25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg and 400 mg), a bio-equivalent generic version of Seroquel tablets in the US market on 27 March 2012, following the approval by the United States Food & Drug Administration of Dr Reddy's ANDA for Quetiapine fumarate tablets,” DRL said in a statement.

On 23 March 2012, the US District Court for the District of Columbia issued an opinion and order in AstraZeneca's lawsuit against the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding final marketing approval of generic quetiapine.

The Court denied the company's request for a preliminary injunction and dismissed the lawsuit.

In its lawsuit, AstraZeneca sought an injunction barring the FDA from granting final marketing approval of generic quetiapine until 2 December 2012, when regulatory exclusivity expires on important clinical trial data, or, alternatively, at least until a federal court had a meaningful opportunity to review imminent FDA action regarding the pending generic marketing applications.

Dr Reddy's Laboratories’ shares closed at Rs1,699 per share on the National Stock Exchange, 1.43% up from the previous close.

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Parle to launch new snacks, targets 25% mkt share

Parle Products has got positive response after the test phase launch of the new products in Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra this month

Biscuits manufacturer Parle Products, which entered the snacks business four years ago, will launch five new ‘Namkeen’ products within a year to garner 25% of the Rs8,000 crore market.

“We will launch various products in all the categories under snacks like traditional ‘namkeen’ and wafers to increase our market share to 20-25% within the next two years,” B Krishna Rao, group product manager of Parle Products, told PTI.

The company has got positive response after the test phase launch of the new products in Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra this month.

“We are taking lessons from these test launches. There are some distribution related issues. The competition is also not easy. But the response has been fairly good. By the end of FY13 we will launch it nationally,” he said.

At present, the Mumbai-based company has a small market share of 8% in the snacks segment which is dominated by big players like PepsiCo Frito-Lay, ITC and Haldiram’s.

It has ‘Full Toss’ to compete with PepsiCo-owned brand Kurkure and also has a presence in the wafers market.

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Public Interest Exclusive
Inaccurate voters’ list is a big problem that remains unsolved

Participants in the Moneylife Foundation’s event addressed by the Chief Election Commissioner share how big the problem of a wrong voters’ list is

“Keeping an accurate voters’ list is something we see as one of the most difficult tasks. Dead and bogus voters populate the voters list,” admitted Dr SY Quraishi, Chief Election Commissioner (CEC), speaking at a seminar organised by Moneylife Foundation and V Citizens Action Network (VCAN) on Tuesday.

While answering to a question raised by Mrs Indrani Malkani, trustee of VCAN, about the voters’ list being highly inflated due to non-deletion of names of deceased persons, Dr Quraishi said, “It is indeed a serious problem. But Election Commission (EC) has to manage the entire country with only 600 staff. And there are lots of responsibilities that we have to take care of.”

Mrs Malkani had pointed out that there are many names in the voters’ lists of people who were no more. However, though it is the duty of the family members to notify the authorities of births and deaths, many do not do so. She said, “The state of Maharashtra has issued a circular, which says that co-operative housing societies must assist the booth level officers (BLOs) in making an accurate voters’ list.” Praful Vora, spokesperson for India Against Corruption, also highlighted the issue of bogus voters.

Dr Quraishi agreed and said that in Uttar Pradesh, the EC identified 53 lakh deceased voters whose names were still in the lists, and had them removed. Similarly, 83 lakh missing voters were identified; who had shifted to other states, but there was no way to ensure whether they would be coming back or not.

“These dead or missing voters are very dangerous, because they leave room for bogus voters,” Dr Quraishi said. He explained how keeping photo records of voters not only made voters lists more accurate but also stopped people from voting multiple times.
However, he said that civil society organisations must participate in the process and assist the government to maintain accurate electoral rolls.

In Manipur, the number of voters has gone down because the EC now uses face recognition software to identify voters, which kept bogus voters at bay. In the recently concluded polls, Dr Quraishi hinted that re-polling may occur in some booths were proxy-voting had been reported.

However, the Chief Election Commissioner also said that people should come out and vote, because absent voters often leave ground for bogus voters. “When you do not vote, the turnout is less; this makes it easier for criminal voters to win. They then deploy their agents who vote in the place of these absentee voters,” Dr Quraishi said. Indeed, if one eliminates the bogus voters from the list, the voter turnout is not too bad in India.

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COMMENTS

Nagesh Kini FCA

5 years ago

In response to a news item about the Maharashtra Govt. circular to Co-op Housing Societies, we did approach the providing 4 deaths and moving out in a society of just 16 flats well in time before the 2012 Mumbai civic polls. They didn't accept our application and insisted that their inspectors would verify. This hasn't happened.
The BLOs need to interact with local NGOs, ALMs,RWA who have a local feel and free access.

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