Bharti Airtel submits bid for 3G spectrum

The government is selling three slots of spectrum across the nation with the exception of a few states where four slots will be on offer. The reserve price for pan-India spectrum has been fixed at Rs3,500 crore

India's largest private telecom company Bharti Airtel Ltd on Thursday submitted its bid for 3G spectrum, the auction for which starts from 9th April, reports PTI.

According to the schedule, tomorrow is the last day for putting in applications to participate in the auction.

The government is selling three slots of spectrum across the nation with the exception of a few states where four slots will be on offer. The reserve price for pan-India spectrum has been fixed at Rs3,500 crore.

According to the notice inviting applications (NIA) for 3G spectrum auction, of the 22 circles only five states—Punjab, Bihar, West Bengal, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir—will have four private players.

3G mobile services will allow high-speed content download and broadband services. When contacted, Bharti officials confirmed that an application has been put in for participating in the forthcoming 3G spectrum auction.

The successful bidders would be allowed to offer 3G services on a commercial basis from 1 September 2010.

The auction of spectrum has been postponed several times as there was indecisiveness over the availability of spectrum and the number of operators to be allowed in each circle.

The Department of Telecom (DoT) was at loggerheads with the defence ministry over the latter's reluctance to vacate the designated spectrum (air waves) for commercial use.

As per DoT's schedule, the last date for submission of applications is 19th March. The mock auction will take place on 5th and 6th April, followed by the final auction on 9 April 2010.

According to sources, Bharti Airtel will be bidding for a pan-India spectrum.

Other potential operators, including Vodafone-Essar, Tata Teleservices Ltd, Aircel and Reliance Communications Ltd are also likely to put in their applications by tomorrow.

The government expects to garner Rs35,000 crore from the sale of spectrum for 3G and Boradband Wireless Access (BWA). However, with the number of players reduced to three in most of the circles from the four planned earlier, the government may fall short of its target.


SNEHA: Helping mothers for child care

SNEHA is an organisation that offers friendship and help to young mothers and children to eradicate malnutrition and infant mortality

From their experience of saving the lives of newborn babies…

From healing the physical wounds of battered women…

And wondering what happened to them once they went back to the environment from which they came… was born an organisation which offers friendship and support.

Every Wednesday, a group of doctors would meet in Dharavi (one of Asia’s biggest slums) and discuss how to help mothers and reduce infant mortality and malnutrition. They included Dr Armida Fernandez, a neonatologist and former dean of Lokmanya Tilak Municipal General Hospital and Medical College, Mumbai and Dr Soans. While Dr Fernandez wanted to set up a structure to offer help, Dr Soans offered to finance it. The sudden demise of Dr Soans may have been a setback, but his wife Patricia decided to fulfil her husband's wish and provided the seed capital to start SNEHA.

SNEHA was born in the Mumbai slum of Dharavi on 27 November 1999—the perfect destination to help address the special needs of nutrition, health and education of women and children, especially newborns, but offering quality and standardised healthcare. The need for Sneha is evident in the statistics.

One out of two children in India is malnourished; 54% of Mumbaikars live in slums and 450 mothers out of every 100,000 die during childbirth. Dr Fernandez was to change these numbers. SNEHA works with poor women to help them understand basics of personal hygiene, importance of breastfeeding, nutrition for expectant mothers and babies. The work begins with adolescent girls, who are told about the ill-effects of early marriage and motherhood. Expectant mothers are also contacted through house visits and group counselling, given lessons in first aid and taught how to help out during childbirth. These activities are conducted under a programme called ‘City Initiative for Newborn Health’.

SNEHA encourages women to work within their ecosystem by using Appreciative Inquiry, a process that explores the power of sharing success stories and positivism. It encourages individuals to look for possible solutions and facilitates behavioural change in a process that has positively changed many lives. Such counselling is offered across its 30 facilities.

In the area of child health and nutrition, SNEHA has initiatives like ‘Aahar’ and ‘Nutrition Day Care Centres’ to deal with child nutrition. Mothers are made aware of nutrition and dietary changes which don’t deviate drastically from the family’s food habits. There is also regular screening to identify children with congenital heart disease and to provide medical assistance. 

SNEHA also offers counselling and rehabilitation to victims of domestic violence. Even today, 66% of women face physical & mental harassment in their own homes. These women are encouraged to share their trauma through counselling and group therapy. In most cases, the first step is to get all the parties involved together and interact. If communication doesn’t help, then SNEHA’s volunteers help the woman file a police complaint and take the matter forward.

SNEHA also provides regular health services through OPDs, and also offers holistic healthcare to senior citizens. It encourages senior citizens and young girls to attend activities held at its centres, which also conduct social, recreational and skills-oriented activities and vocational training. These life skills are aimed at helping them earn higher incomes to support themselves and their families.

SNEHA's activities are funded through donations, corporate sponsorship and fund-raising events. Like most NGOs, it requires monetary support as well as volunteers in order to expand its work, especially in the areas of preventing transmission of HIV/AIDS from mother to child, and sexual harassment at work, for women living in slums.

SNEHA is registered as a voluntary organisation, under the Bombay Public Trust Act, 1950. Contributions are eligible for exemption under the Income Tax Act and the Foreign Contributions Regulation Act for overseas donations. You can help SNEHA by contacting it at the address below:

Urban Health Centre, 4th floor,
60 Feet Road, Dharavi,
Mumbai 400017
Telephone: 24042627/24086011




7 years ago

Dear Chairperson Sneha,
I've witnessed the good work you are doing in the slum areas of Santacruz and Dharavi.
Just wanted to wish you good luck!

Gregg Tully

7 years ago

Dear Aparna Ramchandra,

Thank you for this excellent article. SNEHA is a very impressive organization. In Nepal, the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation (NYOF) has rescued close to 5000 children from severe malnourishment, while educating their mothers to provide nutritious food for their families.

NYOF builds Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes (NRHs), small home-like hospitals, throughout Nepal. A malnourished child and their mother live at an NRH for an average of five weeks. During this time, the NRH staff restores the child to health, including treating any medical problems they have. The child’s mother is trained to properly care for her entire family, and she is taught to share this knowledge with her friends and neighbors when she returns home. As a result, the impact of this pioneering program spreads throughout villages all across Nepal.

Last year, NYOF’s Nutritional Homes treated more than 1000 malnourished children, and provided free health exams to more than 5000 impoverished people at outreach camps.

I’m the development director of NYOF and can send you background information about our pioneering Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes. I can also provide photos and arrange interviews with our staff in Nepal.

Take care,
Gregg Tully
[email protected]
Tel: +1 415-331-8585

Food inflation eases, but fuel prices keep up pressure

The easing in food prices has been marred by rising fuel inflation, giving no respite to the overall inflation level that has been consistently rising since it came out of sub-zero levels in September last year

Food inflation fell to 16.3% for the week ended 6th March on easing prices of pulses and vegetables, but fuel inflation shot up to 12.68%, reports PTI.

For the previous week, food inflation was at 17.8% and fuel inflation at 11.4%.

Vegetable prices showed a marked decline of more than 10% over the week, followed by about 4% fall in prices of pulses. Urad and arhar prices were down 6% each during the week.

However, the easing in food prices has been marred by rising fuel inflation, giving no respite to the overall inflation level that has been consistently rising since it came out of sub-zero levels in September last year.

The fuel index comprising fuel, power, light and lubricants saw an inflation of 12.68% over the week led by 16.8% inflation in petrol prices and 14.99% in diesel prices.

The rise in fuel prices is a result of the budgetary announcement of a hike in excise and customs duty on petrol and diesel.

Overall inflation has risen to 9.89% for February from a low of 1.34% in October last year, primarily led by high food prices.

Inflation has already breached the RBI's projection of 8.5% for the fiscal-end in January when it touched 8.56%.


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