Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Do not blindly follow mobile health applications, warn doctors

They said that a lot of times the applications suggest wrong diet to the user, without knowing the metabolism of the users body, resulting in serous health complication

 

In view of increase in usage of mobile based health applications, Indian doctors have urged people to not blindly rely on such technologies for health updates as they may give wrong estimates.
 
They said that a lot of times the applications suggest wrong diet to the user, without knowing the metabolism of the users body, resulting in serous health complications.
 
"A lot of of applications are not to be relied upon and exist just to generate revenue in the market. There are health applications which claim to measure blood pressure by simply keeping thumb on the screen. Such techniques are misleading," said Pradeep Gadge, a leading diabeteologist.
 
Citing an example, he said that the blood pressure result after measuring through health applications are always different from manually measuring it.
 
"There are situations when health application users rely on it for the calories burn during the entire day along with several other things, without even realising that such applications are pre set and do not show the actual results," said Gadge. 
 
According to doctors, there are an estimated 50,000 medical applications presently in the market and this is expected to grow. Currently, 500 million people worldwide are using health applications for health updates.
 
Sudhir Kumar, a Delhi-based diabeteologist, said: "People want instant results and further they follow their own methods to loose extra kilos through apps or some methods rather than going for the natural way or the way suggested by the doctors.
 
"Despite the popularity and promise of these apps, I'm skeptical about most of these. People need to understand that health guidelines for people vary."
 
He said that a recent survey also had revealed that various health applications had diagnosed several types of diseases to its users, but when they consulted the doctor further they were found to not be suffering from any diseases.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article
 

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Do genes control intolerance and anti-social behaviour?

Many studies in the past have linked genes with offensive bevaviour, but the results have often been inconsistent. A recent study by researchers in Montreal, Canada, though, found that genetics may indeed play a key role in violent behaviour

 

As Indian society grapples with the issue of intolerance and violence, genetic experts are opening up the hoary discussion on whether genetic makeup can predispose people towards anti-social behaviour.
 
We are back to the debate on nature versus nurture.
 
The answer may not be easy to find, but some experts say that the monoamine oxidase A or MAOA gene -- involved in the regulation of emotions and behaviour -- can predispose certain humans towards anti-social behaviour, if they have had adverse childhood experiences.
 
Many studies in the past have linked genes with offensive bevaviour, but the results have often been inconsistent. A recent study by researchers in Montreal, Canada, though, found that genetics may indeed play a key role in violent behaviour.
 
The team from Universite de Montreal found that certain polymorphism (change of form) of MAOA gene may disrupt the regulation of emotions and behavioural inhibition in the brain.
 
"The study found that men with a less frequent variant of the MAOA gene (approximately 30% of them) were at a higher risk of exhibiting anti-social behaviour in adolescence and in early adulthood compared to those without this variant, but who also have been exposed to violence as children," informs Dr Manish Jain, senior consultant (psychiatrist) from BLK Super Speciality Hospital in the capital.
 
"It implies that even when exposed to the same environment some may develop anti-social traits based on their genetics while others may not," Dr Jain told IANS.
 
According to Dr Sameer Malhotra, director (mental health and behavioural sciences) at Max Super Specialty Hospital, personality profile of an individual is influenced by both genes and environment he lives in.
 
So are we any nearer to a clear-cut answer?
 
"Through genes one inherits vulnerability factor. Environmental factors in conjunction with the vulnerability can influence behaviour. Anti-social behaviour is linked to conduct disorder in childhood. At times, association with family history of alcoholism or drug abuse and aggression are also observed," Dr Malhotra said.
 
"High levels of neurotransmitter dopamine that is involved in the regulation of emotions and problems in the frontal brain cortex are also reported in such people," he adds.
 
Other experts feel that people who are victims themselves or have witnessed violence in childhood are more likely to have anti-social tendencies as teenagers and adults.
 
"The impact on personality would depend on overall environment and positive experiences and the resolution of past experiences, but statically, this statement would be correct that there would be more chances of aggressive tendencies in the absence of support and intervention," explains Dr Samir Parikh, director, department of mental health and behavioral sciences, Fortis Healthcare.
 
"There are many social psychological factors which have a significant impact and to say what percentage would be genes would still need more research though," he adds.
 
Recently, a criminologist Dr JC Barnes from University of Texas at Dallas found that genes can be a strong predictor of whether someone strays into a life of crime.
 
The research focussed on whether genes are likely to cause a person to become a life-course persistent offender, which is characterised by anti-social behaviour during childhood that may later progress to violent or serious criminal acts.
 
"The overarching conclusions were that genetic influences in life-course persistent offending were larger than environmental influences," says Dr Barnes.
 
There is no specific gene for criminal behaviour as crime is a learned behaviour. "But there are likely to be hundreds, if not thousands, of genes that will incrementally increase your likelihood of being involved in a crime even if it only ratchets that probability by 1%," he points out. "It still is a genetic effect. And it's still important."
 
Although research has not concluded genetic basis for delinquent tendencies, the influence of genetics and environment combined cannot be ignored.
 
"The child's initial behaviours and learning are moulded through parenting and family interaction. The temperament with which the child is born along with parenting behaviour styles influence one another," explains Dr Shobhana Mittal, consultant psychiatrist at Cosmos Institute of Mental Health abd Behavioural Sciences in New Delhi.
 
Children from broken homes, single parents or from families where there is substance abuse, physical, verbal, emotional or sexual abuse tend to have poor family bonding. Disrupted family atmospheres affect the overall emotional health of the child as well as contribute to the child's personality and coping abilities.
 
"With immature coping skills, children at times do not understand how to manage anger, frustration resulting in anger outbursts or aggressive behaviour. This further makes the child vulnerable to external influence from their peers," elaborates Dr Sunil Mittal, director at Cosmos Institute of Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences (CIMBS), in New Delhi.
 
"A recent genetic analysis of almost 900 offenders in Finland revealed two genes associated with violent repeat offenders were the MAOA gene and a variant of cadherin 13 (CDH13) gene. Those with these genes were 13 times more likely to have a history of repeated violent behaviour," Dr Jain told IANS.
 
Although the role of genes cannot be overlooked any more, the jury may still be out on a definite answer.
 
But as the experts point out, if a lethal gene is lurking there somewhere, it may make a person a little more prone to act out the bad experiences in life.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article
 
 

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COMMENTS

Meenal Mamdani

12 months ago

I am happy to see that the article does not put the blame solely on genes. Such an interpretation would have harmed kids, saying basically that they are beyond redemption as their genes cannot be changed and therefore their behavior too is unchangeable.

Such a false interpretation would also have harmed adoption. One already sees a lot of prejudice in society with people saying that one should not adopt when the parents are unknown as one does not know what bad traits the child carries.

Fortunately genes are only part of the answer and environment which is far more malleable can be improved to effect better outcomes.

Sahara pays tax dues, Aamby Valley 'unsealed' after five hours

The company also subsequently circulated the latest photos and videos of unrestricted entry-exit at its prestigious project near Lonavala hillstation in Pune district this evening

 

Barely five hours after the Maharashtra government sealed the Sahara India Pariwar's flagship Aamby Valley Resort for non-payment of tax, the company paid up the outstanding non-agriculture tax dues and the seal was broken here on Tuesday afternoon.
 
The company also termed as "illegal and high-handed approach" the sudden move to seal and close the resort's gates by the revenue department officials earlier this morning.
 
In a statement, the Sahara Group also contested the state government's claims of outstanding dues of around Rs.4.50 crore and said it has already paid up Rs.4.25 crore for the past two financial years, with a small outstanding of Rs.27,27,740 left.
 
For the current fiscal (2015-2016), it said that the outstanding amount was only Rs.2,26,13,870 for which it had 30 days time (till March 31).
 
However, at the insistence of the revenue department officials who sealed the project main gate and its administrative offices, Sahara Group made the full outstanding payments (Rs.2,53,41,610) by cheque on Tuesday itself.
 
The company also subsequently circulated the latest photos and videos of unrestricted entry-exit at its prestigious project near Lonavala hillstation in Pune district this evening.
 
Earlier, a team of officials swooped on the township to seal the property's main gates and its administrative sections, but the back entrance was kept open for the staffers and residents.
 
The officials also served a notice to the resort authorities to clear the alleged two-year old dues by March-end, failing which the government would initiate legal proceedings.
 
Aamby Valley, labelled a hill city paradise for the rich and famous, is spread across around 4,300 hectares of lush green hills with a large natural lake and three artificial lakes on the property in Pune district.
 
Constructed in 2003, it boasts of a private airstrip, an 18-hole golf course, premium chateaus, villas and bungalows, shopping plazas, boating and a good all-year round weather.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article
 
 

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