Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Brush your teeth twice a day and revitalise your heart
New Delhi : What have brushing and cleaning your teeth to do with your heart? A lot, say health experts, suggesting that taking care of your teeth and gums will not only help keep oral hygiene or make you smile better but also save your heart from various heart diseases.
 
Gum disease can be a reason for heart disease because bacteria from infected gums can dislodge, enter the bloodstream, attach to blood vessels and increase clot formation.
 
"Swelling caused by gum disease may also trigger clot formation. Clots decrease blood flow to the heart, thereby causing an elevation in blood pressure and increasing the risk of a heart attack", said Dr Subhash Chandra, chairman (cardiology) at BLK Super Speciality Hospital in the capital.
 
Dr Chandra recently treated Neelam, an 18-year-old girl who was diagnosed with endocarditis (suffering from leaking heart valve). The infection in her heart valves was caused by mouth bacteria.
 
Endocarditis is an infection of the heart's valves or inner lining. It occurs when germs get into the bloodstream and settle inside the heart, often on a valve.
 
The infection is usually caused by bacteria but in rare cases it is seen to be caused by fungi.
 
Not brushing the teeth increases the bacterial count in the mouth which can travel to the damaged heart valves to cause infection.
 
Many of the risk factors for gum disease are the same as those for heart disease, such as tobacco use, poor nutrition and diabetes.
 
Overall, people who have chronic gum disease are at higher risk for a heart attack. The people with moderate or advanced gum (periodontal) disease are more likely to have heart disease than those with healthy gums.
 
There are two groups - namely coronary heart disease and infection in heart valves - in which the effect of poor oral health can be studied. Poor oral healthcare increases the risk of coronary heart diseases.
 
"Poor oral health increases the risk of infection in heart valves, especially in case of pre-existing damage in the heart valve. With such a condition, the infection due to poor oral health can reach to the already damaged heart valves, causing an infection there too." explained Dr Tapan Ghosh, director (cardiology sciences) at Paras Hospitals, Gurgaon.
 
Brushing your teeth twice a day is a mandate to maintain good oral healthcare. It is always advisable to go for a regular dental checkup in order to maintain a good oral health.
 
"One of the biggest mouth-heart connections is related to gum disease. The spread of infected bacteria by swollen and bleeding gums not only destroys the structure of teeth jawbones but can also cause heart attack," the experts cautioned.
 
Gum disease which is called "gingivitis" in its early stages and periodontal disease in the late stages is caused by plaque build-up along and below the gum line.
 
"Apart from heart attack, poor oral health hygiene may result in various serious health consequences as respiratory infections, diabetes, poor nutrition, osteoporosis and stomach disease like gastro-intestinal infection, H Pylori, gastritis and stomach cancer," added Dr Ramesh Garg, head (gastroenterology) at Saroj Super Speciality Hospital in Delhi.
 
So next time when you ignore brushing your teeth, hear the voice of your heart!
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Pan masala ads featuring celebrities violates ASCI code
ASCI says it will investigate advertisements by pan masala brands featuring celebrities as these would be in violation of its code of self-regulation in advertising content
 
Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI) says advertisements by Pan Masala brands featuring celebrities are in violation of its Code of Self-Regulation and the Council will investigate such advertisements.
 
"We would like to educate the consumers and the advertisers that while products like Pan Masala and Supari are not banned for sale or from advertising by law, the ASCI code does not permit the use of celebrities in advertisements of products which by law require health warning on its pack or cannot be purchased or used by minors. Complaints against such advertisements have been received by ASCI and are being looked into. ASCI will approach the concerned advertisers to take necessary corrective action post decision by our Consumer Complaints Council," says Shweta Purandare, Secretary General, ASCI, in a release.
 
Recently, the Health Department of Delhi Government, taking cognizance of the serious health consequences of pan masalas and the significant influence their advertisements featuring celebrities, which have an negative influence on minors made.  The Health Department also made an appeal to celebrities not to appear in such products' ads.
 
According to the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) Rules and Regulation, the statutory warnings like 'Chewing of Pan Masala is injurious to health' and 'Chewing of Supari is injurious to health' are mandatory to be printed on the pack as well as for the advertisements. 
 
The Council said, it has been observed that large number of Pan Masala brands are in potential contravention of the advertising codes under ASCI's Chapter III (To safeguard against the indiscriminate use of Advertising in situations or of the Promotion of Products which are regarded as Hazardous or Harmful to society or to individuals, particularly minors, to a degree or of a type which is Unacceptable to Society at Large). 
 
More specifically, Clause 2 (e) under Chapter III states:
Advertisements should not feature personalities from the field of sports, music and cinema for products which, by law, either require a health warning in their advertising or cannot be purchased by minors.
 
It is important that the advertisers as well as celebrities are aware of this clause of ASCI code and sensitized to this issue so that they can advertise in a responsible manner, the self-regulating body said.
 

User

When Govt prints, circulates and burns faulty notes worth Rs30,000 crore
The Nashik Security Press has reportedly burnt 30 crore currency notes of Rs1,000 denomination that had no security thread!
 
The Nashik unit of Indian Security Press (ISP), owned by state-run Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India (SPMCIL), has reportedly burnt 30 crore faulty notes with a denomination of Rs1,000. This has led to the suspension of five employees, including a manager and deputy manager at SPMCIL's Hoshangabad (Madhya Pradesh) unit. 
 
According to reports, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) through the Government of India (GoI) had placed an order with the Press to print 50 crore notes of Rs1,000 denomination. After receiving paper with security features from SPMCIL's paper mill, the ISP printed about 30 crore notes. The RBI, after receiving these notes from the ISP, distributed about 20 crore notes to several banks. 
 
However, some people complained to RBI about the missing security thread in these new notes. Few also pointed out the upside down watermark image of Mahatma Gandhi on these notes. The Rs1,000 currency notes have a readable, windowed security thread, alternately visible on the obverse with the inscriptions ‘Bharat’ (in Hindi), ‘1000’ and ‘RBI’, but totally embedded on the reverse.
 
The RBI then reported this matter to SMPMCIL, whose chairman and managing director MS Rana, set up a three-member enquiry committee.
 
The Committee headed by TR Gowda, former general manager of ISP's Nashik unit and current in-charge of Hoshangabad unit of SPMCIL, submitted its report. This was followed by suspension of two officials, SR Vajpayee, manager and Ravindra Singh, deputy manager of SMPCIL's Hoshangabad unit. Three employees from ISP, Nashik were also suspended while six supervisors were issued a show cause notice, media reports say.
 
However, Press Majdoor Sangh, the employee union at Nashik, went on an agitation. On Tuesday, the union, detained Sandeep Jain, general manager of ISP, Nashik for the entire day. According to the union, no employee from Nashik is responsible for printing of faulty currency notes, as there was a fault with the security paper itself. However, the action was taken at the Finance Ministry-level and not at ISP-level, Jain had reportedly told the union leaders.
 
In an email reply, an official from RBI, said the matter relates with CNP Nashik, which can provide the answers. The CNP NAshik is not under the central bank's control, the official added.
 
RBI along with the Indian government is responsible for the design, production and overall management of the nation's currency, with an aim to ensure adequate supply of clean and genuine notes.
 
There are four printing presses that print and supply currency notes to the RBI. These are located at Dewas in Madhya Pradesh, Nashik in Maharashtra, Mysore in Karnataka, and Salboni in West Bengal. The Dewas and Nashik units are owned by SPMCIL, while Mysore and Salboni presses are owned by Bharatiya Reserve Bank Note Mudran Private Limited (BRBNMPL), a wholly owned subsidiary of the RBI.
 
The Indian government mints coins, which are distributed by the RBI.

User

COMMENTS

Dr Anantha K Ramdas

10 months ago

Interesting comments on the faulty notes and crores spent in "burning" these notes.

Can somebody recommend a suitable, reliable astrologer with track records to the RBI that they must now expedite the issue of polymer currency notes to replace the paper currency, by consulting him?

We have been talking of polymer currency notes; how in selected cities Rs 10 notes were being "market tested"; how these will outlast paper currency notes by several years; how more than 25 countries have benefited by this switch over and yet we have no firm commitment from Government when they will make the change. On the top of this, fake/counterfeit currency notes made in Pakistan have been smuggled into the country and trying the very best to ruin our economy.

Sacking a few guys just won't do; put them in jail for their lifetime and find out the left-out moles in the security press!

MG Warrier

10 months ago

I agree with Jayaram's view. Media headlines including here, which mention notes worth Rs30,000 crore sends out a wrong alarm. It looks, the defective 'printed paper' was destroyed. Lapses need to be looked into, which reportedly the press is doing. The paper becomes 'currency' only when it is issued from RBI.

REPLY

Akshay Kini

In Reply to MG Warrier 10 months ago

If it was only security paper I wonder how banks reported the descripency. Once the RBI sends it to banks it is currency.

MG Warrier

In Reply to Akshay Kini 10 months ago

From what I read in this story, I quote "The Nashik unit of Indian Security Press (ISP), owned by state-run Security Printing and Minting Corporation of India (SPMCIL), has reportedly burnt 30 crore faulty notes with a denomination of Rs1,000. This has led to the suspension of five employees, including a manager and deputy manager at SPMCIL's Hoshangabad (Madhya Pradesh) unit."
my understanding is that what was burnt had not reached RBI from the press. I have not separately verified facts. If you have, please share information.

P Jayaram

10 months ago

Granted, the paper received was faulty, the matter should have been found out during the incoming inspection of the faulty paper.Serious oversight and quality lapse. Procedures need to be strengthened.

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)