Cairn agrees to lower Vedanta deal value by Rs3,800 crore

Cairn Energy will sell its 40% stake in its Indian arm to Vedanta at Rs355 per share instead of Rs405 a share agreed in August last year. It will now get gross proceeds of Rs27,007 crore (about $6.02 billion) instead of Rs30,811 crore ($6.84 billion) it was initially expecting

New Delhi: In the first indication of Cairn Energy Plc’s willingness to accept government’s conditions for selling its Indian unit to Vedanta Resources, the Edinburgh- based firm yesterday agreed to lower the sale price by over Rs3,800 crore, reports PTI.

Cairn Energy will sell its 40% stake in Cairn India to Vedanta at Rs355 per share instead of Rs405 a share agreed in August last year. It will now get gross proceeds of Rs27,007 crore (about $6.02 billion) instead of Rs30,811 crore ($6.84 billion) it was initially expecting.

“Cairn and Vedanta have agreed to certain adjustments to the transaction sale and purchase agreement for the sale of part of Cairn Energy Plc’s shareholding in Cairn India, involving the removal of the non-compete arrangements and associated fee,” the two firms said in separate statements.

The Scottish explorer has for the past 10 months denied need for government approval to what it called a corporate transaction. It also rejected both the requirement of nod and pre-emption of partner Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC), which holds stake in 8 out of 10 properties of Cairn India including the crown-jewel Rajasthan block.

The government has refused to give its approval to the deal which was initially valued at $9.6 billion (including the mandatory open offer Vedanta Group had to make to minority shareholders of Cairn India) unless Cairn agreed to the requirement of partner consent.

Cairn and its successor have to agree to making royalty ONGC pays on entire crude output from Rajasthan despite owning only 30%, as recoverable from sale of oil. ONGC had cited provisions of the contract months before the deal was announced, to demand that royalty be made cost recoverable.

A Group of Ministers (GoM) headed by finance minister Pranab Mukherjee last month decided to make cost recovery of royalty and Cairn India agreeing to pay Rs2,500 per ton cess on its 70% share in Rajasthan as preconditions for the government consent for the deal.

Both the conditions had material impact on the deal and Cairn Energy on Monday announcing that it is willing to forego Rs50 per share non-compete fee it was charging Vedanta, indicated its willingness to accept these conditions for the sake of the deal.

The GoM’s recommendations are to go to the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs for approval later this week.

Cairn said the transaction will now take place in two tranches: Cairn Energy will sell 10% out of its 62.2% stake in Cairn India by 11th July and another 30% upon receipt of the government approval.

But will selling a 10% stake without government permission not violate production sharing contract (PSC) is to be seen.

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Inflation a major problem for Indian economy: FM

Finance ministry Pranab Mukherjee, addressing a meeting of Indian and American corporate leaders, think-tank members and policymakers in Washington said, “We do not believe, one is to be dispensed for the other. Yes, we can have a moderate rate of inflation and at the same time, reasonable developed growth. The monetary and fiscal policy must move in tandem. In India, we are doing so”

Washington: Finance minister Pranab Mukherjee on Monday said inflation poses a major challenge to the Indian economy and projected that the rate of inflation is going to be more than 6.5% this year, reports PTI.

“There are problems (with the Indian economy) and one of the major problems is inflation,” Mr Mukherjee said, addressing a meeting of Indian and American corporate leaders, think-tank members and policymakers at a conference on the ‘US-India Economic and Financial Partnership’ jointly organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) and Brookings Institute, a Washington-based think-tank.

“Inflationary pressure is putting a serious constraint,” said the finance minister, who arrived in Washington on Monday leading a high-powered Indian delegation for the second India-US Economic and Financial Partnership discussions being held here.

“We do not believe, in theory, one is to be dispensed for the other. Yes, we can have a moderate rate of inflation and at the same time, reasonable developed growth. The monetary and fiscal policy must move in tandem. In India, we are doing so,” he said.

“Therefore, in the short term, I would like to emphasis that in India, the growth potential is there. The rate of saving and rate of investment is reasonably high. The various structural reforms which we have undertaken and which will come in course of time, that will ensure that investment-friendly environment which can attract investment from various parts of the world,” he said.

Referring to concerns expressed by various quarters about undesirable blips in economic data from time to time, Mr Mukherjee said, “Sometimes questions have been raised, particularly looking at a figure in a short campus of time.

(For example) Whether foreign institutional investment (FII) in the current financial year is slowing down. Every year, the first quarter FII investment slows down, particularly in equity. But in the later part of the year, it makes up. This is not in one year, but year after year. Therefore, we need not be unnecessarily overly worried.”

Inflation, Mr Mukherjee reiterated, is an important constraint to India’s economic growth, which the government has to tackle.

“To be very frank, what shall be acceptable and what can be a tolerable level of inflation is very difficult to define.

But in our economy, we feel that if we can keep the inflationary pressure within 5% to 6%, it could be ideal, but we can live with 6% to 6.5%,” he said.

“This year I do hope it will be a little more, not because of near supply constraints on the agricultural front, which was one of the major reasons for inflationary pressure of the previous and current year, which we have substantially addressed by taking appropriate measures,” he said.

“But international commodity prices, including food and fuel, is causing severe constraints,” he said.

“The food prices have started coming down. We have taken steps very recently. And have reduced subsidy burden by adjusting the price of oil and also providing relief to the consumers by doing away with central taxes and appealing to provincial governments to reduce their taxes on petroleum and petroleum products. I do have hope that it will have some impact. But this is going to be a major problem and it would have its impact on the overall growth scenario,” Mr Mukherjee said.

User

Renault Fluence: Injustice to a good brand

What was required was some extremely tastefully done advertising, as if the car was a classic wine or a master writer’s book. The promise of status is a given, the ad had to go many levels beyond that

Renault has come to India. And it's a bloody expensive car. I don't even want to know the price; I might end up in a cardiac ICU. But it's safe to assume the brand is meant only for the richie rich of the country. And amongst them, the very educated, world travelled, auto aware bada sahibs. A farmer from Sangli may have the money to buy a Renault, but surely it's not targeted at him, as the man may not be in the know of, or in a position to appreciate the brand's glorious heritage.

Keeping this context in mind, I watched Renault Fluence's advert with great expectation. That one will enjoy a really classy ad, an ad that will leave you craving for more. My theory was that since the buyer of this brand would be very aware of what Renault stands for and what it brings to the table, there would be no need to do the standard car advertising; that here was a chance to do really rich creative work. And I must say I am left disappointed and saddened, because the commercial is ordinary and run-of-the-mill stuff.

The television commercial opens with a young, hip couple leaving some kind of a la-di-da party. The host, a pompous middle-aged gent, walks them to their car. Along the way, the chap boasts of his many assets-his pricey paintings, sculptures, carpets, and his vintage cars. And each time he throws the age of the artifact at the couple. Finally, they reach the Renault Fluence. And the boaster is left stunned and tongue-tied. This time it's the turn of the young couple to puff their chests up, as they zip off in the gaadi.

Superb commercial, for Toyota Innova. Or Volkswagen Vento. Or Hyundai Verna. Or Maruti Baleno. Or any sedan/SUV for that matter. Where was the need to try soooo hard to convince the audience on the 'status' of owning a Renault? The target buyers already know it, else they would not be the consumers of the brand! In short, the advertiser is preaching to the converted. And in the process, has put out a very tired car ad, one that will only degrade the cult status of the car.

What was required was some extremely tastefully done advertising, as if the car was a classic wine or a master writer's book. The promise of status is a given, the ad had to go many levels beyond that.

A great opportunity lost. This sort of an ad might just appeal to the loaded Sangli farmer. Maybe he's the one Renault is targeting. Sad.

User

COMMENTS

ss

6 years ago

Wow I am really looking forward to reading a positive article from this guy!
ASS!

Venu Mohan Madhavan

6 years ago

The problem is not with the ad. It is with 'what' image R wants to create in India < where it is a relatively unknown brand among the new generation > With its earlier model R almost positioned itself as a Fleet Taxi car. Now what ? I don't know anything about the DNA of the brand...what does it stand for...Technology... Sturdiness...styling....some PR is needed.

AK

6 years ago

Ah dude, Mr Thakraney, you really ought to have checked on the car's price. No, you would not be in an ICU, nor would you have written such a laughable assault on the ad.

The car is priced at Rs 13 to 15 lakh. So not too far away from say an Innova, you see. This is certainly not a Maybach or even a BMW.

Alok

6 years ago

The author makes it sound as if Renault is some kind of rare super-luxury brand like Bentley or Maserati. In truth, it competes with Volkswagen, Ford, Toyota, Honda, Fiat, Vauxhall, etc in the European market. The Fluence is a Rs 10-12 lakh car, so I'm pretty sure you won't end up in an ICU. I think a basic knowledge of motoring and car brands should be a pre-requisite when writing such an article. Sadly, the author seems not to meet this criterion. Bad article!

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