Nation
Chidambaram rules out probe into Vadra-DLF business deals

According to the Finance Minister, private transactions cannot and ought not to be allowed to be questioned on the basis of imputations and insinuations

New Delhi: Ruling out any probe into business dealings between Sonia Gandhi's son-in-law Robert Vadra and realty major DLF, Finance Minister P Chidambaram on Monday said the government cannot look into private transactions unless there are specific allegations of corruption, reports PTI.

 

"...unless there is a specific allegation of quid pro quo or corruption, I am afraid private transactions cannot and ought not to be allowed to be questioned on the basis of imputations and insinuations", he said while responding to a question on the Vadra-DLF deals at the Economic Editors' Conference here.

 

Civil rights activist Arvind Kejriwal had demanded an inquiry into business dealings between Vadra and his companies and real estate giant DLF.

 

Kejriwal had alleged that DLF gave interest free loan of Rs65 crore to Vadra. The company as well as Vadra had denied the allegations.

 

Chidambaram said he "could not respond (on the issue) on behalf of the government because that is not the issue here. I think those who made their allegations have made their statement, the company concerned has made a statement and the individual concerned has made a statement".

 

Vadra had earlier dismissed Kejriwal's allegations as "utterly false and defamatory" saying that his business transactions were "fully reflected" in financial statements before government authorities in compliance with the law.

 

DLF too had rejected the allegations that it had given unsecured loans to Vadra as a 'quid pro quo' for favours and said it had transparent dealing with him as an individual entrepreneur.

 

Kejriwal had alleged that besides an interest free loan of Rs65 crore, DLF gave properties worth Rs300 crore to Vadra at throwaway prices.

User

COMMENTS

MOHAN

4 years ago

Right to Incommunication (RTI)?

You may ask any number of questions to Manmohan and members of G-family about their wrong doing, inefficiency, corruption, and also probity and accountability , they are just incommunicative to questionings.

It is the RTI of G-Gang !

REPLY

NSriramamurty

In Reply to MOHAN 4 years ago

by RTI,we can not obtain Private People's Information without Consent of Concerned-who will never give consent.Only Govt.Dept's have Powers to Demand / Verify Private Records including their Computers / Lockers / Money Flow in their Accounts. THUS PRELIMINARY Enquiry is a Must for Meaningful / Careful Allegations .Then only Corruption can be Controlled-due to fear factor for illegal money grabbing.As one Reader Questioned-Why DLF gives Rs.65 Crores Loan Interest FREE-while it is in Financial Trouble with Heavy Debts paying 22% Interest PA.It is coming out of its Financial Problems getting Required Favours from Govt.People.Chidambaram is not Home Minister controlling CBI-do not have any duty to Deny it-He Denied only to Please Sonia Gandhi.

MOHAN

In Reply to MOHAN 4 years ago

.

It is also a fact that our journalists never ask tough questions to G-Family!

M G WARRIER

4 years ago

FM is right here. Where is the hurry? And compared to stories of plundering of thousands of crores surfacing in ‘official’ reports which are also being dodged and ‘defended’ with counter allegations, these are too small amounts to be taken cognizance of. Let us hope someone brings forth some allegations involving some decent amounts and in a manner acceptable to FM.

REPLY

NSriramamurty

In Reply to M G WARRIER 4 years ago

It Looks as if you are Asking INDIANS to do the work of Investigating Agencies-even though they do not have any Powers to do it-except RTI,which is in Bud stage now-without giving any informations on Powerful Lobby People and taking Years together to give very little information.

M G WARRIER

In Reply to NSriramamurty 4 years ago

Sorry, Sriramamurty, if I confused you! I was expressing the helplessness of the Indian in a different way. In this case, FM has no mandate to defend the person against whom some allegations are made. That person and the DLF are strong enough to defend themselves. But the entire ‘establishment’ has come out. Many who have views in support of IAC are claiming shelter under anonymity when they speak to media. Many refuse to express their views. What is going on?

NSriramamurty

4 years ago

DLF is Public Ltd. Company with Millions of Shareholders Money invested in it.In AP,in Jagan Mohan Reddy's case also,Govt. or Concerned Govt.Depts includind Income-Tax Dept.,Anti Corruption dept. Only PIL in High Court made Anti-Corruption Dept. Attached his Properties for Rs. 51 Crores and CBI says in Supreme Court that Rs.Thosands of Crores Frauds will be Booked by it & Charge Sheets filed.On Jagan's Appeal for Staying CBI's enquiry,SC said that Let Preliminary Enquiry be Over ,based on which Further Action to be done can be Considered.SC refused Bail to him for 3 more Months. IT is also QUID PRO Case only as Warda's.GOI or Delhi Govt. shoud ask for PRELIMINARY ENQUIRY from CBI & Income Tax Dept. Govt. is Callosius vis-a-vis our Judiciary.

Why Sensex is not the barometer of the Indian economy

The Sensex does not seem to represent the Indian economy correctly. The index needs to be made more broad-based in terms of number of companies and sectors. Also emerging companies should be adequately represented in Sensex, so as to reflect the Indian economy fully

How do you gauge the mood of stock market in India? How do you decide whether things are hunky-dory or depressing in the stock market?  How do you take a call to make an entry into the market or exit out of it? Though the answers to all these questions are not very easy, one very obvious parameter which gives a good understanding with respect to these questions is to look at the ‘Sensex’ and its movements. The Sensex has always been termed as the barometer of the economy and no wonder daily analysis of the stock market for business news channels starts with a mention of movement in the Sensex and ends with the same as well. Sensex commands the same position in the stock market which ‘Xerox’ has in the photo copy business and ‘Bisleri’ has for mineral water. This is say that if we treat Sensex as a brand then it has a very strong brand recall. But does ‘Sensex’ indeed reflect the mood of the stock market and is it indeed barometer of the Indian economy? Do we indeed need to follow ‘Sensex’ the way we do it?
 

Let us look at some interesting facts to understand certain limitations which Sensex has as an index. These limitations can be classified as follows:
 

Sensex movement is extremely sensitive to 6 companies:  Sensex is made of 30 companies representing different sectors of the economy. But the fact is that six companies alone can easily alter the movement of the index and give us false impression of market movement in general. Let us look at the data Sensex data in this connection:


It is very obvious that because of the dominant representation of the top six companies in the Sensex, the much-tracked index becomes extremely sensitive to price movement of these companies. Do these six companies mirror Indian economy? Not really.

Surprisingly two out of these six companies are from one corporate house only i.e. HDFC. If 14% of an index is one corporate house of the economy, then it goes on to show how the Sensex can easily get influenced by a decision making activity of this corporate house, though it may not be intentional. It is understood that the Sensex is built on free market capital capitalization method which gives representation to stocks broadly based on their market capitalization but had the Sensex been more broad-based, this shortcoming would have been removed.

 

Sensex has skewed sectoral representation: Like dominance of certain stocks having the ability to influence the Sensex movement, sectoral representation in the Sensex also looks skewed. Let us look at the data below for sectoral representation of the stocks in the Sensex.

Finance, Oil & Gas and IT have around 50% weightage in the Sensex. Issue is not with only skewed sectoral distribution, but also the fact these sectors are extremely sensitive in terms of price movement and provide undesirable volatility to the index. History shows us that the financial sector has been extremely sensitive to monetary policy, oil and gas to international crude prices and IT to foreign exchange movement. The Sensex volatility exposes investors to portfolio risk in case they try to replicate the Sensex in their portfolio.
 

Sensex does not capture the mood of change in economy correctly:  If you look at the way stocks have been included and excluded from the Sensex since June 2006, you get an idea that inclusions and exclusions are not always based on logic. How can one explain the fact that Sun Pharma, which was included in Sensex on 12 January 2009, was excluded on 3May 2010 and was again included on 8August 2011? Inclusions and exclusions should not be so frequent in any index, especially considering that an index like the Sensex is often projected as an index which measures barometer of the Indian economy.
 

Additionally, several stocks have been making a come back in the Sensex frequently. Out of 15 stocks which have been excluded from the Sensex post June 2006, six have made a comeback in Sensex which is clearly evident from the table below.

If stocks make such frequent come back in the index, won’t it be fair to say that the index is not capturing the mood of the economy correctly. Ideally new stocks which reflect the emerging economy should also be included in the Sensex by making it more broad-based.
 

Usage of Sensex can be manipulated by fund managers:  Many fund managers use the Sensex as the benchmark index for measuring and showing performance of schemes of their funds. These schemes do not replicate stocks in the index, barring cases of index funds which have stocks almost in the same pattern as the index.  It is very easy for fund managers to manipulate the performance of their schemes operating against the Sensex because of limitations such as skewed distribution of the sectors and stocks in the Sensex. It is a different story that many of fund managers still find it difficult to beat the benchmark index.
 

The Sensex does not seem to represent the Indian economy correctly. The movement in the Sensex often misrepresents the behavior of the Indian economy in general and stock market in particular. The index needs to be made more broad-based in terms of number of companies and sectors. Also emerging companies should be adequately represented in Sensex.

 

 

User

COMMENTS

Shekhar

4 years ago

If the writer feels that Sensex needs to be more "broad-based", why doesn't he suggest changes to it (specifically in which stocks should be included, which to be excluded, how the weightages should be changed, etc)

Writing such articles is easy; pointing out shortcomings in others views is easy. What makes a difference is - if you are able to suggest specific actionable changes & give adequate justification for your ideas. You should convince others or get convinced.

My suggestion for changes in Sensex (with justification): Telecom as a sector is under-represented. One way of choosing industry weightages for Sensex could be that industry's contribution to the country's GDP (& not the market capitalization). Other more intelligent readers can comment on the same.

Regards,
shekhar

REPLY

Guramandeep Singh

In Reply to Shekhar 4 years ago

Dear Shekhar,

If pointing out shortcomings was that easy, I wonder why they haven't been pointed out earlier. I believe that this article was very apt at the issue it wanted to raise. The issue being an opinion as to why the Sensex does not adequately represent the Indian Economy.

It is a similar issue to talking about how bad our political environment is, but then again I have not seen everybody start a political party. As much as I like your pro-activeness at suggesting a solution, I do not agree with your comment about not having a discussion about a problem unless you have a solution to it. I believe that unless we acknowledge and accept an issue, we will not be in the right frame of mind to suggest a solution.

Vivek:

I loved this article and the the issue you have brought forth. I hope more of us take notice and urge the regulators to do something about this.

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