Domino's: Nice ad, but the promise is unsafe!

An ode to the unsung, thankless delivery boy warms the heart. But there is a problem on the rash riding the Domino’s boys have to do to deliver the pizza within the tight deadline

I quite like Domino's new commercial. Instead of harping on the pizza, its mouth-watering taste, the crisp bread crust, the delightful toppings, etc, they have created an emotional ad film which is based on their tireless delivery boys. It makes sense to me. The pizza lover is already a convert, so no point preaching to her/him. Strategically, it's better to interestingly promise a 30-minute delivery deadline, wherever you may be located.

The commercial is narrated by a little girl who eagerly awaits the delivery of her pizza, as she recounts the trials and tribulations a Domino's delivery boy faces, as he races to his destination to deliver the all-important pizza. Visually, of course, we get to watch the chap in action on his bike, as he surmounts all the assorted city obstacles. Heavy rains, deadly potholes, tyre punctures, raging morchas, bad traffic jams, ambiguous delivery addresses, rude reception from building security guards, etc, etc. And yes, despite all these problems he makes it on time, and smilingly too, much to the little girl's joy. By the way, speaking on a personal front, when I order from Domino's—which is not very often as they are quite expensive these days—I secretly wish the boy arrives a minute later. As that entitles me to a free pizza. But sadly, they always make it on time!

Yes, the ad works for me. An ode to the unsung, thankless delivery boy warms the heart. Most often these guys don't get tipped, because people anyway pay a huge sum for the pizza. And balk at having to shell out more. In addition, the delivery boy's story highlights Domino's 30-minute promise, which is the brand's USP. So all very well.

However, there's a problem, a big one: I am not in favour of the rash riding the Domino's boys have to do to deliver the pizza within the tight deadline. They put their own lives, as well as the lives of other road users, on the line. No pizza is worth a tragedy. Better that the goodies arrived a bit late than to result in an accident. 'Khushiyon ki home delivery' can so easily become barbaadiyon ki home delivery. So while the ad is all nice and sweet, the Domino's bosses need to re-examine their core promise.

User

COMMENTS

Subbu

6 years ago

It is very unfair to put the lives of the delivery boys on the line just for a commercial brownie point. When it takes 30 minutes minimum to make one pizza at home, I am sure we can wait an extra few minutes to get it door delivered.

Anurag Garg

6 years ago

The promise to give pizza free in case of delay does not really work in real life. I have been told by the pizza delivery boy on one such occassion that they have to shell out cost of pizza from their own pocket in case of delay. I don't know whether it is true or not (worth investigating for you), but you wouldn't have heart to withold the payment after hearing this. If it is true, then the ad really becomes farcical as the poor delivery boy has to take the hit for any contingency that he faces on the road and Dominos cares a damn about that.

Hemant V Bhatia

6 years ago

Is there any legal way to stop this practice of company.As they have no right on life of others on the road & even their own workers.

Indian stocks to open on a cautious note: Tuesday Market Preview

Asian markets are drifting on their own strength in the absence of any cues from the US

With Wall Street closed on Monday for the Independence Day holiday and markets in Asia trading mostly lower in early trade today, the domestic market is likely to open sideways. European markets closed mixed overnight but with the easing of the Greek debt imbroglio, attention will be drawn to the European Central Bank’s meeting where it will decide on a hike in key rates. The SGX Nifty, which opened positive, fell 1.50 points to 5,664 compared to its previous close of 5,665.50.

Signs of steady growth in the global economy, following a robust rise in US manufacturing in June, helped the Asian markets open higher yesterday. This positive effect rubbed on the Indian bourses, as well. However, the lack of any major triggers resulted in the market paring a major part of the day's gains and closing with modest gains.

Earlier, the Nifty was 53 points higher at the opening at 5,680 and the Sensex gained 133 points. Oil & gas, banking, auto and metal counters witnessed good buying activity in early trade. Investors resorted to profit booking at higher levels resulting in the market falling to the day's low in mid-morning trade. At the intra-day low, the Nifty fell to 5,633 and the Sensex to 18,782. However, the support of the broader indices kept the market in the green. The market was range-bound till the end of the session in the absence of any major triggers. The Nifty gained 23 points to close at 5,651 and the Sensex closed trade at 18,814, up 52 points from its previous close.

The Nifty traded well above its support of 5,475 during the entire session. A range-bound movement is expected till the Nifty touches 5,690. A close above 5,700 would signal a fresh rally.

Markets in Asia were mostly lower in early trade on Tuesday in the absence of any support from its US counterparts that were closed for the Independence Day holiday. With the regional bourses up for five days in a row, a bit of consolidation has set in.

The Shanghai Composite fell 0.16%, the Hang Seng, the Jakarta Composite and the Taiwan Weighted declined 0.17% each, the KLSE Composite shed 0.01%, the Nikkei 225 was down 0.15% and the Straits Times tanked 0.76%. Bucking the trend, the Seoul Composite gained 0.05% in early trade.

Back home, amid difficulties faced by Indian companies to repay loans taken under foreign currency convertible bonds (FCCBs), the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) on Monday allowed refinancing for its redemption by allowing firms to raise fresh overseas borrowing under the automatic route.

The RBI has decided to allow the Indian companies to refinance or restructure the outstanding FCCBs issued by them. It, however, said the amount of fresh ECB/FCCB should not exceed the outstanding redemption value at maturity of the outstanding FCCBs.

User

Maharashtra issues notification for refund of court fees on withdrawal of cheque-bouncing case

If a complainant withdraws the case under section 138 of the Negotiable Instruments Act, before the charges are framed, he could get a refund of up to 50% of the court fees paid

If you plan to withdraw a cheque-bounce case in court before charges are framed, you may also receive about 50% of the court fees as refund. This move would not only benefit individuals, but also financial institutions who file such cases, then opt for out-of-court settlement.

The Maharashtra government announced in a gazette notification in May that a claim for refund of court fees can be made after the withdrawal of the complaints for the cases, which are filed under section 138 of the Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881.

In India, the Negotiable Instruments Act regulates commercial transactions which take place through cheques, promissory notes and bills of exchange.

According to the Maharashtra government resolution (GR), the state government, in exercise of its powers conferred by section 43(2) of the Bombay Court Fees Act, 1959 will provide part of the court fees paid by the complainant under article 18 of schedule I, appended to the Act. Such refund will be paid to the complainant under two broad circumstances and conditions.

First, under section 138 of the Negotiable Instruments Act, 1881, a refund of 50% of the total court fees will be made when the complainant withdraws a complaint, or when the offence was compounded, before framing of particulars/charges, provided the claim is made within one year from the date of withdrawal of the complaint.

Similarly, 25% of the court fee will be refunded provided the complaint is withdrawn, or the offence is compounded, after farming of particulars/charges, or any subsequent stages of the complaint. Here again, a claim has to be made within a year.

User

COMMENTS

sanjay khatnani

6 years ago

READ

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)