Concor's depot still not ready since 2010

The state government had, on 17 October 2008, signed an agreement with Concor for setting up the inland container depot in Solan district with an outlay of Rs57.45 crore

 

The exporters in Himachal Pradesh's prominent industrial belt Baddi are yet to get the benefit of an inland container depot of the Container Corporation of India (Concor), which was scheduled to be ready by January 2010, the Comptroller Auditor General of India (CAG) has said.
 
The government watchdog said failure to operationalise the inland container depot rendered the expenditure of Rs19.75 crore unfruitful as the intended beneficiaries remained deprived of the benefits.
 
The auditor, in its recent report, said non-issue of necessary notification by the government of India, the Central Board of Excise and Customs and non-posting of staff were mainly responsible for its delay.
 
It blamed the state director industries, too, for not pursuing the case regularly with the government of India over delay in its completion.
 
The state government had, on 17 October 2008, signed an agreement with Concor for setting up the inland container depot in Solan district with an outlay of Rs57.45 crore.
 
The state-owned Concor -- which operates inland transport services and cargo handling across the country -- was to construct the depot in 15 months. It was to invest Rs27.78 crore out of the total expenditure.
 
The state in April 2009 transferred 17.2 acres of government land to Concor for the construction of the depot on a 95-year lease of Re1 per acre per annum.
 
The phase I of the project, which included construction of a warehouse, was completed in May 2013.
 
The phase II, in which the depot was to be linked with the rail network, was scheduled to be undertaken after commissioning of the Chandigarh-Baddi rail link and till that time the road-fed service was to be provided.
 
Official sources said that when the agreement was signed in 2008, then chief minister Prem Kumar Dhumal had said Concor would transport products valued at over Rs700 crore annually.
 

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Was GRP Commissioner Singhal transferred for raising commuter issues?
Dr Ravinder Singhal as Commissioner of GRP raised several discrepancies related with faster medical treatment for injured and the 108 ambulance service, and this may be a reason for his transfer in just eight months, feel activists
 
The Maharashtra Government has transferred Dr Ravindra Singhal, the Commissioner of Govt Railway Police (GRP) as Special Inspector General (Training). Although he was transferred along with 37 other officers from the Indian Police Service (IPS) cadre, Dr Singhal's posting does not appear to be 'routine', as he was made Commissioner of GRP just eight months ago. Dr Singhal was very active in protecting railway commuters and raised several issues like medical treatment for victims during golden hour, and non-availability of proper equipment in 108 ambulances and this may be the reason for his transfer, feel activists. 
 
According to replies received by activist Samir Zaveri under the Right to Information (RTI) Act, Dr Singhal had sent three letters to General Manager (GM) of Western Railway (WR) for providing medical treatment to victims during the first hour of the incident.
 
Dr Singhal, in a letter dated 8 April 2015 to the GM (WR) raised the issue of non-availability of necessary medical equipment in ambulances. Citing an incident on 14 March 2015, he said, "The injured was rushed to alliance hospital at Nalasopara through the ambulance but it was observed that there was no oxygen mask in the ambulance, so oxygen could not be given to patient and unfortunately the injured victim died in the hospital on the same day. This is a clear-cut breach of contract. So kindly instruct station masters to check the ambulance from time to time so that such incidents are averted and lives of the injured can be saved."
 
Health Services department in Maharashtra has signed an agreement with BVG India Ltd for providing ambulance services through 108 number helpline. Earlier in March, Maharashtra government informed the Bombay High Court that it had levied a fine of Rs2.24 lakh on BVG India. This came after the inspections ordered by the High Court found defaults and deficiencies in the 108 ambulance service. The court was hearing a petition filed by Zaveri seeking medical aid to rail accident victims within the "Golden hour" and setting up of emergency medical rooms at stations. 
 
In March, the IPS officer also requested the GM for WR to extend emergency medical treatment facility for injured persons in a railway accident between Virar to Palghar section. Since March 2012, WR is making arrangement for treatment of injured victims in nearby private hospitals at railway cost in Dahisar and Virar section. "...the same needs to be extended up to Palghar section as injured at present are being shifted to Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Hospital at Kandivli, which is at a distance of 60kms from Palghar station. Hence, it is necessary to tie up with nearby private hospital in Dahisar to Virar section to meet with the 'Golden Hour' rule and same needs to be extended up to Palghar station." Dr Singhal had said in the letter dated 17 March 2015.
 
He also requested the Railways to place necessary permanent signboards at accident-prone locations. He said, "...proper signage are required at different locations so that they act as deterrent to the commuters while they travel through trains and cross the railway line. The template for this can be designed by the RPF and GRP together and locations to fix them will also be done jointly."    
 
In addition, Dr Singhal, in a letter sent to Maharashtra's Director for Health Services, expressed displeasure for not being invited GRP Commissioner (Mumbai) and Superintendent of Police (at Pune and Nagpur) for Committee meetings related with the 108-ambulance service.
 
In a letter dated 17 March 2015, Dr Singhal said, "I wish to draw your attention towards the agreement dated 1 March 2014 made between Director, Health Services and BVG India Ltd for providing ambulance services through 108 helpline. It is obligation on your part to invite GRP Commissioner (and SPs) in Committee Meetings. However, we do not receive any intimation of invitation to attend such meetings, for which we can contribute positively."
 
No wonder, about 200 locals from Ghatkopar took out a morcha on Monday to protest transfer of Dr Singhal as GRP Commissioner. According to reports, protesters claimed that Dr Singhal's work was 'exemplary' as the Commissioner of GRP and he should have been given more time. 
 
In August 2014, Dr Singhal, who is from the 1996 IPS batch, took over as Commissioner for GRP. Earlier, in 2009 and 2010 he served as SP Railways at Nagpur, where he started a project for providing safe shelter and education to abandoned children who were seen begging on trains and at railway platforms.  

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COMMENTS

Narendra Doshi

2 years ago

You are right MDT.Transfer needs to be reconsidered.
Kudos to Dr Singhal & our Sameer Zaveri.

Modi faces tough task to make India business-friendly: Canadian daily

Modi's message that India was 'open for business' as a rising economic power was what made his visit to Canada all the more 'significant', the daily said in an editorial

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will have an uphill task in trying to open up his country's economy for business, notwithstanding his "rock star" image in India and among the Indian community abroad, Canadian daily Toronto Star has said.
 
Modi's message that India was "open for business" as a rising economic power was what made his visit to Canada all the more "significant", the daily said in an editorial on Tuesday.
 
"But Modi and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) have their work cut out creating conditions that favour trade. And rock star status isn't forever," the editorial cautioned.
 
Modi reached Canadian capital Ottawa on Tuesday on the last leg of his three-nation tour after successful visits to France and Germany. He is the first Indian prime minister to visit Canada in 42 years since Indira Gandhi visited in 1973.
 
In Canada, Modi will meet Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the captains of major Canadian companies, apart from addressing the Indian diaspora there.
 
As in France and Germany, he will hard sell the "Make in India" initiative in Canada, calling for investments.
 
"From Canada's perspective, Modi's modernising, pro-growth, pro-foreign-investment agenda can make India a prime trading partner, provided he makes good on promises to pry open his country's centrally-directed and overly-protected economy and to rein in official corruption," the daily said.
 
"India is a vast market. It has a population of 1.2 billion, a middle class of 350 million, an economy that's growing three times faster than ours and a potentially huge demand for the know-how and resources we sell," it added.
 
There was demand in India for Canadian expertise in information and communication technologies, education, infrastructure, oil and gas extraction, and power generation, the daily said, adding that Canadian resources like food, fertilizers, minerals, and now uranium were highly sought after.
 
"Yet cooperation has been slow to develop. Back in 2009, we vowed to boost our paltry $3-billion two-way trade to $15 billion by this year. It never happened. Last year we did just $6 billion worth, compared to $77 billion with China. And hopes for a Canada-India free trade pact remain aspirational at best," the editorial lamented.
 
However, it was optimistic that a "feel-good" visit to Canada, like the one undertaken by Modi, would help.
 
The daily has maintained that Canada and India had a lot in common.
 
It, however, pointed out that the bilateral ties suffered a setback following the testing of nuclear weapons by India in 1974 and 1998.
 
"Former US President George Bush, who saw India as an ally against China, eventually turned the page when he endorsed selling India 'civilian' nuclear technology, a policy adopted in 2008. Soon Harper was off to India to 'revitalize relations'," the editorial said.
 
The daily, while acknowledging Modi's "stunning mandate" in the general elections last year, noted that a year later, his delivery has been "modest" and that "his popularity shows signs of fading".
 
Modi was "still struggling to overcome a trust deficit", it said, adding, "When he was chief minister in Gujarat in 2002, anti-Muslim rioting killed 1,000 or more. Many Sikhs, too, mistrust the BJP's nationalism."
 
"In Canada, Modi is spreading the word that India is a profoundly-changed place, where the smart money is headed. Back home, he needs to be the change he wants to see," the daily said.

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COMMENTS

B. Yerram Raju

2 years ago

The message, a stunning one, that 'backhome Modi has to be the change he wants to see'is the one that deserves utmost attention. We have to get rid of sycophancy and help the PM to take actionable agenda with speed of action and continual evaluation.

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