Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Deccan Chargers, the winner of second IPL T20, is no more
Now that BCCI is free to go ahead with the termination of Deccan Chargers, the fate of its proposed sale to Kamla Landmarc is uncertain. It is also unclear how players of Deccan Chargers would get their payments
 
Mumbai: Debt-ridden Deccan Chargers can no longer be a part of the Indian Premier League (IPL) after its beleaguered owners failed to produce a Rs100-crore bank guarantee before the Bombay High Court, a condition that had been set for the struggling team's survival in the League, reports PTI.
 
Deccan Chargers' failure to furnish the guarantee money before the 5pm deadline on Friday effectively means that the BCCI's termination of the team stands and the Board was now free to float the tender for a new franchise.
 
Deccan Chronicle Holdings Ltd, the owner of the franchise, had sought an extension to the deadline until 15th October to submit an 'irrevocable and unconditional' bank guarantee but the High Court refused to grant further time.
 
Justice SJ Kathawala declined to give them more time, saying the earlier deadline of 9th October had been extended by three days to accommodate them.
 
A top BCCI official said that the IPL Governing Council had earlier decided to terminate Deccan Chargers' contract with IPL and that decision stands.
 
"We had decided to terminate the contract of Deccan Chargers. It was a decision taken by the IPL Governing Council and only that body can change it. So as things stand, their contract is terminated," the official said.
 
The court had on 1st October asked DCHL to give the bank guarantee which would be in force for a period of one year.
 
The BCCI had last month taken the decision to terminate the contract after an emergency IPL Governing Council meeting in Chennai. The DCHL had moved the Bombay High Court challenging the termination.
 
The court had at an earlier hearing ordered DCHL to bear all expenses for IPL 6 including making payments to BCCI towards franchise, players and support team costs. Besides, it was asked to bear the costs of conducting matches and other expenses. 
 
In the event of any default on part of DCHL, BCCI shall be entitled to invoke the bank guarantee to the extent necessary, Justice Kathawala had said.
 
The court had on 26th September appointed retired Supreme Court judge CK Thakkar as arbitrator to resolve within three months the dispute between BCCI and DCHL over the termination of Deccan Chargers franchise.
 
However, pending arbitration proceedings and making up of an award by the arbitrator, the judge asked the BCCI not to act on the termination of the franchise agreement for a period of seven days, if the award is in their favour.
 
The judge had, however, clarified that the 26th September order would immediately cease to be in force if DCHL fails to furnish the bank guarantee.
 
The development comes on a day when the DCHL informed the Bombay Stock Exchange about its decision to sell the IPL franchise to a Mumbai-based real estate firm Kamla Landmarc Real Estate Holdings Ltd for an undisclosed sum.
 
"Pursuant to its meeting of the board of directors held on 11th October, it was resolved to authorise the board of directors to sell, transfer or dispose of the Deccan Chargers Franchise business undertaking, business division of the company to Kamla Landmarc Real Estate Holdings Pvt Ltd," DCHL said in a filing to the BSE.
 
Now that the Cricket Board is free to go ahead with the termination of the franchise, the fate of the proposed sale is uncertain. It is also unclear how the players of the Deccan Chargers would get their payments.
 
Deccan Chargers was hoping to resolve its financial problems by selling the team but it rejected the sole bid it received at the auction in Chennai on 13th September.
 
PVP Ventures Ltd, the Hyderabad-based urban infrastructure and film production company, had offered Rs900 crores but Deccan rejected it finding the terms of payment and the amount unacceptable.
 
DCHL purchased the Hyderabad franchise for Rs428 crore in 2008. At the auction, the base price was said to be around Rs50 crore. The winning bidder had to meet BCCI's eligibility criteria and other requirements.
 

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The best reporting on Facebook and your privacy

With Facebook passing the one-billion user mark, ProPublica have rounded up the best reads on the company and privacy issues

 
Facebook hit the one-billion user mark last week, a little more than two years after it reached 500 million users. To mark the occasion, we've rounded up some of the best reads on Facebook and privacy.
 
Facebook Raises Fears With Ad Tracking, The Financial Times, September 2012
Facebook has been working with a company called Datalogix to track how often people who see ads for a given product on Facebook end up buying it in real-world stores. Datalogix does this by matching up the email addresses tied to users' Facebook accounts with troves of email addresses and other data it has purchased, much of which comes from customer loyalty cards and other programs. The company has data on 70 million American households from more than 1,000 retailers, including drug stores and grocers.
 
Facebook Sells More Access to Members, The Wall Street Journal, October 2012 
In addition to its work with Datalogix, Facebook has started letting advertisers target users based on their email addresses, their phone numbers and the other websites they've been visiting. Gokul Rajaram, who oversees Facebook's ad products, said the changes were made "in a way that respects user privacy."
 
Last week, a Polish startup called KILLSWITCH.me posted a video to the website Hacker News that seemed to show that including link to a website — say, Mashable — in a private message to another Facebook user would include the "Like" counter on Mashable's website. Facebook confirmed to The Next Web that it was doing this, though it said it was not revealing any of users' private information.
 
When Robert Collins applied for a job with the Maryland Department of Corrections, the organization required him to give them his Facebook password. The Department of Corrections backed down after the American Civil Liberties Union sent a letter calling the practice "a frightening and illegal invasion of privacy," but it hasn't stopped elsewhere. California became the latest state to ban it last month.
 
Why Facebook Is After Your Kids, The New York Times Magazine, October 2011 
The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act, which bars websites from gathering data about children under 13, means that 12-year-olds can't legally use Facebook. Mark Zuckerberg wants to change that. "That will be a fight we take on at some point," he said. He may not be successful. The Federal Trade Commission pushed new rules last month to make it harder for companies to track children online.
 
Germans Reopen Investigation on Facebook Privacy, The New York Times, August 2012 
In August, the German data protection commissioner in Hamburg — yes, the Germans have a data protection commissioner — reopened an investigation into Facebook's huge database of human faces culled from users' photos. (Johannes Caspar, the commissioner, had suspended the inquiry in June but reopened it when Facebook failed to cooperate.) The database is a component of facial-recognition technology that allows Facebook to automatically detect users' friends' faces in the photos they upload to Facebook. The company has since agreed to get rid of it for users who live in the European Union.
 
The Face of Facebook, The New Yorker, September 2010 
Jose Antonio Vargas's profile of Zuckerberg details some of his views on privacy, which the Facebook founder calls a "third-rail issue" online. "A lot of people who are worried about privacy and those kinds of issues will take any minor misstep we take and turn it into as big a deal as possible," he said.
 
Facebook is now required to respect users' privacy and undergo regular privacy audits for two decades, thanks to a settlement between the Federal Trade Commission and the social network last November. It also requires that Facebook pay $16,000 a day for each violation of the agreement. In a blog post the day the settlement was announced, Zuckerberg apologized for making "a bunch of mistakes" on privacy issues, including its now-defunct Beacon advertising platform and a number of changes made in 2009.
 
Facebook to Target Ads Based on App Usage, The Wall Street Journal, July 2012 
Facebook is also taking steps to track users on mobile devices, likely the next frontier for online privacy. "The social network is tracking the apps that people use through its popular Facebook Connect feature," the Journal reports, "which lets users log in to millions of websites and apps as varied as Amazon.com, LinkedIn and Yelp with their Facebook identity." Facebook uses that data to help target ads. When the Journal's story ran in July, the company was also considering tracking what people do on the apps. (We reached out to Facebook to see what the decided, but they did not respond to requests for comment.)
 
 

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Days of Gold And Sepia: A Slice of History

Yasmeen Premji’s debut novel chronicles an important period of Indian business

 
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