Companies & Sectors
Cipla acquires two US drug firms for $550 mn

The company had informed Bombay Stock Exchange on Sep 4, last year that the cash consideration payable for Invagen is $500 million and for Exelan it is $50 million

 

Drug major Cipla has acquired two US-based firms -- InvaGen Pharmaceuticals and Exelan Pharmaceuticals -- for $550 million, the company said in a regulatory filing here on Thursday.
 
"The acquisition was made by Cipla's UK arm Cipla through a wholly-owned special purpose vehicle which would merge into InvaGen Pharmaceuticals after the acquisition. The combined revenue for the two companies for the year-ended 2015 is over $230 million," the company said in a statement.
 
The company had informed Bombay Stock Exchange on Sep 4, last year that the cash consideration payable for Invagen is $500 million and for Exelan it is $50 million.
 
"The acquisition will further strengthen Cipla's presence in US pharmaceutical market. InvaGen's balanced portfolio, robust manufacturing base and strong R&D capabilities will act as lever to expand Cipla's reach in the US market," said Umang Vohra, global chief operating officer.
 
The acquisition is expected to scale to Cipla's US business, currently 8 percent of total revenue and provide a launch pad to introduce its pipeline of products in the respiratory and injectables space, among other products. 
 
This is the second landmark acquisition in Cipla's 80 year history after the one in South Africa.
 
InvaGen pharmaceuticals also provides Cipla about 40 approved abbreviated new drug applications, 32 marketed products, and 30 pipeline products which are expected to be approved over the next four years, the company said.
 
Exelan was incorporated in the year 2011 and is engaged in the business of sales and marketing of generic pharmaceuticals for the government and institutional market.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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India's GDP to grow next fiscal at 7.5%: Moody's

India is relatively less exposed to external factors, including China slowdown and global capital flows

 

US agency Moody's Investors Service on Thursday forecast for India a "stable GDP growth at around 7.5% in 2016 and 2017", saying the country is relatively less exposed to external headwinds, like the Chinese slowdown, and will benefit from lower commodity prices.
 
India is relatively less exposed to external factors, including China slowdown and global capital flows. Instead, the economic outlook will be primarily determined by domestic factors, Moody's said in its report "Global Macro Outlook 2016-17 - Global growth faces rising risks at time of policy constraint".
 
"Together with Turkey and China among the G20 emerging markets, India benefits from lower commodity prices: In 2014, net commodity imports amounted to 5.9% of India's GDP, compared with net exports worth 1.3%, 3.3% and 4.3% for South Africa, Brazil and Indonesia respectively," it said on Thursday.
 
"In the five years to the end of the decade, we expect GDP per capita (at market exchange rates) to increase by 34% in real terms in India, compared with only 3.6% in the G20 emerging markets, excluding China and India," the report added.
 
Instead, the American agency cautioned that India's economic environment is constrained by "banks' balance sheet repair and elevated corporate debt" and the corporate pricing power being constrained by the impact of two consecutive droughts on food price inflation and households budgets.
 
India's economy is powered by sustained growth in consumer spending, fostered by moderate inflation, still favourable demographics and strengthening investment, in particular foreign direct investment, Moody's said.
 
"The 23.55% increase in public sector salaries proposed by the 7th Pay Commission is worth 0.7% of GDP. It is not yet known how this proposal will be implemented but higher public sector wages will most likely contribute to strong consumption growth," the report said.
 
"The pay increase will also probably raise inflationary pressures. However, we assume the government will cut spending in other parts of the budget to maintain the deficit broadly in line with the 3.5% of GDP objective, thereby mitigating some of the inflationary effects," it added.
 
Moody's said overall growth will fail to pick up steam over the next two years as the slowdown in China, lower commodity prices and tighter financing in some countries weigh on the economy.
 
The Indian economy grew 7.3% in the third quarter ended December 31, 2015 -- down from the 7.7% expansion in the previous quarter, but marginally up over the 7.1% over the like period of last fiscal, official data showed last week.
 
Growth was pulled down by lower production in 'agriculture, forestry and fishing', 'electricity, gas and water supply and other utility services' and 'financial, real estate and professional services'.
 
There was a 6% growth in electricity, gas, water supply and other utility services, as against 7.5% growth in the second quarter.
 
The government's mid-year economic review, released in December, lowered the economic growth forecast for the current fiscal to the 7-7.5 percent range, from the previously projected 8.1%-8.5%, mainly because of lower agricultural output due to deficit rainfall.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Time to call the US Fed's bluff and get long gold
Recall that the median forecast was for three Fed rate hikes in 2016 only two months ago
 
Global financial markets have started to price in a global recession since the beginning of 2016. The Fed raised rates for the first time in almost a decade but the price action has been extremely counterintuitive: US yields down, US Dollar Index down and gold rallying through the key $1,200 level.
 
There has been a huge repricing in the federal funds futures market with the bond market now pricing in only a 20 percent probability of another interest rate hike in 2016.
 
Recall that the median forecast was for three Fed rate hikes in 2016 only two months ago.
 
Investors are now questioning the effectiveness of future central bank ammunition to fight a slowdown in economic growth and demand. The discussion has now shifted from the pace of monetary tightening to what type of easing is in the pipeline. Will we witness negative rates or helicopter drops by global central banks in the coming quarters as financial conditions worsen. 
 
Are negative nominal rates effective? Can they lead to reversing deflationary trends and boosting aggregate demand? If not, are currency wars or devaluing domestic currencies to produce growth the next logical step? If so, will these devaluations be a zero sum game with clear winners and losers? What about the good old fiscal policy prescriptions? If monetary policy is indeed ineffective (the prevailing mood in the market!), how much political capital do policymakers have to pull the fiscal levers? 
 
The policy of borrowing from future earnings to repay todays debts has tested investors' patience on many occasions since the financial crisis. Thus, anything short of carefully thought out and well executed structural reforms will immensely disappoint the markets.
 
Only time will tell which of the above scenarios plays out. We have seen Japan going into negative interest rate territory in recent weeks and the yen has appreciated and the stock market failed to rally. Similarly, ECB President Mario Draghi has done all he could to talk down the euro with more QE talk but the common currency has been holding up.
 
Clearly, markets are not behaving as per central banks' expectations.
 
Gold prices are a function of many variables - real interest rates, the US dollar, inflation expectations and the trend of the broader commodity market. However, in recent times it is simply a play on global volatility and global systemic risk. So if financial conditions do worsen from here, expect gold to rally through the $1,325 level and in extension $1,460 even if the USD is bid as a safe haven and commodities are falling.
 
Central banks and the effectiveness of ultra-loose monetary policies have proved to be ineffective. Expectations of more QE and negative rates to generate growth is simply wishful thinking. If things play out like 2008, the only silver lining is to remember that there was a March, 2009. 
 
The time to buy distressed equities will come but it is not now. This is the time to hedge against another global crisis and buy gold.

 

Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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