Citizens' Issues
'Ban Indian doctors from wearing white coats'
Banning Indian doctors and medical students from wearing long-sleeved white coats could reduce the spread of infections in hospitals, says a new study.
 
"Long sleeved coats spread infection and lead to avoidable harm and cost to patients," said Edmond Fernandes, a postgraduate at Yenepoya Medical College in Bengaluru.
 
"Every hospital should have a committee to check and respond to hospital acquired infections," he added.
 
"But an easy win would be for India's ministry of health to ban doctors and medical students from wearing white coats, to reduce the harm and cost that results from hospital acquired infections," Fernandes said in the study published in the journal The BMJ.
 
"Although long sleeved white coats have traditionally been worn by doctors since the 19th century, we now know that white coats harbour potential contaminants and contribute considerably to the burden of disease acquired in hospital by spreading infection," Fernandes added.
 
He said that in India, changing areas in hospitals are rare because of space constraints, so white coats are commonly worn by students coming from college and outside the hospital. They are also often left on chairs, tables, and in corridors.
 
He added that in many cities in India some junior doctors are also now seen wearing white coats in shopping malls and cinemas too, and then they enter sterile zones in the hospital in the same attire.
 
"Given India's tropical climate, common sense indicates that we should discourage wearing white coats that are washed perhaps only every few weeks," Fernandes said.
 
In 2007, the United Kingdom took the landmark decision to ban long sleeved white coats - and that in 2009, the American Medical Association wanted to follow suit and dump the white coats, "but the proposal was dismissed because clinicians wanted to keep their traditional gowns", he said.
 
"White coats are mere symbolism and wearing them does not itself confer status or professionalism," Fernandes added.
 
"Dressing presentably and sporting a smile are more important than white coats and that institutions should give every medical student and doctor a recognisable name badge to wear," he said.

User

COMMENTS

Narendra Doshi

2 years ago

seems surprisingly true.

Shrikant Shenoy

2 years ago

Heard about the white coat syndrome?

Bangalore Club questions eviction order
Bangalore Club, a 147-year-old landmark in the city where British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was once a member when a junior army officer, is facing a eviction threat but asserted it will contest it.
 
"We too heard that an order to vacate the premises in seven days was issued by assistant commissioner, revenue department, Mahesh Babu though we are yet to receive it," club secretary K.D. Murthy told IANS.
 
The eviction order to vacate the 13-acre sprawling area, valued at crores of rupees, was issued on the recommendation of the state legislative committee, which went into the ownership of the land located in the city centre.
 
"We have recently filed a writ petition in the Karnataka High Court challenging a notice by the revenue department asking us to prove the land ownership," Murthy said.
 
The club also submitted a copy of its title deed (khata), encumbrance certificate, property tax receipts and other documents showing the club is the owner of the land since the 19th century.
 
Set up as the Bangalore United Services Club in the tradition of the colonial clubs for officers of the British empire, Churchill used to frequent it during his stint in India in 1896.
 
In 1946, the premise was opened to civilians and was rechristened Bangalore Club. Its stately central building blends the idea and grandeur of the Raj and its resplendent Mysore room and the Gentlemen's Bar preserve its antiquity.
 
Early this month, the club lost its liquor licence after its renewal application was rejected by the Bengaluru Urban district office.
 
"Our liquor license was cancelled on July 2 and our stock of alcohol was seized on July 3 by the excise department," club president G.V. Radhakrishna said.

User

COMMENTS

SuchindranathAiyerS

2 years ago

India always reminds me of "He fell among thieves" by Sir Henry Newbolt rather than "Where the head is held high" by Sir Rabindranath Tagore. For India is a Nation of thieves. If India can survive having had Pratibha Patil or Pranab Mukherji as President of India and Robert Vadra as a Z-Class Security VIP with chaps like S.M. Krishna as Foreign Minister, Honest Antony as Defence Minister, Praful Patel as Civil Aviation Minister, Sharad Pawar as Agricultural Minister, P. Chidambaram as Finance Minister, P,J, Kurien as Dy Speaker of the Rajya Sabha and there are brazen proposals to have Rahul Baba as the leader of the Opposition, Just check out the History of persons in crucial positions since the very beginning. Jawaharlal Nehru, V.K.Krishna Menon, TT Krishnamachari, Vijayalakshmi Pandit, B.R.Ambedkar, Indira Gandhi, Rajiv Gandhi, the list is legion of those who contributed their mite to India falling to 135 out of 172 countries (and below Sub-Saharan Africa) in the Global Human and Social Development Index (UNDP) and 143 rd out of 172 countries in internal Peace and Stability.This is an India where, in 1947, before the Kleptocracy entrenched itself, the Princely States of Mysore, Travancore and Baroda had universal primary education, health and nutrition and, in 1957, the Indian Army swaggered into Korea to enforce the truce between the US and China and, as a Great Power, was offered a permanent membership of the UN Security Council that Nehru declined in favour of China. In any case, India cannot benefit from talent, competence or integrity. The Indian Constitution and the laws that have flowed therefrom have ensured this and persecuted such upstart, elitist notions as talent, competitiveness, performance, competence, and integrity from these shores or swept them under the carpet of venerated mediocrity. The only thing that benefits India is other people's wealth. For example, the theft of other people's educational and employment opportunities in 1949, nationalization of temples in 1959, the nationalization of Banks in 1969, the continuing theft of lands both public (parks, water bodies) and private Maths, Clubs, Palaces), to the theft of 20% of private (non Moslem and non Christian) education and retrospective legislation as recently as 2012. India benefits from expertise in larceny both grand and miniature. This is reflected in the character of the Nation from the highest to the lowest vested with power to abuse by India's grotesque Constitution and laws

Model Tenancy Act & Reality
Will the proposed model tenancy act have teeth and make it easier to rent properties?
 
The Indian realty market continues to suffer from the strange dichotomy of a huge pent-up demand for homes and staggeringly high inventories of unsold dwellings due to unaffordable prices. At the same time, those who have purchased apartments, as an investment, hesitate to rent them out. This is because the rental housing market has been destroyed over the decades by laws and municipal rules that are biased in favour of tenants. 
 
Even in cities like Mumbai, where short-term leave-and-licence agreements afford a degree of protection, most property-owners are unwilling to risk having tenants. Consequently, thousands of apartments lie vacant in a city that is starved of residential premises. Many of these are owned by realty ‘investors’ or developers who cannot find buyers. The numbers are staggeringly high in all metros, especially Mumbai, NCR (National Capital Region) and Bengaluru.
 
In theory, the government accepts the need for sensible rental agreements, but little has happened in that direction. Now that high property prices have slowed down new sales, it is time the government acted quickly to make vacant dwellings accessible to people, by reforming tenancy laws. 
 
The National Democratic Alliance (NDA) has reportedly decided to revive the Draft Model Tenancy Act, 2015, which will replace the Rent Control Act of 1948, in an attempt to revive the rental market. Ironically, this is yet another move that the United Progressive Alliance (UPA) began, and abandoned, four years ago. The question is: Will it be good enough to encourage property-owners to safely rent out apartments? 
 
Ashwinder Raj Singh of Jones Lang Lasalle, a property consultant, writes that the draft tenancy Act is well-balanced. It will allow landlords to charge market rates and also revise rents periodically or have the property vacated without long and expensive legal battles. At the same time, he says, “There will be a rent ceiling which will be fixed in consultation with the state government to avoid arbitrary hikes.” Also, the security deposit paid by tenants will be capped at three times the monthly rent and the conditions under which landlords will be able to evict tenants will form a part of the written agreement. Further, Mr Singh says, “Tenants can claim a reduction in rent if the quality of services available deteriorates in any way.” It is not clear how this ‘model’ rent agreement will allow landlords to avoid any of the issues that exist today. Any law that allows the government to ‘fix’ a ceiling, instead of allowing market forces to decide rentals, will only perpetuate the current distorted market. 
 
Instead, if the government makes it safe for landlords to rent apartments, to be able to collect the rent on time or evict recalcitrant tenants, thousands of apartments in all Indian cities will immediately come to the market for use. The free and easy availability of rented property will automatically keep rentals as well as deposits in check without government intervention or interference. 
 
It remains to be seen what rules will be framed to prevent arbitrary eviction of tenants; but any ‘model agreement’ that requires the landlord to obtain a court order to evict a tenant is a non-starter because of the excruciatingly slow and expensive judicial process. The NDA’s solution apparently is to have special courts to handle disputes. If these are, indeed, set up (and not just announced on paper, as is usually the case), the rental market may look up. But the government has a poor track record in setting up ‘special’ courts. In fact, if the consumer court system had delivered results in three months, as was promised by the Consumer Protection Act, there would be no need for such special courts. 
 
Moreover, all the good intentions of legislation are defeated as far as grievance redress is concerned. As Ashwinder Raj Singh points out, land is a state subject and any model agreement cannot be binding on them unless specifically adopted. A clue to how this Act will be received lies in the fact that 12 chief ministers did not bother to attend a meeting called by NITI Aayog, presided by the prime minister, in July. But even if the BJP-ruled states were to adopt this model tenancy Act, it would require a lot more than good intent to actually make it work. 

User

COMMENTS

Naresh

2 years ago

The Maharashtra Rent Control act is draconian and as a landlord we are on the wrong side of it. The tenant is also miserable because of his own attitudes as well as his greed to extract every penny out of his meagre rent. I think the Maharashtra Housing Policy due in 2016 will exclude commercial properties exceeding 1200 sq feet out of the preview of the Act.

manoharlalsharma

2 years ago

First to implement proper 'grievance redressal'system then only can one can BUILD TRUST to day we make complaint at CM it takes 120 days to SCAN and SMS.

Shirish Sadanand Shanbhag

2 years ago

Till the time the new model rent act comes in to force, Leave Licence Act, is good enough to protect the interest of the landlord as well as the licensee (rentee).

R S Murthy

2 years ago

It is our habit to find fault with law. system or procedure. We never blame the people. Not that all tenants are problematic or trouble shooters. When I went to Kolkata on my posting, it was not at all difficult to get a flat on rent as the landlords were prefering other state people that too working in a bank rather than the people of the state. Our own people where they get advantage exploit law to the maximum extent and people at the helm also provide full support. Number of litigations on increase as we enjoy in postponing a decision. In any case one pesrson the complainant wants speedy justice but all others do not want quick disposal as all of them are ejoying at the cost of complainant. Dispose all litigations in 3 months irrespective of its seriousness, there is no need to pass any fresh legislation.

Vaibhav Dhoka

2 years ago

Rent act in India is outdated.Are Landlords" Children of Lessor Gods".What sin has landlord committed that all laws are in favor of tenants.There is no dearth of tenements but people are afraid to rent as laws and judicial process if involved is death nail for landlord.Everyone in India expects revision in pay taxes and other levies,then what is wrong in landlord asking for revision every three years.Rent law is like free meal for tenants.Therefore people keep their flats vacant rather than rent out.Rent litigation takes decades for decision to come.

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Online Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine)