Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Discussing religion improves health
Discussion on religion and spirituality can often lead to improved physical and mental health, but clinical social workers are not integrating these conversations into their counselling sessions, a study says.
 
Licensed clinical social workers (LCSWs) account for the largest number of clinically trained helping professionals in the US.
 
"It's that big elephant in the room. If we ignore it, we are ignoring a huge component of their lives that may be tied to the clinical issue," said Holly Oxhandler from Baylor University.
 
Oxhandler and colleagues surveyed 442 LCSWs across the US for the study, which was published in the journal Social Work.
 
The survey revealed that the vast majority of LCSWs, with more than 80 percent responding favourably on most of the survey items, have positive attitudes regarding the integration of their clients' religion and spirituality into their discussions.
 
"They are confident in their abilities to assess and discuss their clients' beliefs, and find it feasible to do so. But they are not doing it... I'm still boggled by the fact that they are so disconnected between their views and their behaviours," she said.
 
Oxhandler said that from the 1920s to the 1970s, there was a push for what is called the "medical model" of practice, which she said had no mention of religion or spirituality because there was no research to support the discussion about clients' faith and practice during that time.
 
"It wasn't until the 1980s when some researchers were saying, 'Well, it's kind of an important area of their clients' culture that we need to be considering in clinical practice'."
 
It is important for social workers to be trained to learn about religions other than their own, she said adding: "If you're a Christian social worker working in a medical setting and you have a Muslim client who's in the hospital, how do you know that she needs to be positioned a certain way within her room when she prays five times a day?"

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COMMENTS

Mahesh S Bhatt

1 year ago

Sir Newton says Energy can never be created nor destroyed but it only gets transformed.So logically even after the death visible/measurable dead weight of the body multiplied by 9.8kg/cmsq gravitional pull creates an energy force which needs 4 persons to carry the body to crematorium.

Science is not matured to handle very pico/nano forms of emotional/psychological/spiritual enregies but we all experience it & like it hence use of right spirit of religion in right perspective under a divine Guru is God sent blessings which often cures us hence believe experience the divine.There are sciences like Astorlogy which accurately times /remedies the karmic doshas with cosmic cross/like vibrational energies from Mantra( Mann-Mind /Trartna-Protection),Yantra-Yan-technques /Trarana Protection) & finally Yantra ( Yan-Tools Trarana-Protection).Mail [email protected] for more information on Fusion of Science & Religion.I am an High Tech Software Engineer who uses Scientific religious theories for divine interventions for safety & healthy growth.

Goa taxi drivers up ante over digital meters, rent-a-car services
Several attempts by the state government over the last decade to install fare meters have failed, even as fights between taxi drivers and passengers over fare disputes are commonplace
 
Months after Goa's tourist taxi drivers threatened an agitation over installation of digital meters, the cabbie community in the state may now go off the roads over an increase in licences granted to rent-a-car operators.
 
What started with the government last month notifying draft rules making it mandatory for the 7,000-odd tourist taxis in Goa to install GPS-capable digital meters, has threatened to snowball into a major issue between tourist taxi drivers and rent-a-car operators.
 
"The rental cars are being let out illegally and because of which we do not get customers. Many of them have salaried jobs and are running the business," Vinayak Nanoskar, general secretary of the North Goa Tourist Taxi Owners Association, told IANS.
 
He did not rule out a strike as an option.
 
Many of Goa's tourist taxis and their drivers have often been accused of over-charging, intimidating and operating in an unregulated environment.
 
Several attempts by the state government over the last decade to install fare meters have failed, even as fights between taxi drivers and passengers over fare disputes are commonplace.
 
Some years back, a flare-up between a Russian travel operator and a local taxi owner resulted in the murder of the latter, sparking hostilities between locals and Russian tourists.
 
With taxi services unpredictable, unorganised and expensive, the formal introduction of rent-a-car services in Goa licenced by the state transport department caught on, especially for tourists, nearly three million of whom visit the state annually.
 
"It works for us. If one considers a weekend holiday in Goa, hiring a rent-a-car service saves you at least Rs.2,000 compared to taxis," says Ramesh Shah, a businessman from Mumbai and a regular visitor to Goa.
 
Ramdas Palkar, president of the North Goa Rent-a-Cab Associations, claims that renting out cars is as good and legitimate a business as any.
 
"We are sons of the soil as well and we too have stomachs to feed and loans to repay. Giving out cars on rent is one of the provisions of the central government's Motor Vehicle Act and Rules," Palkar said, arguing that the demand made by the tourist taxi operators to scrap their licences was bizarre.
 
Palkar said that due to pressure by the taxi operators, the transport department had already stopped giving permission for rent-a-car operations in north Goa, referring to an embargo on fresh rent-a-car permits imposed by the authorities last year.
 
"We are not asking that the government should allow everyone to start a rent-a-car business. Only those who were registered before the embargo on new licences, on permissions and renewals should be given," he added.
 
Assistant director of transport Uday Gauns said the arguments put forth by both sides were being looked into and that the impasse between the two warring sides would be resolved soon.
 
"We will ensure there is no strike. The dispute will be settled amicably," Gauns said.

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Dutch warning: Rs 322-crore/km, Mumbai highway may be a 'disaster'
On June 5, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte met with Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis and announced Dutch technical assistance for the 34.6-km-long road
 
At a public meeting convened by the Mumbai Waterfronts Centre (MWC) on June 24, the Dutch Consul in Mumbai, Arend Gouw, said that the city’s ambitious, expensive Rs.11,300-crore coastal road, if not planned properly, would “homogenise” the coast.
 
He then corrected this to “destroy”.
 
On June 5, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte met with Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis and announced Dutch technical assistance for the 34.6-km-long road - 53 years after it was first planned - to be built at a cost of Rs 322 crore per km, or only Rs. 28 crore per km less than Mumbai’s future Metro lines.
 
Although the consultants presented the detailed project report (DPR) on the road on Mumbai’s western seafront this February, the municipal corporation only made it public on June 24.
 
This was after Union Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar cleared the road, connecting Nariman Point in south Mumbai to Kandivali in the northern suburbs, on June 8, subject to two conditions:
 
One, to reclaim as little land for the project; such reclamation was halted in 1974 after protests by environmentalists.
 
Second, to retain the current building restrictions under the Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ). These prohibit construction within 500 metres of the high-tide line.
 
Since the road will be constructed some 100-200 metres off the coast, there was the danger that the high-tide line would have been pushed back by that much, permitting construction on some of India’s most expensive real estate.
 
Activists attended a meeting convened by the MWC on July 3 to list their objections to the project, originally mooted by Los Angeles-based planners in 1962.
 
The DPR reveals the lack of institutional support for a coherent mobility policy, according to Rishi Aggarwal from the Observer Research Foundation.
 
It also cites how due to the global economic downturn, Mumbai's population growth has slowed perceptibly. Between 2001 and 2011, the city only grew by 500,000 people.
 
It shows that the growth in car traffic will peak at 3 percent per annum between 2015 and 2019, slowing down to 0.3 percent between 2040 and 2043, an average of only 1.7 percent in these 28 years.
 
It estimated a maximum of 34,090 cars per day in 2014 through the existing Bandra-Worli Sea Link (BWSL), which was built in 2009 and will be connected to the road. This dropped to 11,378 cars at its southernmost section at Nariman Point.
 
In 2044, it estimated at most 61,749 cars a day at BWSL, dropping to 27,616 at Nariman Point.
 
Nariman Point and south Mumbai are losing their clout as the old central business district. They are ceding ground to the Bandra-Kurla Complex, where real estate prices are higher. Other centres have opened up in the suburbs too for IT and other industries.
 
Apart from the declining importance of Nariman Point, motorists are reluctant to pay Rs.60 one way or Rs.90 return and prefer to use the old inland route, which takes more time.
 
If one took the interest on the Rs.11,300 crores spent on the new road - which will go up when finally ready in three or more years - and added maintenance costs, the one-way toll from Kandivali to Nariman Point should be around Rs.400, according to an expert. Few people would pay this.
 
The alignment of the road is also questionable, according to Shweta Wagh, on the faculty of Kamala Raheja college. There will be an undersea 5-km-long tunnel from Nariman Point across the Marine Drive bay through Malabar Hill to Nepean Sea Road.
 
When Marine Drive already exists as a reclaimed road, why not align the road to follow its contours, asks Wagh.
 
At Dadar Prabhadevi beach, Dutch technology has been used to replenish the sandy beach and prevent further erosion. With the construction envisaged for the road, further damage to the coastal topography can’t be ruled out.
 
According to an earlier official report, 186 hectares will be reclaimed, but no buildings will be permitted on them.
 
This will obstruct the operations of fisherfolk, according to Rajesh Mangela of the Maharashtra Machimar Kruti Sangh. In the past, reclamation at Nariman Point and BWSL has similarly affected their livelihood.
 
Under the original scheme for the road, proposed by the architect Hafeez Contractor, there would have been an even 100-metre-wide entirely reclaimed swathe to serve as the highway. This would have privatised public space.
 
If the Metro is built into the road, it will increase reclamation “drastically”, according to an official who worked on the road. Officials have also mentioned creating parking areas along the road.
 
While the DPR route shows the road ending abruptly in Madh island, which will be connected to Greater Mumbai by a bridge, the narrow roads running through these northern villages will be widened even more than the coastal road. This will destroy the ambience of these areas, which serve as week-end getaways for Mumbaikars.
 
The DPR admits that the project will not be financially viable on a Build, Operate and Transfer basis. However, it does not specify how much it should charge as tolls to recover capital and recurring costs.  

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COMMENTS

Templeviewchs

1 year ago

This ambitious COASTAL ROAD project would be most unviable and would make INDIAN ROADS HOMOS....is in fact correct. No air will circulate to the MUMBAI CITY as all COASTS will be JAMMED with TRAFFIC AND BLDGS.

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