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Controlling Your Mobile
You truly own your device only when you have root access and install a customised Android OS. Here is how to do it
 
If you want to control your mobile device, it literally means that you should be able to change its settings, parameters and themes (wallpapers too), according to your choice. Otherwise, what is the point of buying a device which is restricted? My point is simple. You own your mobile handset and should be able to do what you please with it, or use it as you please. 
 
It would be ideal if the manufacturer just supplied the hardware and installed the operating system (OS) as per the buyer’s choice. But this might take a few more years to become a reality. Almost all mobile handsets have certain limitations imposed by the manufacturers or mobile operators. Although it is done to protect the buyer, sometimes it also puts several restrictions on the usage.
 
Therefore, let’s see how you can take full control of your mobile device. The first step is rooting (for Android) which allows you to take control, like installing or using blocked apps and features or emulate some exclusive features. But, before proceeding further, let me warn you: rooting an Android device is not for the faint-hearted and you cannot hold anyone—including me—responsible if your device turns into a brick. (Don’t worry; there are ways to revive this brick, but more about this later.) One issue you need to be aware of is that rooting your device will void its warranty; unless the manufacture specifically allows it and all your data (on internal memory) will be gone, unless you had backed it up on an external SD card. Presently, Yureka from Yu Technologies (a unit of Micromax) allows device rooting without affecting the warranty. I would urge you to try this only on devices whose warranty has expired and the manufacturer is no more upgrading the OS or firmware. I am using Android KitKat (4.4.4) on my Galaxy SII that was left out in cold by Samsung at 2.3.6 without a chance for further updates.
 
Rooting can be done by using simple methods as well as using a command prompt and development interface known as Android Debug Bridge (ADB). Both methods are easy and there are plenty of detailed guides to follow. One of the best sites for Android-related devices is xda-developers.com. So, first search your device (exact name or model number is a must) on the portal and see if you can root or modify or install customised OS, like OmniROM or more popular CyanogenMod. From here, you need to download a custom recovery and the customised OS.
 
There are three steps involved in taking control of your Android device: unlocking bootloader, rooting and flashing customised read-only memory (ROM). Since several handset manufacturers these days are not locking the bootloader or selling devices with unlockable bootloaders, we can jump to the rooting task. 
 
Rooting needs a custom recovery image that can be flashed on the device. ClockworkMod (CWM) or TWRP are the two most popular ones. You need to copy either of the recovery images (in .zip file format), the customised ROM and Google Apps package to your device. You can even copy these files on the internal and external memory of your device. Every device is pre-set to enter into recovery mode. Use it to go into recovery mode. From there, select install .zip (from internal/external memory card) and choose the custom recovery file. Install the files. Reboot into recovery, install the ROM and Google Apps package using the same method. Reboot the device. 
 
And now you are a proud owner of your mobile handset. 
 
The steps I have mentioned here are most common; but please check detailed guidelines for your particular device on the website from where you have downloaded the recovery, ROM (OS) and Google apps files.

User

COMMENTS

saravanan ramamoorthy

1 year ago

Rooting the device is good, but its effect last only 3-6 months only and thereafter it starts malfunctioning - slow execution of app commands, frequent 'hang' like 'windows', etc. Even resetting the device to factory status does not work becuase the device should be unrooted now, so that the minimum speed functioning is restored at the factory status. So, virtually every device rooted need to be unrooted after a few months' time.

REPLY

Yogesh Sapkale

In Reply to saravanan ramamoorthy 1 year ago

Thanks for your comment. Rooting is basically done to explore more features of the OS besides gaining control over the device. Rooting remains till you unroot. so there is no question of effects lasting for limited period. What you are trying to say is the devices becomes slow after some time. But is has more to do with installing several applications or using more features. It is applicable to any and every OS, depending upon the hardware present and software installations.
Hope this clarifies your doubts.

Pravesh Pandya

1 year ago

I look forward to a day when you could just buy your mobile and install OS of your choice - as we get to do in laptops.

At one point or other, tablets, phones and laptops will converge. Currently the only difference between tablet/phone and laptop is 1. keyboard, 2. bulk 3. screensize, 4. hardware architecture.

The first three might get solved, but that last one would require industry wide effort to use standardised hardware.

Yoga: A New Awakening
Rules and regulations are more important than asanas for happy and healthy living
 
We must congratulate our prime minister for making the United Nations declare World Yoga Day on 21st June every year. I was invited to deliver the keynote address on that day at Vigyan Bhavan (Delhi). But, six months ago, I was invited to Lisbon (Portugal) to deliver the keynote and an inaugural lecture on the same day. Being a yoga enthusiast, I could not let down the organisers in Portugal by accepting the Indian government’s invitation at the last minute. Anyway, yoga is now becoming the mainstream.
 
Yoga is the lifestyle for a happy and healthy living in which rules and regulations (yama, niyamas) are much more important than the asanas. Pranayama, prathyaahaara, dhyana, dharana, samadhi and asana are the other legs. Commercialised yoga, especially in the United States, has become an asana-centred business with lots of unscientific methods like ‘hot yoga’ thrown in. I appeal to all: don’t reduce an asana to just a physical exercise, although the asana is an integral part of yoga. Sage Patanjali himself had noted that constant ease is the main role of asanas.
 
One can become a yogi just by pursuing an authentic lifestyle to be useful to mankind. Religiously doing asanas daily and chanting mantras for an hour, but doing negative business for the rest of the day, does not qualify one to be a yogi. The good that accrues from yogic lifestyle is due to the tranquillity of mind that it bestows as a positive side-effect. The responsibility of propounding the correct methodology of yoga to the world rested on the shoulders of India from where it originated. 
 
Morarji Desai National Institute of Yoga, New Delhi, must take the lead and should have regular week-long courses for people interested from all over the world, in addition to other courses. Dr Ishwar V Basavaraddy, the present director of the Institute, is a young, but wise, and able administrator. He should be able to achieve this target.
 
With this new awakening, the world should become aware of this simple method that could boost the inner healer to avoid many silent killers like diabetes, hypertension, cancers and other metabolic syndromes. A study showed that if 10% of the society becomes tranquil, the crime rate would come down by 50%. 
 
Pranayama, or true yogic breathing style, has many therapeutic benefits. Regular belly button breathing, otherwise called the abdominal breathing, benefits almost all human organs, except the menstrual cycle. This is called ‘mode-locking’ in physics. In this dynamic universe, the most dominant rhythm controls (mode-locks) all other rhythms. In the human system, breathing is the most dominant rhythm; hence, proper breathing can bring the following health benefits:
Quickly increases peripheral cell oxygenation helping people with heart failure.
Makes the mind tranquil, helps control anxiety and panic attacks, without drugs. Drug treatment of these is unscientific as the human mind is not confined to the brain nor is it a child of the brain function.
It improves the heart rate, a good yardstick to measure the heart’s health status.
In a study, 100 poor patients with multiple coronary blocks were told that they would die without interventions. They could not afford the treatment. A study of those patients showed that with a yogic life style and simple medication, all of them survived and the heart muscle was shown by scans to have been effectively re-vascularised!
Multiple benefits for various other musculoskeletal abnormalities.
David Shananoff-Khalsa, a researcher with University of California, San Diego, has been working with Kriya Yoga in diseases as disparate as epilepsy to obsessive compulsive disorders (OCDs) with remarkable results.
 
‘Yoga’, in Sanskrit means yuj or yolk, revealing the connect between individual consciousness and universal consciousness. The latter is the king now. Consciousness is the root from where all matter emanates. It is the reality.

 

(Professor Dr BM Hegde, a Padma Bhushan awardee in 2010, is an MD, PhD, FRCP (London, Edinburgh, Glasgow & Dublin), FACC and FAMS.)

User

COMMENTS

Achin

1 year ago

Why we need to cite Western Doctors or intellectuals to bring credibility to our writing ?
You have also done it in your last point. Why can't you take data from Indian institutions and quote them ?

Narendra Doshi

1 year ago

well said and worth remebering before doing without a thought / blind following.

How to save yourself from cyber fraud and maintain your privacy
Every internet user needs to understand risks associated with transactions in cyber space; implications of data leaks and privacy breaches through social media or email transactions and know remedies that are available, say Nandkumar Saravade and Dr Rakesh Goyal, the experts in cyber security and risk management
 
The cybercrime and privacy breach in India has been mutating every few months. In this scenario, it is important for every user to understand risks associated with transactions in cyber space; implications of data leaks and privacy breaches through social media or email transactions and your remedies, say Nandkumar Saravade and Dr Rakesh Goyal, two experts in cyber security and risk management. They were speaking at a houseful seminar organised by Moneylife Foundation in Mumbai.
 
According to Mr Saravade, who just took over as chief executive at Data Security Council of India (DSCI), user awareness about internet, cyber laws and risks pose a big challenge in India. Especially, when we consider the wide strata of users, from tech savvy to new users, as well as different socio-economic conditions, demographics, culture and age, making them aware about the risk and saving them from cyber frauds is a significant challenge before law enforcement agencies as well as the government, he said.
 
“Cyber criminals exploit jurisdictional arbitrage knowing the practical difficulties faced by police in investigating outside their jurisdiction. The fight against cyber fraud is challenging when the judiciary clubs financial cases along with other kinds of schemes. Therefore, there is a need to revisit current laws - some over a century old and new focused legislation in the domain is an immediate requirement to keep up with the rapidly scaling fraud landscape,” Mr Saravade, the former IPS officer and Director for Cyber Security and compliance at NASSCOM, said.
 
According to Mr Saravade, what started with opportunistic attacks on unsuspecting victims has now become a well-organised industry with clear business plans based on understanding of the market, distribution network and business development by going into virgin territories. He said, “Small and medium enterprises in India have seen targeted attacks on their e-mail accounts to give fraudulent instructions to their banks to remit funds to mule accounts abroad. In addition, traditional fraudsters like those running pyramid schemes have taken to the Internet for casting their nets far and wide, the SpeakAsia case being a prime example. The numbers tell the story: 26 lakh investors lost Rs2,276 crore, in a Ponzi scheme which ran for a mere few months.”
 
Speaking about privacy in cyber space and how it can affect the user, Dr Rakesh Goyal, the Director-General of Centre for Research and Prevention of Computer Crimes and MD of Sysman Computers Pvt Ltd highlighted that the advancement of cyber technology has not only made it easier to communicate, socialise, complete financial transactions at a click of a button and a host of other benefits, but it has even made it easier for others to easily access the data you share over the net.
 

Dr Goyal, who has 42 years’ experience including 24 years in IT security consulting, explained how cyber space works. “There is no free lunch,” he said, “You may get a free service, but the companies in turn access your personal information to analyse your marketing and related behaviour. This is then sold to spammers, marketing analysts, blackmailers, competitors or even by state players for surveillance. Cyber thieves look to steal you bank passwords and credit card data.”
 
“There are several ways your data can be stolen,” explained Dr Goyal, a PhD holder in Cyber Security. “It can be by inserting malware, spyware, key loggers, botnet or malvertisement,” he said.  “Even if you access a malicious or unsecure websites your data can be siphoned off. Unpatched bugs in your operating system or applications too, can be a window through which your data can be accessed.”
 
In the world of smartphone technology, your mobile phone acts as your personal computer. Many unknowingly authorise applications to access their data. Free gaming applications or even an app, as simple as, a mobile flashlight can be used to access all the data you store on your mobile phone. “You use free app, they steal your data,” quipped Dr Goyal. “These apps can effortlessly access your name, age, address, email, phone number, take full network control, call phone numbers, send messages, access your location and record audio and video,” he cautioned.
 
“Therefore, next time you put your information on the web, look at the costs versus benefits. Remember, your identity is at stake, your assets are at stake and your existence is at stake. You should be responsible for your own security,” concluded Dr Goyal.
 

User

COMMENTS

Anand Vaidya

1 year ago

Also let us remember that all mobile devices are made in China and many could have backdoors inserted by the Chinese Govt.

I have avoided buying brands such as Xiaomi which puts an entire layer above android and there were some accusations of them stealing personal data...

REPLY

Ameet Patel

In Reply to Anand Vaidya 1 year ago

Good point Anand. The problem is that even non Chinese brands are now made in China. So, what does one do?

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