Citizens' Issues
December 16 gangrape 'juvenile' to be released: HC
The Delhi High Court on Friday said the December 16, 2012, Delhi gang-rape "juvenile" convict's stay can't be extended in an observation home.
 
A division bench of Chief Justice G. Rohini and Justice Jayant Nath said the convict, who was found to be a juvenile at the time of the crime, cannot be kept at the observation home beyond December 20, the date he was set to be released.
 
"There can't be any direction to extend the stay beyond December 20," said the bench.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Devils, Deals and the DEA
Why Chapo Guzman was the biggest winner in the DEA's longest running drug cartel case
 
 
For 14 months, the first thing Dave Herrod, a special agent with the Drug Enforcement Administration, did every morning was boot up his laptop and begin tracking a 43-foot yacht with Dock Holiday painted on the stern.
 
In the summer of 2005, the DEA had intercepted a conversation in which members of a Mexican drug cartel known as the Arellano Félix Organization discussed buying a yacht in California. Herrod and his colleagues studied the classified ads in yacht magazines and determined that the Dock Holiday was the boat the AFO members wanted. DEA agents then managed to get on board and install tracking devices before the sale went through. That’s when Herrod started watching the boat on his laptop.
 
Since the early 1990s, the Arellano brothers — the inspiration for the Obregón brothers in the movie Traffic — had controlled the flow of drugs through what was perhaps the single most important point for illicit commerce in the world: the border crossing from Tijuana to San Diego. Much of the AFO’s success derived from its predilection for innovative violence. The cartel employed a crew of “baseballistas” who would hang victims from rafters, like piñatas, and beat them to death with bats. Pozole, the Spanish word for a traditional Mexican stew, was the AFO’s euphemism for a method of hiding high-profile victims: Stuff them headfirst into a barrel of hot lye or acid and stir for 24 hours until only their teeth were left, then pour them down the drain.
 
Dismantling the AFO had been an official project of the U.S. government since 1992, and an obsession of Herrod’s since the year before that, when he’d started chasing the cartel as a rookie agent stationed near San Diego. A former athlete, he spent years guzzling Pepsi and Mountain Dew to power through long workdays. His health, like everything else, took a backseat to the AFO case.
 
After the sale of the Dock Holiday, the trackers showed the vessel hugging the coast of Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, rounding the tip of Cabo San Lucas, and heading north into the Gulf of California to La Paz. Once in a while, it sailed to Rancho Leonero, where Javier Arellano Félix, the head of the AFO at the time, had a beach house. Herrod knew that Javier loved deep-sea fishing, and he was convinced that the cartel’s chief executive was using the boat. So the DEA launched Operation Shadow Game. The plan: Watch the Dock Holiday to find out if Javier would be on it, then intercept the boat should it stray beyond Mexico’s territorial waters.
 
For six weeks, the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Monsoon stood sentinel off Baja California, waiting for the yacht to venture more than 12 nautical miles off the coast and into international waters. But it never did. On August 12, 2006, Operation Shadow Game came to an end. The Monsoon set off for other duties, and Herrod left his laptop dark for the first time since the previous summer.
 
Two days later, he got a call at 8 a.m. from the Florida-based Joint Interagency Task Force South, which was still monitoring the tracking devices. The Dock Holiday had left Mexican sovereignty south of Cabo San Lucas. The men on the boat were chasing marlin, zigzagging in and out of international waters: out to 19 miles, back to 10 miles, then out to 15, then back to 12. The task force wanted to know whether the Coast Guard should board the Dock Holiday if the opportunity arose.
 
Herrod had only a hunch as to who was on the boat. The DEA had deemed the operation an expensive failure and pulled its on-the-ground surveillance weeks earlier. Agents who had worked on the AFO case for years were being reassigned entirely. Herrod figured he’d never have another chance to catch Javier outside of Mexico. Without asking his supervisors, he gave the order: Send the Monsoon back.
 
At 1 p.m., 13.1 nautical miles off Mexico, the Coast Guard intercepted the Dock Holiday. Herrod waited at the office in San Diego, pacing back and forth, as the Coast Guard collected identification from those on board. Agents shuffled past his cubicle asking for updates, like restless children on a road trip. After two hours, he got a message from the Monsoon: eight men and three boys on board. At 4 p.m., photographs started coming through by e-mail. The first two faces, those of the captain and a crewman, were unfamiliar. So were the next two. Could he have been wrong? Then came the fifth picture, and it took Herrod’s breath away: a mustachioed man in a pale-yellow Lacoste shirt, reclining on white-leather seats. This was “El Nalgón,” or “Big Ass”: Manuel Arturo Villarreal Heredia, the 30-year-old chief enforcer for the AFO. According to agents, he was known for his facility with knife-based torture.
 
Herrod had never seen the young man in the sixth photo, though he had the Arellano family’s heavy eyebrows. Next came pictures of the three children and another unfamiliar man. In the final photo, staring wide-eyed into the camera, was a compact, square-jawed man wearing a thin gold chain that disappeared under the collar of his salmon-colored T-shirt. His pursed lips were framed by stubble and his eyebrows arched in subtle confusion. Herrod and an agent sitting beside him shot out of their chairs. The man was Javier… Continue Reading…
 

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From EDM to heavy metal: International music left India grooving
Skrillex, Afrojack, Slash, Michael Learns to Rock, Mogwai and Megadeth. The live music calendar for 2015 was long and diverse with a plethora of artists from across the globe, who mesmerised sold out crowds at gigs, festivals and events in India this year. Some of the best - David Guetta and Fatboy Slim - of course, are kept for the last!
 
With an unprecedented surge in international festivals and concerts, music aficionados got the chance to witness some of the world's biggest names from diverse genres like EDM (Electronic Dance Music), rock, jazz and heavy metal on the home turf in 2015. And there was also a surprise from Coldplay's Chris Martin!
 
EDM has definitely taken the cake, as far as music genres are concerned. Sunburn, India's premier electronic music festival, featured Grammy Award-winning DJ and music producer Afrojack at Sunburn Arena, and will host Guetta, Martin Garrix, KSHMR as headlining acts in Goa at the end of this month.
 
The idea is to bring new sounds and fresh projects to consumers every year, says Harindra Singh, vice chairman and managing director, Percept Ltd.
 
"Each year our consumer research, marketing and production team research the artists, new production experiences and consumer experiences to ensure that we give a truly global experience to our fans. We are in constant touch with the international artists and their agencies to experiment with new sounds and new projects and we bring to the country the absolute best," Singh told IANS.
 
He said that while "dance music is a well established concept worldwide, India is waking up to it only now and embracing it fully".
 
Even on the heavy metal front, an array of artists like Megadeth, Napalm Death, Demilich, Anatomia, Carcass, Inquisition, Hacktivist and Cannibal Corpse among others made their appearances in the country at different heavy metal festivals.
 
Kunal Choksi, owner of Mumbai-based heavy metal record label Transcending Obscurity, attributes this growth to "awareness and promotion".
 
"The fact is that organisers here are actually making an effort to get in touch with bands of their choice, and inviting them to play shows in the country. In the past, this remained a dream for most," Choksi told IANS.
 
Devraj Sanyal, managing director and CEO, Universal Music Group South Asia, says the surge of international acts touring India has a lot to do with internet exposure to such bands.
 
"Our audiences are now exposed to music all over the globe at the very same time as it's launched out there. Secondly, unlike earlier, clubs and hangout spots in metros now play international music much more than they ever used to," Sanyal told IANS.
 
Post-rock too got a boost with bands like Mogwai and Explosions in the Sky performing for packed audiences this year.
 
"It is amazing for both of us to be here in such a short span of time. I think this shows that the kind of music Mogwai, us and a couple of other bands from Japan have been playing holds great interest and people are excited to see and hear this kind of music," Explosions in the Sky's guitarist Munaf Rayani told IANS.
 
Jaideep Singh, senior vice president and business head, LIVE Viacom18, credits "startup entrepreneurs" and "entry of big organised corporate players" for the growth of international music, especially dance music, in India.
 
"Initial five years were more of sporadic events happening across the country in a few major cities which set the bed rock of the explosive growth witnessed in the last few years," Singh told IANS.
 
However, Sandesh Shenoy, organiser of Bangalore's Trendslaughter Fest and owner of Cyclopean Eye Records, believes that there is still quite some work left to be done in the extreme metal sphere.
 
"Even though we have seen a surge in the 'popularity' of extreme metal in the recent years, the genre still largely remains underground. Barring a few commercial metal acts like Cannibal Corpse for example, extreme metal seems to have a rather limited and diminishing audience," Shenoy told IANS.
 
In a nutshell:
 
* Overall, a very positive year for international music in India.
 
* A lot of big artists from across genres performed this year, with special mention to Chris Martin from Coldplay, who gave an impromptu performance in Delhi.
 
* Music festivals got a big boost with great crowds. The Skrillex show in Gurgaon, for example, reportedly had around 10,000 people dancing to the DJ's tunes.
 
* Heavy metal music got a great boost with the advent of music festivals like BIG69, CultFest, Trendslaughter Fest and Bangalore Open Air, which brought several big names from the global metal movement to India for the first time.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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