Citizens' Issues
Cold weather kills far more people than hot weather: Lancet

It is often assumed that extreme weather causes the majority of deaths, with most previous research focusing on the effects of extreme heat waves

 

After analysing over 74 million deaths in 384 locations across 13 countries, a global study has revealed that cold weather kills 20 times as many people as hot weather.
 
The findings, published in the prestigious journal The Lancet, also found that deaths due to moderately hot or cold weather substantially exceed those resulting from extreme heat waves or cold spells.
 
It is often assumed that extreme weather causes the majority of deaths, with most previous research focusing on the effects of extreme heat waves.
 
"Our findings show that the majority of these deaths actually happen on moderately hot and cold days, with most deaths caused by moderately cold temperatures," said lead author Antonio Gasparrini from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.
 
The study analysed over 74 million deaths between 1985 and 2012 in 13 countries with a wide range of climates, from cold to subtropical.
 
Around 7.71 percent of all deaths were caused by non-optimal temperatures, with substantial differences between countries, ranging from around three percent in Thailand, Brazil and Sweden to about 11 percent in China, Italy and Japan.
 
Cold was responsible for the majority of these deaths (7.29 percent of all deaths), while just 0.42 percent of all deaths were attributable to heat.
 
The study also found that extreme temperatures were responsible for less than one percent of all deaths.
 
Mildly sub-optimal temperatures accounted for around seven percent of all deaths - with most (6.66 percent of all deaths) related to moderate cold.
 
Current public-health policies focus almost exclusively on minimising the health consequences of heat waves.
 
"Our findings suggest that these measures need to be refocused and extended to take account of a whole range of effects associated with temperature," suggested Gasparrini.

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Mumbai real estate value to go up 6%: Report

With enquiries for residential property rising, builders hope the market would recover in the coming months, though many of them are wooing potential customers by offering discounts, freebies, waivers and attractive schemes to book orders

 

Contrary to speculation among buyers and investors that housing property prices may further dip in the city, global real estate firm JLL India hinted that these would appreciate six percent this fiscal (2015-16).
 
"Our reading of the market, however, indicates that residential prices across the city would start moving upwards from second half of FY 2016," JLL India chief operating officer Ramesh Nair said in a statement here on Thursday.
 
Observing that the residential property market would see buying revive in the next six months, Nair said buyers would, however, look for good deals by taking advantage of the prevailing subdued market conditions.
 
With enquiries for residential property rising, builders hope the market would recover in the coming months, though many of them are wooing potential customers by offering discounts, freebies, waivers and attractive schemes to book orders.
 
"In some areas, builders are offering discounts up to 10 percent on the base price of a property to buyers who are serious about making purchases," Nair asserted.
 
Other buyers can negotiate the floor rise charges, get them waived off by the authority concerned or those who are not in hurry can book a flat of his choice at the pre-launch stage of a project at competitive prices.
 
"For instance, booking a flat at project stage in south Mumbai translates into 8-10 percent discount. In a eastern suburb, apartments are offered at Rs.8,000 per square feet at pre-launch stage while a ready-to-occupy flat would cost Rs.14,000 per square feet," Nair pointed out.
 
A study by the Indian subsidiary of Jones Lang Lasalle (JLL) revealed that the pre-launch stage schemes' were popular as buyers would have to pay only a small percentage of the total amount and get a risk-free investment opportunity.
 
"The schemes also enable developers to woo buyers and cover the interest rate they (customers) have to pay to banks on housing loans," Nair added.
 
For investors who are bulk buyers and prefer square feet areas than units to sell before or soon after taking possession are given special deals at prices ranging from Rs.18,000-20,000 square feet in south Mumbai areas like Lower Pare and Worli as against the current market price of Rs.30,000 square feet.
 
Interestingly, new locations in peripheral areas such as Ulwe, Kamothe, Karanjade and Dronagiri in Navi Mumbai command better price appreciation than in established locations, thanks to the upcoming international airport in Navi Mumbai and the Mumbai trans harbour link. 
 

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COMMENTS

Ramesh

1 year ago

Prices can move up or down. Essentially, if you are buying a home for your own use, you have to look at reviews on PROPSURF ( http://www.propsurf.com )

Indian military lab develops kit to detect swine flu in hours

While current tests to detect the swine flu virus takes two to three days, the new kit delivers results in two to three hours, knowledgeable officials in the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) told IANS

 

In a major breakthrough in detecting the deadly swine flu virus that killed around 2,000 people in India in an outbreak this year, a key military research centre has developed a kit that can detect the virus in a matter of hours.
 
While current tests to detect the swine flu virus takes two to three days, the new kit delivers results in two to three hours, knowledgeable officials in the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) told IANS.
 
Developed by the Gwalior-based Defence Research and Development Establishment (DRDE), the kit will also be cost-effective and is expected to be priced at around Rs.2,000 ($30), while the present tests can cost anything between Rs.4,500 and Rs.10,000 in the peak season.
 
"While conventional identification methods require time-consuming culturing and detection of anti-bodies, this kit uses a gene amplification method and is based on the principle of auto-cyclic strand displacement mechanism," a DRDO official aware of the developments told IANS on condition of anonymity as he is not authorised to speak to the media.
 
The DRDO, which leads defence research in the country, focussed on developing the kit in view of possible enhanced use of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear warfare (CBRN) in future, the official said.
 
"In case of a biological weapon being used, the first step to combat this is detection. Handy kits like these are being developed keeping that in mind," the official said.
 
Asked if the kit can be used on a large scale, the official said some firms have already been given the technology to develop the kits.
 
"Our role is to develop the technology. We have already handed it over to some interested manufacturers. It will now be up to the government to decide if it wants to use it at a larger level," the official added.
 
Swine flu has claimed well over two thousand lives in India till March this year with the total number of cases crossing the 33,000 mark, according to the health ministry. Rajasthan and Gujarat were the worst affected states.

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