Spending
Driving too slow, Indian tourists lose car rentals
Two Indian tourists in New Zealand had their car rental contracts cancelled after they were stopped by police for driving too slow, media reported on Thursday.
 
The drivers drove their two rented vehicles at 60 km/h in a 100 km/h zone in South Island's Queenstown area and stopped frequently in the middle of the road, leading to several people reporting them to the police, Stuff online reported. 
 
In their defence, the Indian drivers blamed low visibility due to fog and geo-positioning system (GPS) problems. 
 
"They just had no idea. There was a real lack of understanding of our road rules," a police official said.
 
International car rental company Avis, provider of their cars, cancelled both the contracts. 

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An app to make residential societies 'smarter'
ApartmentAdda promises to ease the stress of managing a modern housing society
 
Now a software and an app can help both residents and their housing societies to keep track of basic functions like security, plumbing, power maintenance, tracking visitors, legal paperwork and even online voting for elections.
 
That's what ApartmentAdda promises - easing the stress of managing a modern housing society.
 
Founded in 2009 by engineer-duo Sangeeta Banerjee and husband Venkat Kandaswamy, both of whom have experience in ERP consultancy and web solutions, the company by the same name services some 7,500 societies across India.
 
"ApartmentAdda has an online directory of all residents and any information that is sought to be kept confidential can be masked. Homemakers can find a list of common service providers in the area with a rating of the quality of service of each vendor," Sangeeta Banerjee said.
 
"For particularly sticky issues of a society, anonymous polls are also possible," she said.
 
Besides, the app manages a host of services like member accounts, income and expense statements, while also offering billing, and online payment gateway. Residents can also schedule messages for delivery at a later date. Housed on an Android OS platform, it also aids visitor-tracking.
 
The company, which has nearly 60 employees, earns its revenues based on subscriptions from housing societies in cities like Gurgaon, Pune, Bengaluru, Mumbai and Kolkata.
 
"The best part about this app is that it is available free to download and can also run offline. The data is synchronised and can also be saved in an excel sheet for future reference. Staff at an apartment complex can also be tracked with this app," Banerjee said.
 
When asked about the company's growth, she said: "We have grown three times in the last financial year and we expect to grow five times in 2015-16. For our expansion, we are now looking at series 'A' funding from investors."

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Eating healthy: Why 'do' is better than 'don't'
The findings showed that focusing on 'Do' is better than on 'Don't'
 
If you want to inculcate healthy eating habits in your child, tell him what he 'can' eat rather than telling him what he 'can't', advises a new study.
 
"Telling your child to eat an apple so they stay healthy will work better than telling them not to eat the cookie because it will make them fat. "Don't" messages don't work for most of us," researchers at Cornell University said.
 
The findings showed that focusing on 'Do' is better than on 'Don't'. That is, stressing the benefits of eating healthy foods is more effective than warning against the harm of eating unhealthy foods.
 
"If you're a parent, it's better to focus on the benefits of broccoli and not the harm of hamburgers," said lead author Brian Wansink, director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab.
 
The researchers analysed 43 published international studies that involved either negative or positive nutrition messages.
 
They found that while negative messages tended to work best with experts - like dieticians and physicians - who were highly involved and knowledgeable in the area, most people who did not know a lot about nutrition would rather be told what they should eat and why it is good for them.
 
The researchers recommended that when designing public health messaging campaigns, focus on positive consequences of target healthy behaviours rather than focusing on the negative consequences.

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COMMENTS

Narendra Doshi

2 years ago

well said.

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