Nation
Countdown to election: Government sets up 7th pay commission

The setting up of pay commission once again comes ahead of the assembly elections in five states in November and the general elections next year

Ahead of general elections, the Indian government on Wednesday announced constitution of the Seventh Pay Commission, which will look into increasing salaries, allowances and pensions of about 80 lakh of its employees and pensioners.

 

In a statement, finance minister P Chidambaram, said, "Prime Minister Manmohan Singh approved the constitution of the 7th Pay Commission. Its recommendations are likely to be implemented with effect from 1 January 2016".

 

The setting up of the Commission, whose recommendations will benefit about 50 lakh central government employees, including those in defence and railways, and about 30 lakh pensioners, comes ahead of the Assembly elections in five states in November and the general elections next year.

 

The government constitutes Pay Commission almost every 10 years to revise the pay scales of its employees and often these are adopted by states after some modification.

 

As the Commission takes about two years to prepare its recommendations, the award of the seventh pay panel is likely to be implemented from 1 January 2016, Chidambaram said.

 

The sixth Pay Commission was implemented from 1 January 2006, fifth from 1 January 1996 and fourth from 1 January 1986.

 

The names of the chairperson and members of the 7th Pay Commission and its terms of reference will be finalised shortly after consultation with major stakeholders, Chidambaram said.

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COMMENTS

Ramesh Iyer

3 years ago

Seems this UPA govt is going all out to woo all classes of our population. With the FSB and NREGA it hopes to pocket rural votes, while with this kind of action it hopes to win votes of its own employees. In a 120 crore population, less than a crore are government servants, so in the large scheme of things, it doesn't appear to be a significant number. Moreover, the 7th Pay Commission recommendations will be effective Jan'16, and who knows which coalition govt will be in power at the time, and how they will treat the Commission's recommendations.
The public should see through such strategic moves by this corrupt UPA govt and elect leaders wisely the next time.

REPLY

Pantulu

In Reply to Ramesh Iyer 3 years ago

Yes the present central government has to go. Unfortunately people are not able to see through the games played by the so-called government headed by an Economist who could do nothing to improve the lot of common people.They are acting in such a way that similar criminals who toe their line will get elected. The recent case of Jagan getting bail in spite of his plunder is a classic example of their intentions. We do not have a leader who can convincingly explain such things to people.

BCCI imposes life ban on Lalit Modi

After removing Lalit Modi, the pioneer and commissioner of IPL, from all posts due to alleged corruption and financial irregularities, the BCCI has imposed life ban on him

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) has imposed a life ban on Lalit Modi, the former commissioner of Indian Premier League (IPL). The decision was taken at the BCCI's special general meeting on Wednesday.

 

Earlier, the Supreme Court refused to stay the BCCI special general meeting for considering the disciplinary committee’s report against Lalit Modi.

 

The apex court said that the Modi issue is an internal matter of BCCI and it will not interfere in it. It has asked Modi to appear and give his explanation before SGM on the charges levelled against him.

 

Modi, the pioneer and commissioner of IPL was removed from all posts by the BCCI due to alleged corruption and financial irregularities.

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COMMENTS

Ramesh Iyer

3 years ago

This would make no difference to Modi, who's obviously made his millions while being IPL boss before he was replaced. The govt must make BCCI a sports body under its supervision and control, like all other sports bodies in India. That would help clean the mess within BCCI, and bring it under the RTI, which should force it to be more transparent than it is today.

Shareholders’ title disputes come back to Company Law Board

The jurisdiction of CLB has been again extended to also include cases pertaining to rectification of register of members on matters other than transfer or transmission pursuant to section 59 of the new Companies Act

A revamp of Companies Act, 1956 (the Act, 1956) had been in the making for a long time and finally saw the light of the day with Companies Act, 2013 (the Act, 2013). With the use of the word ‘prescribed’ 416 times, it was obvious that a major part of the Act, 2013 was to be enforced by way of rules. However, on 12 September 2013, the Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) issued notification to enforce 98 sections. This was hailed as a premature action of the MCA, case in point being sections relating to insider trading, powers of Board, reference to the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT), which still required clarifications.

 

The MCA attempted to control its premature action by way of another clarification on 13 September 2013 and further by way of issue of Companies (Removal of Difficulties) Order, 2013 (the Order).

 

Although, the Order is surely a backtracking of sorts by the MCA, yet it brings back the power to adjudicate cases pertaining to ‘rectification of register of members’ to Company Law Board (CLB). The Order relates to sections 24, 58 and 59 of the Act.

 

Scenario under the Companies Act, 1956

 

The erstwhile Section 155 of the Act, 1956 empowered any aggrieved person to appeal to the court to seek rectification of register of members. This section was not limited just to rectification of register of members on matters pertaining to transfer or transmission, but extended to cases on any default or delay in entry in the register of members in cases apart from transfer and transmission. This section actually flowed from section 22A of the Securities Contracts (Regulations) Act, 1956 which allowed listed companies to refuse registration only under four scenarios. However, the stated section 22A was omitted with effect from 20 September 1995. Section 155 of the Act, 1956 was also omitted by the Companies (Amendment) Act, 1988 (wef 31 May 1991), vide GSR dated 31 May 1991.

 

Section 111 of the Act, 1956 was substituted with effect from 31 May 1991 by the Companies (Amendment) Act, 1988. With the insertion of section 111A of the Act, 1956 a void that was created with the deletion of section 155 of the Act, 1956 still remained. Section 155 of the Act, 1956 was applicable to public as well as private companies and allowed appeal for refusal to register in case of transfer or transmission or any other matter. Section 111(4) was also on the same lines, but by virtue of section 111(14) of the Act, 1956, the same was applicable only to private companies. Section 111A was made applicable only to public companies and consequently, appeal under this section could only lie with CLB, if the same pertained to disputes relating to either transfer or transmission. Any non-transfer or non-transmission case for public companies would become a civil matter, to be dealt with by the civil court.

 

A brief on the sections under Act, 2013

 

Section 24 – This section corresponds to section 55A of the Act, 1956 whereby matters pertaining to prospectus, return of allotment, redemption of preference shares shall be exercised by the NCLT.

 

Section 58 – This section corresponds to sections 111 and 111A of the Act, 1956 and empowers any person to appeal to NCLT against any refusal to register transfer or transmission of shares.

 

Section 59 – This section corresponds to sections 111 (4), (5), (9) and sec. 111A (3) and (5) of the Act, 1956 and empowers any aggrieved person or member to make an appeal if his name is without sufficient cause entered in the register of members and if registered removed from such register.

 

Power vested with CLB

 

The Preface of the Order, 2013 clearly mentions that the constitution of NCLT will take some time which gives rise to the question that since sections 24, 58 and 59 of the Act, 2013 have come into force, then which is the right forum for filing appeal? The Order, 2013 has thus been issued to solve this problem in exercise of section 470 of the Act, 2013.

Gist of the Order:

 

The Order confers jurisdiction on CLB for appeals under sections 24, 58 and 59 of the Act 2013, until the constitution of NCLT. 

 

With the Order, 2013, the jurisdiction of CLB has been again extended to also include cases pertaining to rectification of register of members on matters other than transfer or transmission pursuant to section 59 of the Act, 2013. The stated section 59 allows an aggrieved person to file an appeal for rectification of register of members. Such appeals shall till the constitution of NCLT, lie with CLB. Section 59 of the Act, 2013 has sought to amend the lacuna which was present in section 111A of the Act, 1956 and with CLB being empowered for the time being to handle such matters, wisdom seems to have prevailed.

 

(The writer is Company Secretary and works in Corporate Law Group at Vinod Kothari & Company. She can be contacted at [email protected] and [email protected] )

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COMMENTS

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3 years ago

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