Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Don't rush to judgement, these four true tales teach us (The Funny Side)
A couple of years ago, a friend accused me of being really slow on the uptake, so I called him last night. "Yep," I said.
 
One should always take time over important issues instead of rushing to judgement.
 
Case in point: A recent news report says police were shocked to see the driver of a forklift truck use her vehicle's pointy bits to pick up and move a van that someone had parked in front of her house.
 
It was a cheeky, dangerous act, so police detained the driver and then set out to trace the van owner. It turned out to be the forklift driver.
 
"Villain and victim were the same person," said reader Sarath Malhotra, who forwarded me the link to the news story from the US state of Wyoming.
 
Police realised they now lacked a victim to file a complaint and so had to prosecute the motorist for Wearing Flipflops While Operating a Forklift, which is apparently an actual offence. (It is clear to me that law-makers worldwide work in three separate divisions: Criminal Law, Civil Legislation and Silly Laws, the third group being by far the most prolific.)
 
Anyway, the tale presaged the arrival in my inbox of a rash of news reports with unexpected twists.
 
An email from a regular contributor reported a recent incident in the UK town of Wiltshire. A woman saw a man with some sort of long-bladed weapon lurking menacingly in a quiet street. She called police and nine squad cars full of officers turned up -- to find a man trimming a hedge. The conversation went something like this. "What are you doing?" "Trimming my hedge, then having a cup of tea and a nap." "No mass murders or terrorist activities?" "I don't think so but I'll check my diary."
 
Next came a news item from the Washington Post. An old, homeless bag lady had long the habit of making deranged-sounding claims that the government owed her $100,000. Eventually a kindly social worker took the trouble to read through the paperwork in one of the woman's bags -- and discovered that the government owed the woman, 80-year-old Wanda Witter, $100,000. Be nice to homeless people, who may well have more disposable income than we do.
 
The fourth tale-with-a-twist came from a reader who collects "dumb criminal" reports. In California, a fugitive female, 29, found a pair of handcuffs at a friend's house and made a snap decision to try them on. Click! Now where's the key? No key! Unable to remove them, she called the police for help. They turned up at the house and were delighted to find a woman they had been looking for, pre-cuffed and ready to go. This was kind of like a Christmas present for police detectives, who usually have to do all their own detecting and handcuffing.
 
So there we go. Don't make rush decisions.
 
Yet there are exceptions. I told my children that I will love them unconditionally whatever they do, even if they rob banks or start wars, but if they ever use the words "cray-cray", "whatevs" or "swag" I kick them out and change the locks right now. That's reasonable, right?
 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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N Chandrasekaran, Tata Sons Chairman-designate, says he is humbled and honoured
On his appointment as the Chairman of Tata Sons, N Chandrasekaran said:
 
“I am humbled and honoured to be chosen to lead a truly great institution that occupies a unique position in the hearts of people in India and the world. I am proud to have been part of the Tata family for over 30 years and assuming this position is a great privilege."
 
He added, “I want to thank the Tata Sons Board and Ratan N. Tata for their confidence in me to lead this trusted institution that has a rich heritage."
 
Looking forward into the future, he remarked, “At the Tata group, we are at an inflection point. I am aware that this role comes with huge responsibilities. It will be my endeavour to help progress the group with the ethos, ethics and values that the Tata group has been built on.”
 

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Samsung heir's marathon questioning ends
Samsung heir Lee Jae-yong, returned home on Friday after facing marathon questioning by prosecutors all night about his possible involvement in a corruption scandal that led to the impeachment of former South Korean President Park Geun-hye.
 
Lee was called to testify on Thursday over suspicions that the country's largest family-run conglomerate gave financial support to Choi Soon-sil, Efe news reported.
 
Choi nicknamed the "female Rasputin" is being considered the apparent brain behind the plot involving business favours using her close relationship with Park.
 
The prosecution believes that the Samsung group signed a contract worth $18.6 million with a company based in Germany owned by Choi and also provided financial support for the equestrian training of her 20-year-old daughter.
 
Samsung also donated $17.3 million to two non-profit foundations operated by Choi. 
 
However, the Samsung chief insisted that they thought the money was given for good causes such as promoting local culture abroad and the sports sector.
 
It was suspected that the contract was being signed in exchange for support from the National Pension Service for a major merger agreement between Samsung's subsidiaries in 2015.
 
Samsung admitted the donations but denied that they had been made to secure return favours in the merger process.
 
The prosecutor, however, has not yet decided whether or not to detain Lee, something that could be a blow to Samsung.
 
Lee Jae-yong took over the reins of the Samsung conglomerate after his father Lee Kun-hee in May 2014 suffered a heart attack, which still keeps him hospitalised and speechless.
 
The "female Rasputin" case sparked outrage in South Korea and led to Park's impeachment in December 2016. Park is now waiting for the South Korean constitutional court to decide whether the impeachment vote is valid.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  

 

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