World
Chinese fugitive arrested after posting holiday selfies

The 27-year-old man, surnamed Qin, went into hiding last year after reputedly being hired as a hitman and seriously injuring his target, a villager in central China's Henan province

 

Chinese police have captured a fugitive who revealed his whereabouts by posting holiday selfies on social media.
 
The 27-year-old man, surnamed Qin, went into hiding last year after reputedly being hired as a hitman and seriously injuring his target, a villager in central China's Henan province.
 
But on May 3, the last day of the May Day holiday, Qin emerged on the popular messaging and photo-sharing service WeChat with selfies taken on Wudang Mountain in Hubei province, which neighbours Henan to the south. The photos were forwarded by an unwitting friend of Qin and drew the attention of the police.
 
Wudang Mountain police said on Monday that they quickly located Qin by identifying the photos' backdrops and made the arrest on May 5, Xinhua news agency reported.
 
According to the police, Qin told them that he had joined a group of friends on the mountain tour and, believing that "the most dangerous place is the safest", even registered in a luxury hotel right beside the police station.
 
He posted the selfies as the relaxing trip made him complacent about his fugitive status, he said. 

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Strengthening India's healthcare system
The first and foremost challenge on the healthcare front will be addressing and tackling the diseases and understanding the disease patterns
 
One of the biggest challenges India faces and will continue to face in the forthcoming decades is in the context of healthcare. It would include issues like health accessibility, infant mortality rates, the stunted growth of children because of ill health, maternal health, disease patterns among its adult population as well as the challenges pertaining to its ageing population, among others. It is bound to be further accentuated by processes like urbanization and ever-growing pollution levels.
 
The first and foremost challenge on the healthcare front will be addressing and tackling the diseases and understanding the disease patterns. Another related challenge is also to make health care affordable and accessible and to ensure that there is trust and synergy between the public and private health sector service providers and the common people. The challenge of access is also more pronounced because of the shortage of finance that results in a lack of infrastructure and manpower. Healthcare spending is a dismal 1 percent of GDP in India. The private sector contributes 80 percent in healthcare, and ideally this indicates that the government should increase spending to a target of 3 percent of the GDP in the near future. 
 
The three-tiered system works poorly at the third level the primary healthcare centres. It is both because of the quality and quantity of manpower in the healthcare domain at this level. There is thus an urgent need to improve the quality and functionality of the primary healthcare centres within the country that at present is severely compromised. It has to be done while keeping healthcare sustainable and affordable to the general population within the country. It requires leadership from the government. 
 
The pharmaceutical industry's capacity utilization in India is 45 percent. It can be increased to 55 percent with a strategic vision for accessibility and access to medicines at affordable prices. There are a few things that the government can do for boosting growth within the healthcare space. It includes doing away with inefficient spending, looking at outputs rather than constraints in healthcare expenditure as well as doing away with the regulation of prices of drugs barring the necessary medicines, etc. Also, telemedicine and e-consultations hold promise for the vast majority of common ailments. However, building infrastructure and expertise is critical for improved access. 
 
The contrary view is that the Government that makes budgetary allocation cuts towards healthcare has to be seen from a sympathetic view. The sympathetic view is driven by the idea that it does not make sense to throw money at a system that hardly works, performs or is a big black hole. The ideas also push towards thinking that a new approach and system is required that redefines the way we look at the healthcare system in the country.
 
The universal health argument boils down to two things. First, something needs to be done to remove people out of poverty and penury. It can happen only with greater opportunity for employment. Also, 40 million people are impoverished because of the health burden - out of pocket expenses. In India, the out of pocket spending is 70 percent. It has to be reduced. The second deals with designing a healthcare system. The healthcare system has two cornerstones namely satisfaction from the health system and sustainability of healthcare system for everybody. Similar to the other social security schemes a social security scheme for health insurance should be floated that ensures increased health care from the scheme when the person suffers from an ailment. It is like making essential drugs available to people for free through insurance. 
 
Thus, the government has to make a healthcare delivery framework where trust is embedded as the basis of the framework. The government also has to rethink how the framework is set and implemented. It requires reform and building a system that is trustworthy at the same time responsive to the needs of a low resource setting. Use of technology for reducing access as well as transaction costs can also help in building a better framework. Also, there is a need to fix accountability and responsibility where it is due especially to the private sector where there is a profit motive involved. Doctors should be driven by ethical and professional principles rather than just a profit motive. The government also has to look at the long-term vision and the health challenges being faced by the country. It involves greater investments and doing away with redundant laws if the need so arises. In addition, the framework has to look at the concept of health audit, to measure the performance of hospitals. The doctors may initially resist this practice, but the accreditation of hospitals would be a good start for measuring the performance of Hospitals that improves healthcare delivery over time. Improvements happen when proper systems are designed with proper documentation and process flows. 
 
A new health system can be designed along with universal access only when medicines are looked at in a new light. It is because medicines play a key role for health needs in a developing country like India. Medicines need to be a part of the health insurance in India as 72 percent of the health expense is on medicines in India. Also required is a new ministry under a minister for state for pharmaceuticals that assists India in developing and catering to the medicinal needs of the population. Also, the need is to look at incentive structures in healthcare, as the cost of health is identical to income; investments by public money are far greater in other countries as compared to India. It can be viewed as a long-term sustainability issue, and the system has to be based on outcomes rather than expenditure figures alone. 
 
The new system can be designed with common principles of competition, regulation, equity and access. While these can be the guiding principles a one size fits all approach to healthcare needs of an individual state may be detrimental to effective healthcare governance. The government has to take leadership in investing more and enabling greater participation through the PPP mode that is just one of the ways of enabling greater public-private participation. What is required is a system of checks and balances. The government needs to kickstart the process and provide a vision. This is where the country faces its biggest challenge, the challenge of dissonance between the political vision and effective implementation.

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Lok Sabha passes black money bill
The Undisclosed Foreign Income and Assets bill, providing for heavy penalties for stashing black money away in foreign accounts, was passed by the Lok Sabha on Monday.
 
Moving what is called the Black Money Bill for acceptance by the lower house, Finance Minister Arun Jaitley rejected the opposition's demand of referring the bill to the Standing Committee, saying delay in enacting the legislation would provide opportunity to offenders to transfer unaccounted overseas wealth quickly to unknown destinations.
 
"The Bill (introduced in March) has no connection with domestic black money," Jaitley said replying to the debate on the bill.
 
"For the first time, unlawful, undisclosed income abroad has been taxed under this law at a tax rate of 30 percent with an additional 30 percent penalty on it," he added.
 
Explaining that a time-frame will be provided as a "compliance window for declaring and paying penalty", Jaitley said that failure to meet the compliance timeline will attract an additional penalty of 90 percent for a total tax liability of 120 percent on the quantum of black money abroad.
 
Besides, law provides for rigorous imprisonment of up to 3-10 years for perpetrators, he added.
 
The finance minister said India was foremost among a large number of countries that were taking interest in the G-20 initiative on automatic transmission of information with regard to monetary transaction.
 
Admitting that there was no official estimation of black money within India or stashed away abroad, Jaitley told parliament last week that the government was examining the reports of three institutes on the matter.
 
"Varying estimations of the amount of illicit money moving out of the country have been reported by different persons/institutions. Such estimations are based upon different sets of facts, data, methods and assumptions, leading to varying inferences," he told the Rajya Sabha in a written reply.
 
"However, there is no official estimation of the amount of black money stashed abroad or black money taken out of country," he added.
 
The previous United Progressive Alliance government had in March 2011 asked the National Institute of Public Finance and Policy (NIPFP), National Council of Applied Economic Research (NCAER) and National Institute of Financial Management (NIFM) to estimate unaccounted income and wealth inside and outside the country.
 
An unofficial estimate of illegal money stashed away overseas puts it somewhere between $466 billion and $1.4 trillion.

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